OCR Interpretation


Grand Forks daily herald. (Grand Forks, N.D.) 1914-1916, September 18, 1914, Image 8

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89074405/1914-09-18/ed-1/seq-8/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

[c
1 S A E E I
&
.{•
il
IS*'
fft?
if
SPORTS
COACH ANDY Gil DOING FWE WORK
WITH 'VARSITY FOOML ASPIRANTS
SCRIMMAGE FOR
PLAYERS TODAY
Coach Gill Puts Football
Aspirants Through a
Strenuous Program.
Herewith is presented a likeness of
Andy Gill, University of North Da
kota football coach.
Gill started work Monday, and al
ready has demonstrated his ability as
a football mentor.
He has startled 'varsity football
candidates by giving them signal,
tackling and scrimmage work for the
first week of practice.
Gill is a graduate of Indiana. Dur
ing his student days he was a star
athlete and won many honors in vari
ous sport activities.
Last vear he was athletic director
at Albion college, and succeeded in
winning the football and baseball
championship of the -M. T. A. A. He
tied for basketball honors.
Gill also is a star baseball player,
and for a time this summer was short
stop for the Louisville American as
sociation club.
The new coach is exceptionally well
pleased with the local football mater
ial, and he expects them to have a
successful season.
University football candidates were
put through a short but strenuous
scrimmage this afternoon. After giv
ing them two days' work at signals,
Gill started them at tackling prac
tice yesterday, after which he an
nounced that scrimmage would be the
program today.
Lowe, star half for the past two
years, reported yesterday and showed
excellent form for his first work-out.
Flngarson of Hillsboro also reported
and worked -well. Fingarson was tried
out at tackle yesterday.
Flint of Bismarck, a back field can
didate, reported, as did James, a sec
ond squad backfield man last year.
Ralph Lynch, one of the strong line
men. was out in uniform for the first
time yesterday.
The local football stock went up
considerably when Johnson, who play
ed a strong line position for Reloit
last year, reported yesterday for prac
tice. Johnson gives promise of being
a valuable man to the Flickertails.
KOHT7LKR tRAFTFT BY SOX.
Chicago, Sept. 18.—Schuler, the fast
second baseman of the Minneapolis
team, has been drafted and sighed by
the White Sox, according to an an
nouncement ma-de here yesterday.
Schuler played second base for Far
go the past season and was taken 011
for a trial with the Millere at the
same time Pitcher Dumont reported.
He played second during Jimmy Wil
liams' vacation.
Humniiil
illiil!
Iifinl
IHU11
SHKBWV VJM
I
til*
rour^'
aSoki
PATTERSON'S SEAL is pure, mellow Ken
tucky Burley leaf, aged and blended to bring
out'all the delicious richness and sweetness.
Then made into Cut Plug, because the Cut
Plug form retains all the fragrance and fresh
ness, is slow-buming and cool-smoking—just
die way you want it
ANDY GILL, UNIVERSITY FOOT
BALL COACH.
Idle Chatter
Jack Johnson is in London, they
sny. One of those German bullete
must have come close to him.
"I notice," kicked I. M. A. Krab
last night, "that a lot of these hunters
git hnclt and that's all they do git."
AH the Giants have to do to get in
all the world's series filthy is to beat
out the Braves.
"Barbare, recently of the New Or
leans club, yosterdav made his debut
as shortstop for the Cleveland Ameri
can league team. He drove in the
only run scored by his team.
Shortstop Peckinpaugh made hte
first appearance yesterday as man
ager of the New York Americans. He
will direct the club for the remainder
of the season.
New York had an easy time with
Cincinnati yesterday. In the fourth
inning the Giants scored three runs
without a hit. Burns drew three
passes and on his last time up made
a home run with two on bases. The
game also marked a "come hack" for
Mathewson. Ho was strong through
out and allowed but six hits.
Kddie Plank got his .it Detroit yes
terday. The Tigers scored three runs
off him in two innings. Pennock re
lieved him and hold Detroit scoreless
the rest of the game.
Philadelphia riusted Pittsburg from
fifth place yesterday by trimming
PATTERSON'S SEAL is the best Cut Plug
Burley smoking tobacco that the most com
plete tobacco organization in the world
can'
produce. Several seasons* ciopsof tobacco are.
•hwtys stored away to protect PATTERSON'S ",
SEAL
quality.
everywhere in handy 10c pouches
uger sizes.
THE AMERICAN TOBACCO COMPANY
-I
That Good Old Office
j? worthy °f the best tobacco you can get for it, Fill it
with PATTERSON'S SEAL and discover what a sweet, mellow,
pleasant smoke it gives you. You can smoke it all day long,
=T~~~
'v.-^•''•'' ,'
with healthful enjoyment, if you always tuck
mild, cool-smoking, fragrant Cut Plug Burley into it.
There are sweet-crasted, companionable pipes in thousands of offices
mid homes that have never burned any other tobacco than PATTERSON'S
SEAL—because
^thehv owners have always found supreme toipe
satisfaction in
PATTERSON'S SEAL
Cut Plug Burley
Tfffir'l
?w$a!
l'v
them twice. The second game was a
twirling duel between Tincup, an In
dian fiinger, and McQuillan. Strange
ly, tixis game was won in the sixth
inning on two passes, McQuillan let
ting down for the nonce.
After pitching great ball for nine
Innings, Reulback, Brooklyn hurler,
lost his effectiveness in the tenth in
ning and Chicago won. A double by
Schulte and singles by Fisher, Swee
ney, Good and Saier proved Ruel
bach's undoing.
Despite the fact that Duluth and
Superior dopestere gave it the merry
giggle, The Winnipeg Free Prees
writer seemed to take a llttie stock in
the rumor that the war would effect
the Northern league.
It seems impossible, but no "cham
pion" wrestler has breezed Into Grand
Forks with the first chilly weather.
Of course, there is ample time, but
usually the waning days of September
find some preliminary man in our
midst, loudly shouting his superiority
over Frank Gotch and the other
dubs.
These bear storiep emanating from
the Gopher cf)mp are devoured with
avidity by the Flickertail football as
pirants.
If Gill's students can discount them
about 95 per cent, and then learn the
gentle art of walloping a bigger lad,
they'll probably get along fairly well
on October 3.
Now that they are the underdogs,
the Giants are enjoying the pleasant
paetime of receiving joits in the ribs.
Those New York sports, who a few
weeks ago were saving up money to
bet on the Giants in the world's se
ries, are now pulling for George Stall
ing and his crew of Braves. Such
is the frailty of man—even a base
ball gambler.
After the fourth inning yesterday
Manager Ricky of the St. Louis team
put In most of his new players. The
game was hopelessly lost at'thftt time.
And those who survive the football
season will get in jn the basketball
parties so they can crush their domes
against the floor.
'Tis no wonder, then, that so many
of our promising young men fail to
get their B. A'S. All they get is six
feet of earth.
Occassionally one or two live
through it, but instead of a B. A. they
get the initials of their alma mati-i
written across their sweater. And,
strangle, to say, they make father be
lieve !t is just as useful and more
ornamental, it usually wins the girl,
too.
"This may be a good football rule
book," clilrpert Doc" O'Keefe yester
day, "but I'm sure that one player
on my squad, who, by the wnv never
saw a pigskin before, could write a
better one."
We don't know what a few well
wishers have against John Ganzel.
erstwhile Giant star, but it i:i an
nounced that he is slated to ins-vice
the Naps. Ganzel must have been
naughty at one time.
Ole Bill Sommer, nonchalant base
ball magnate, is in again. A $1 00C
mark on the lost side was too much
for Messrs. Schroeder and Tuohy and
so they let their option drop.
JP&wm
to :}!!,!!!'!,!1
11 III'' |',.juiiiiiiuMuii
njnB'
ill
,llmm
1:1.1
,'ii1
ll'll
LiiiTii inn:
Tf—
Up-to-the-Minute Athletic News
BfllSOMMERIS
AGMNJN CHARGE
Option on Superior Club Ex
pires and Old Timer
Holds Reins.
Superior, Wis., Sept. 18.—P. J.
Schroeder and J. Tuohy have fail
ed to exercise their option on the Su
perior baseball club, which expired
yesterday, and the local franchise in
the Northern league has reverted back
to William J. Sommer, active owner
of the club for four years previous to
this season.
Mr. Schroeder, who has been at the
head of the association since last
spring, announced yesterday that he
and Mr. Tuohy would not back the
Red Sox next year. The 1914 manage
ment stands a loss of $1,000 for the
season. "It is too much to ask of two
men," said Mr. Schroder. "If 25 pub
lic spirited men in the city are willing
to back the -club nrxt year both of us
are willing to bear our share.
"Citizens should not permit Superi
or to lose its franchise in the Nor
thern league. It is too valuable an
asset. A league baseball club is a
big advertisement for any city. While
we lost money we are not making any
fu.se about It and are willing to stand
our losses. Every bill against us will
be paid. Personally I like baseball
and hope that a number of the fans
will take hold of the project and see
to it that Superior does not drop out
of the league."
Sommer to Sell.
Sommer announces that he will not
take active management of the club
again .and will make an attempt to
dispose of the franchise- He will rep
resent the local association at. the an
nual meeting of the Northern league
to be held in Duluth Monday and at
that time will probably make an at
tempt to dispose of the franchise out
side of Superior.
A number of cities would like to'se
cure the franchise but it is ujjlikely
that the other magnates would permit
a transfer of the club to another city.
The league wants Superior in the cir
cuit. Superior is needed to fill out the
loop The rivalry between Superior
and Duluth is one of the biggest
booms to the organization.
Mr. Schroeder -and Mr. Tu by took
charge. of .the club last spring on an
optional agreement with Mr. Sommer.
At that time Sommer announced that
he was through with baseball In Su
perior. Sommer tigure'd on securing
I a franchise in San Diego in the Pa
ifie coast league but negotiations fell
I through and it may be that Sommer
plans to continue in charge of the Su
perior club unless he can secure a
good price for the local franchise.
While Superior did not do very well
this season it w^s through*no fault or
hrocder or Tuohy. The'' association
made every effort to bolster the club
during the seaconj.but played In con
tinual hard '"cjp. Managers were
changed, new ^Slayers were secured
and other efforts were made to de
velop a ?.trong team. All of these ef
forts' were of no avail.
Just what the magnates will do re
garding the makeup of the Northern
'eague at the meeting Monday has not
been determined. The delegates will
review the doings of the past season,
and check up the pool receipts and
make the annual divvy. Outside of
that it i6 not. probable that any
definite plans will be outlined for the
new circuit. The rearrangement of
the circuit will be decided on at the
mid-winter meeting later.
Standing of Clubs
NATIONAL LEAGUE.
Boston
New York
Chicago ....
St. Louis ..
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh ..
Brooklyn ...
Cincinnati
Yesterday's Games.
Chicago 5, Brooklyn 1.
Cincinnati 1, New York 10
Pittsburgh 3, 0 Philadelphia #, 2
St. Louis 1, Boston 5.
AMERICAN LEAGUE.
Philadelphia 89
Boston 80
Washington 72
Detroit ...70
Chicago 63
St. Louis 61
New York ..61
Cleveland 43
Yesterday's Games.
Cleveland 1, Boston 8.
•Philadelphia 8, Detroit 3
New York 7, Chicago 2
Washington 12, St. Louis 2.
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION.
Indianapolis
Kansas City .,
Minneapolis
St. Paul ..
"W?5^Wp^^
THE GRAND FORKS DAILY HERALD, FRIDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 18, 1914.
NEW YORK
INDIANAPOLIS
L. Pet.
46 .659
53 .602
64 .529
63 .526
71 .470
73 .455
75 .448
93 .316
W. L. Pst.
90 66 .579
86 67 .562
81 69 .540
81 73 .627
77 77 .500
71 79 .490
74 84 .468
53 103 .340
Games
Yesterday.
Columbus 7. Louisville, 8.
FEDERAIi LEAGUE.
Chicago
Indianapolis
Baltimore
Buffalo
Brooklyn
Kansas City ..
St. Louis
Pittsburgh .,
Yesterday's Games.
Buffalo 7, St Louis 2.'
Indianapolis 2, Brooklyn 6.
Chicago 6, Pittsburgh 2.
Kansas Clty^, Baltimore S.
AMER. ASSOCIATION
LoaisvUle Wins.
3
Columbus .........
545
.u
BASEBALL
National League
ST. LOUIS
At BOSTON
St. Louis, Doak and Wlngo Boston,
James and Gowdy.
PITTSBURG..
4t PHILADELPHIA*
Pittsburgh, Adams and Coleman
Philadelphia, Marshall, Baumgartner
and Dooin, Burns.
CINCINNATI,
Cincinnati. Schneider and Gonzales
New York, O'Toole, Fromme and My
ers.
CHICAGO
At BROOKLYN...
Batteries: Chicago, Cheney and
Archer Brooklyn, Aitchison and Mc
carty.
American Assn.
MHj^vAmtEE
R. H. B.
At KANSAS CITY..
LOUISVILLE
At COLUHBUS....
Batteries: Louisville, Toney and
Severeid Columbus. Ferry and Smith.
LEVELAND..,
Minneapolis at St. Paul. No game
today.
Federal League
INDIANAPOLIS
BROOKLYN
Batteries: Indiana, Kaiserllng and
Rairden Brooklyn, Brown and Ow
ens.
ST. LOUIS
BUFFALO
W. L. Pet..
77 55 .584
74 59 .556
72 63 .533
71 64 .526
64 70 .477
62 71 .466
57 74 .435
77 .421
Batteries: St. Louis, Daveport and
Simon: Buffalo, Anderson and La
vigne.
KANSAS CITY
At BALTIMORE}...
Batteries: Kansas City, Packard
and Easterly Baltimore. Wilhelm and
Jacklitsch
at Pittsburgh
Chicago, Lange Pendergast and
Wilson Pittsburgh, Camiiitz and Ber
ry
American Leagu
AT ST. XXJUI8
BOSTON
At CLEVELAND.
311012
Batteries: Boston, Shore and
Thomas Cleveland, Steen and Egan.
PHILADELPHIA...
DETROIT
.....
NEW YORK.
At CHICAGO
E.
7 5
Louisville 11 3
Goshom. Davis and Smith North
rop and 8aver«M..• m.'
-Only one game was scheduled.
Never despise llttie things. The
Iggest man- that evsr lived was once
,,,,, ,, EASY MONEY.
(Boston Transcript)
Mr. Meekly—rOur neighbor's son is
always thrashing my boy. What shall
I do about it?
Lawyer—Teach him how to fight
Ten dollars, please.
ALL SHS DOES.,
(Detroit Free Presa)*1
:s:i
I- v.'
*«.
pr
1
(By Ben.)
Oh! Hah! Bruce—Sir Robert Bruce
Liggett, by the way—trotted down
Superior street the other day and pur
chased a bouquet for our Flickertail
ball players. Bruce didn't address
the package to them personally, but,
to carry a point he was endeavoring
to make, he simply had to drag them
in—obscurely and round-aboutly to be
sure.
This.Bruce has had it in for J. H.
Ritchie and the American association
for some time—chieflv because the
former writes about the latter, and,
too, because he—Sir R. B. L., you
understand—is doing busher duty for
a bush league.
Here's Bruce's latest anent the A.
A. "Listen lads—this American as­
K-.r viV'i-'-i
•r-'.
v*
At housework dainty Mabe^ stops,
She' says the knows not how
The only thlnr the ftver mopp
Is, now and then, her brow
.* I
^!j»-ui^*jvaa4.i— -.an,
V-
SPORTS
(it*
"JOMMoore
CIGAR 10*
Little7bw
5f
The
Correct Shoe
for the
College
Man
"For the Man Who Cares"
$
A
perfect
shoe that
will fit
your foot
with
comfort
and
style.
Shoe Dept.
51R. BPQriffith
JV
llitr »i
UN iJt!
kl. 9
sociation is the safe and unruffled
refuge of the old women of baseball
and its uneventful life is as calm and
placid as farm life in North Dakota
during the months that follow the
harvest."
He says-about two players will
march up out of. the A. A. Then he
adds this:
"All of the Northern league play
erR that have broken into the A. A.
this fall have stellared with effulgent
and highly glittering success."
The bouquet, James! Quickly, be
fore it slips from the trembling hand
of Bruce!
All of the players that have gone
up to the asso'ciati&n are from the
Grand Forks baseball team.
Again, His Brucelets, declares that
the "humble and mor6 or less obscure"
Northern league has had more prom
ising players during the past season
than the association.
Another bouquet, James!
Grand Forks has sent six players
into faster company, one into the
American league and the other five
into the A. A. One of the latter was
drafted by the Tigers.
Fortunate is the man who can sea
the finish of his enemies.
J.
1
r-t
I..
•Mp-M
Store
&

xml | txt