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Grand Forks daily herald. (Grand Forks, N.D.) 1914-1916, September 22, 1914, Image 1

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89074405/1914-09-22/ed-1/seq-1/

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DCSOnED BEFORE
RUSSIAN HOSTS
Believed That Fight Now
Under Way will be Most
Sanguinary.
GREAT HANDICAPS
FOR JOSEPH'S FORCE
Headlong Flight, Pnt Ibea in Posl
Hons Where They Are Now Making
Their Stand Against the Invading
Forces of the Czar.
London, Sept. 22.—The third great
tattle between Austria and Russia,
with 2,000,000 men engaged along a
battle line extending ISO miles, from
Prsemysl to Cracow, is being fought.
The present conflict promises to be
the most sanguinary of all that have
been fought in the eastern theaters of
war. The Austrians are defending
with the courage of despair their last
strong line. In the last three days tho
Russians are reported to have taken
16,000 Austrian prisoners.
Terrible handicaps render the Aus
trian situation doubly precarious. It
was only by the most headlong re
treats that they managed to reach the
rallying points' aloftg tlj.e Cracow
Przemsyl. line and in retreating they*
were compelled to abandon their ar
tillery. and«nvcMe«..eXwiiioh,.tU«yar»
"now In vital-need.' s*-
Austrians Evacuate Jarodan.
blq itchN -Petrograd "luf
nounce that the Austrians have evacu
ated Jaroslau. less than 20 miles
northwest of Przemysl. and that great
siege guns are being Implanted In
concrete beds around Przemvsl for the
reduction of the forts there.
The evacuation of Jareslau Is con
firmed by a censored dispatch from
Vienna by the way of Rome.
Przemysl, according to dispatches
from both Austria- and Russia is now
the center of the fiercest fighting, for
the conflict is raging as never before
along every mile of the line to Cra
cow.
One unofficial Petrograd dispatch
insists that the Russians have pierced
the Austrian line, cutting off General
Dankl's army. General Dankl is re
ported to have been thwarted first in
his effort to reach Przemsyl and later
In his attempt to gain the shelter of
the Cracow guns. His army is said
to be especially handicapped by lack
of artillery Another unofficial Petro
grad dispatch via Rome says General
Dankl's army.Is believed' to be sur
rounded.
Paris, Sept. 82.—A dispatch to the
Havas agency from Nlsh. Servia, says:
"After several days of battle near
Kroupanl, ten miles from the Bosnian
border, in which 260.000 Austrians
were engaged, the Austrians suffered
a complete defeat and are flying In
panic from the banks of the river
Drina.
"The Servians, who called back
their troops in Syrmia for this battle,
are now advancing toward Svornik.
"On the river Save an Austrian de
tachment tried to capture the town of
Shaba fat, 40 miles west of Belgrade,
but were thrown back with great
losses."
Austria's Dilemma.
Vienna, Sept. 22.—The Austria of
ficial reports continue to give only
scant detail of fresh. fighting in Qa
lleia.
There is a constant flow of Polish
refugees into Vienna. Several train
loads of them arrived here Sunday,
and more are reported to. be on their
way. The municipal authorities are
experiencing great difficulty in find
ing accommodation tor the large
numbers of destitute', who already ag
gregate 100.000.
Farmers are unable to secure suf
ficient labor to aid them in preparing
for their autumn planting or to carry
new grain to the rhills. which are be
sieged with orders for flour.- Conse
quently the price of grain has ad
vanced 26 per cent. The temporaiy
suspension of Import duties on grain,
fodder, cattle and meat is proving
futile, owing to the opposition of the
agrarian party in Hungary, which is
contesting the admission of foreign
provisions.
Shortage in the supplies of raw cot
ton threatens to bring serious
to the ootton spinners. The spinners
are endeavoring to procure supplies of
the staple from the United States,
through Italy. Italy prohibits the ex
portation of coffee. but It is thought
rihewlll permit supplies to p«—
through her territory.
German Activity In Pmta.
Petrograd, Sept. 22—The German
consul at Tabriz, Persia, has taken
refuge in the American hospital, fear
ing that he will be attacked toy Rus
sians. It Is officially explained that
the Russians in Tabriz have been
rreatly Incensed by the alleged pro
vocative attitude of the Germans In
Tabris, including the consul,
)f
The Russian consul, however, took
to protect the Germans, an da
.. Persian guard was placed in the Ger
«t) -.j mail consulate. Despite this, an un»
fi known man entered the consulate and
sa
,T wri
«fit,^-
EDITION
VOL. 9, NO. 325.
stj
«i".\ ',
threatened the consul with a revolver.
The Germans in Tabrts have been ad
vised to leave the city.
Italy Aflame for War.
Rome, Sept 22.—Italy continues
aflame for war. All over the kingdom
the popunlace declares friendship for
England, denounces Austria, and criti
cises the military authorities for wait
ing. One hundred thousand persons
gathered In front of the British em
bassy yesterday,, terribly in earnest,
and cheers for England, as the friend
of Italy, responded. After the union
jack had been displayed at the em
bassy the crowd marched to the min
ister of war and demanded they be led
Into the Tyrol.
Strong guards of troops are formed
around the German and Austrian em
bassies and are being Increased.
From end to end and from sea to
sea there Is the same warlike spirit.
Northern Italy is angered by reports
that Italian reservists have been com
pelled to serve ii) the Austrian armv
and have been sacrificed on the firing
line. The people are especially in
censed at the tardiness of the gov
ernment in permitting the settling of
old scores. The nation Is only await
ing a signal.
Tcrmonde Still Bombarded.
London, Sept. 22.—A dispatch to the
Central News from Ghent says that
the Gerjnans continue the bombard
ment of Termonde, presumably with
the object of preventing a further Bel
gian sortie from Antwerp.
Reduction of $35,000,000 in
Rivers and Harbors Bill
is Made.
Wa«hlng( 0|(, jfttfot/. 2».trThe,» v.lctoiy.
waa^ffBrojlliiiur *£&&sr'tm
river and harbqr tlll bpre fruit sjeed
_ily today, when, the commerce com
wttfs#0MWWJy Teif6lrted a'lieVr meas
ure providing $20,000,000 to be spent
by army engineers.
No prolonged discussion Is expected
in the senate, but how the house
would receive the reduction of nearly
$36,000,000, could not be predicted.
DESTROYER OF
EMBASSY FREED
Berlin, Sept. 22.—The Nevee Vrem
ya of Petrograd reports that the de
stroyers of the German embassy in
Petrograd who were arrested have
now been released as the destruction
of the embassy was prompted by
"noble and patriotic feelings."
PRESIDENT VOTES
Goes to Princeton Today to Oast His
Ballot.
Washington, Sept. 22.—President
Wilson left at 8 o'clock today for
Princeton, N. J., where he will vote
in the primary election. He will re
turn to Washington tonight.
COMMONER TO DELIVER
THREE ADDRESSES IN
STATE DURING AUTUMN
William J. Bryan, secretary of
state, will deliver three addresses
in North Dakota this fall, accord
ing to arrangements which have
been made by the democratic
state central committee.
The places and dates of these
addresses have not been set as yet,
but It 1s probable that one of
them will be given In Grand
Forks.
Arrangements have also been
made by w"tch Senator Owens of
Oklahoma and Former Governor
John Burke of this state will de
liver a series of addresses In the
interests of the democratic candi
dates.
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NORTH
HERE'S THE KAISER'S
LATEST PHOTOGRAPH
Cmperor William.
MEXICANS MAY
STAGE
Feared that Villa Will At
tempt to Quell Disturbance
by Independent Force.
Washington, Sept. 22.—There was
a pessimistic tone in advices from
Mexico today. Local trouble in Son
ora has given rise ,to fear' among some
observers that Villa may attempt to
quell the disturbance thiere independ
ent of Carranza's orders.
As yet, however, nothing of a
definite nature has reached officials.
NO CONTESTS ON
Primary Election in Massachusetts Is
a Quiet Affair.
Boston, Sept. 22.—The absence of
contests for the head of the state
ticket in any of the three parties led
to the expectation that not more than
a third of the voting strength will be
represened to today's Massachusetts
primary.
BOOZE CAUSED ROW.
Wahpeton, N. D„ Sept. 22.—Instead
of fighting over matters relating to
the European war, as claimed, the
shooting of Paul Friemann by Fred
Baton on the 'Adams'farm was the re
sult of the Tatter's Intoxication. Some
one struck him b'ri the' nose. He didn't
know who ft'wtUs," but he secured a re
volver and 'shot his friend, 'Frfemann,
through the body. The latter is In
the hospital with a small chance for
recovery.
SUNK IN NORTH SEA
Submarines Send Trio of English Vessels to Bottom
Torpedoes Used on Comparative Obsolete type
Fighting1 Machine.
Io®doni Sept. Mr—Tte British warships Aboukir, Hogue. and
Cnmy, have been wink la the North Sea, by: Submarines, according to
announcement by ofltolrt bureau this afternoon.,'
The announcement says a considerable number of vessels and
erawa were saved by tt. If. 8. loweetoft, and by a division erf torpedo
oOttt deotrorero.
The Aboukir was torpedoed first. The Hogue and Creesy drew
to save the www, when tbegr atao were torpedoed.
of casualties among the' crews will be published as soon
aa known. The vrssels were armored cruisers of a comparatively ob
aolete type, built fourteen years ago.
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OAKOTA'SJREATEST
Station in Pai
Germans,
Anoth#:
iW.***** nhdW1/ vu6MWU i^
.foi s, rv VM?.-?
c, Owned by
ptured by
the Br|tish,
}t-
Xiondon,- Sept. 2?—The' destruction
of the wireless t«9#graph station on
the Island of Naur^i, which removes
the last Germanf^Btalionary wireless
apparatus in the-J^fctflc ocean, is re
ported In a dSepatili to Reuters, from
Sydney, New South' Watee. The Brit
ish flag,now flies o«er tbe Island.
Scattered rfighttAtt nas vaken place
at Rabau], on Ncwpommern, an isl
and In the Blsmaro^ archipelago.
Bemn Announcement Gives
Loss—Britijs^|[oss Aboard
Attacking? Vessel.
Berlin, via Rotterdam and Ixmdon,
Sept. 22.—The report of the sinking
of the German -Armed merchant
cruiser, Cap Trafalgar. September 14
oft the coast of" SqJJth America, by
the Cunard line $ steamer Carmania,
converted Into a ^British auxiliary
cruiser, has been .confirmed in the
official statement gfven out here to
day.
The communication adds the crew
of the Cap Trafalgar was saved by
the German steamtf- Slenore Woer
man.
British: 1 bases.
London, Sept. 22 i—The admiralty
has issued the officw Hat of casualties
on the Carmania. wl ich sank an arm
ed German merch&m, steamer off the
South American coij&. It gives nine
meu killed fh'eJlyuad^fl, none of
£STw:ewfei«iii.
Treiz- Ondi Asia Minor, (via Ixjndon,
Sept. 22.—Twenty-two persons were
drowned,- the result of the sinking of
the British steamer, Belgian King,
near Cape Kureli yesterday.
The Belgian King carries passen
gers and a crew to the number of 120
Ninety-eight of them were saved by
a Russian steamer.
It is surmised that this accident is
due to a mine, but the real cause has
not been revealed.
VOTING IN NEW JERSEY.
Trenton, N. J., Sept. 22.—Candi
dates for .congress, legislature, city
and county offices will be choeen by
the various political parties'in a state
wide primary today.
REVENUE B1L
Washington, Sept. 22.—The war
revenue bill to provide 1105,000,000
was agreed on before the house ways
and means committee today, follow
ing its Introduction in the house. The
bill will be taken up the house Thurs
day.
CLAIMS EVIDENCE
Judge I»ightan Issues Order In Minot
Police light.
Minot, N. D., Sept. 22.—.Another
chapter has been arlded to the now
famous Robinson case. Judge Leigh
ton issued an order, which was served
on eaoh of the five city commission
ers, to show cause why Ed. Robinson,
former chief of police, should not
be reinstated as patrolman. The case
will be heard in chambers today at 2
o'clock.
Robinson claims that he was hired
for a year as patrolman. He was ad
vanced to the position of chief of po
lice and after the Investigation start
ed. resigned. He claimed that he is
still on the force, the only charges
having been made were that he was
unqualified to be chief.
Robinson was removed from the po
lice force Monday night upon motion
of President Rudd, seconded by Wll
son, Byorum voting with them. If
Robinson wins his point he can con
tinue to act as patrolman until the ex
piration of his year.
.. PATENT ATTACHMENT.
Sheldon, N. D., Sept. 22.—Invent
ing a potato elevator that can be at
tached to almost any potato digger
and will carry up the tubers to a wag
on driven alongside the maohine. Rev
R. C. Crough and George Patterson
have placed potato raising on a more
profitable basis here. The attach
ments can be made at .less than 40
cost and will eliminate all the drudg
ery and expense of potato picking, one
of the serious obstacles to success
ful potato culture. As this section has
gone heavily' into potato raising, the
new1 Invention Is regarded as especial
ly timely.
ijmg WKATHSR,
North Dakota:' FVUr Untight
tad Wednesday. Warmer.
7a.ni- 42 maximum If mini
mum 42 wind 12 miles north
west precipitation .08 barometer
M.01.
ft ft ftft ft ft ft ft ft 9
1* ."H .,
GRAND FORKS, N. &„ TUESDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 22, 1914. EIGHT PAGES—PRICE FIVE CENTS.
FRENCH ARMY CHIEF
HAS HAD BUT LITTLE
EXPERIENCE I& WAR
BOHBS DROPPED
NEAR CHY CATES
Considerable Damage Done
by Explosions—Plane's
Identity Unknown.
Amsterdam, via London. Sept. 22.—
An aeroplane of unknown nationality
dropped bombs in Maestricht this
morning. neat- the Brussels gate, ac
cording to a dispatch received here.
No lives were lost.' but considerable
damage was done.
BELGIAN RELIEF
WORK IS GOOD
Washington. Sept 22.—The Belgian
minister at Washington announced
that the central committee in charge
of collecting funds for relief of desti
tute wives and children of Belgian sol
diers will form subcommittees in
clttas all over the country. Subscrip
tions may be sent to the Belgian lega
tion. SOU Massachusetts avenue,
Washington, until the committees are
announced.
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1
NEtrHER SIDE LAYS CUUM TO
SUCCESS STMICGLE OH fllSH
German Wing Driven Back Short Distance, But Ques*
tion of Ultimate Effect Isn't Clear-Maintained
That Kaiser's Forces Are Not Confident
Another day is gone and neither Germany nor the allies lays claim to any de
cisive outcome of the battle of Aisne, where the supreme conflict of the war, up to
the present, has long been raging.
Taken as a whole, the engagement seems to be partaking the nature of si
siege. Both sides continue to hold the majority of their strongly entrenched posi
tions. The German lines for 100 miles are described as a continuation of forts and
heavy entrenchments. Artillery fire continues day and night.
It appears nothing but a successful flanking movement could seriously affect
either army. But neither front has been broken, and neither side outflanked.
Rheims appears to be the center of the most persistent fighting. In Belgium
the situation shows no real change.
Russians are before Przemysl, engaging this Austrian fortress in Galicia
with artillery fire.
Rheims is between the lines of battle and the city has sufferd heavily. It is
said the Germans are most anxious to recapture this point.
The latest official communication from Berlin, issued Monday night, says
the Germans captured hill positions at Croanne and occupy the village of Betheny,
three miles outside of Rheims, to the north.
The military expert of the London Times gives the positions to the French
forces on the left, which, if correct, show a remarkable advance along the flank of
the German right wing under commander General Von Kluck.
There is no confirmation of the Antwerp report that Von Kluck had transfer*
red his headquarters to Mons.
Russians claim the Austrians in Galicia are fleeing before them, while Vienna
declares these movements of her army are for reorganization.
ARCHANGEL WILL
BE KEPT OPEN LATE
London, Sept. 22.—According to in
formation received by the British
board of trade, it may be found pos
sible to keep open the Russian port of
Archangel in the Arctic ocean by
means of the breaking steamers until
the end of November and possibly un
til the middle of -December. It is
hoped also to make arrangements for
additional berths which will facilitate
the discharge of private cargoes.
Archangel is the most northerly -point
in the railway system of Europe and
Is the only seaport on the north coast
of the Russian empire. The harbor
usually is free from ice only between
July and September.
SON OF KAISER
REPORTED SHOT
London, Sept. 22.—An Exchange
Telegraph dispatch from The Hague
•ays a message received from Berlin
state* that Prinoe August William, the
PARIS OFFICIAI) ANNOUNCEMENT TAME.
Paris, Sept. 22.—The following announcement was made todayf
"Along the entire front, from Oise to Woevre river, the Germans mani
tested yesterday certain activity, without, however, obtaining amine*
ciablc result*.
bur Teft yftiig on'the^ffht banlc ol" the riTw Oise, Get*
mans were obllgea to yielrt Krouaa before French attacks. Between
Oise and the Aisne the situation remains unchanged. The enemy has
not delivered any serious attack, contenting himself yesteMay wtth
continued cannonading.
"Second, on the center between Rheims and Soualn, the enemy at
tempted offensive movement which was repulsed, while between Sou
aln and Argonne we made some progress.
"Between Argonne and the river Meuso there has been no change.
"In the Woevre district, the enemy made a violent effort and at
tacked the heights of the Meuse, along the rront between Tresaveaux,
Vignouilles and Hendcourt without, however, succeeding in gaining a
position on the heights.
"Donestre, to the south of Blamont, has been reoccnpied by the
eneiny.
"September 20 and 21 we captured twenty automobiles moving
provisions, with men attached to them. Also we captured numerous
prisoners.
"Concerning tbe Russians in Galicia: Rear guards of the Austrian
army have been pursued by the Russians, and have suffered consider
able losses. Russian troops came into contact with the Austrian gar
rison near Przemysl. Heavy Russian artillery is bombarding the for
tifications of Jaroslav."
London. Sept. 22.—The Times correspondent, discussing the iff"t
battle, says:
"The battle of Aisne continues, having lasted a week, with the allies
making slow progress against extraordinary difficulties.
"It can no longer, properly speaking, be called a battle, but a siege.
The Germans having constructed along their 100 mile front a series of
small fortresses, from the Oise river to the Meuse river, made of old
forts and disused quarries.
"The plains of C&nmptiign are admirably suited for the French oh
fenslve."'
Paris, Sept. 22.—The battle of Charlerol lasted three days, the bat
tle of Marne covered six days, though the retirement of the Germans
commenced oh the third day.
Today is the seventh day of the battle of Aisne, the most violent of
the three, but the limit of human endurance seems to have been reach
ed as the intensity of the struggle diminished around Rhlems.
At Caroline, after a brief lull fighting has become fleroe afpdw, and
the losses of the Germans Increased. Here alone, on the whole line,
hand to hand fighting occurred yesterday. Everywhere else die in
vaders left the attack to "Brummors," as they call the immewe mor
tars which did so much damage to the cathedral of Rhiems.
The deduction of military experts hero is that weariness show*
more decidedly In the German camp. They are said to be feverishly
active In their work on fortifications along the Sambre from Maubeug*
to Xamur, and even on their lines of defense across the German fron
tier. This is taken to indicate the lack of confidence in the final
of the clash of Aisne.
London, Sept. 22.—A Paris dispatch to the Express says:
"Military experts here believe the Germans Intend to raw the
entire city or Rheims. While the city Itself Is immaterial from a
military standpoint, it is the center of a district of highest rtratiwfn
value."
GERMANS SAY THEY ARE SUCCESSFUL.
Washington, Sept. 22.—The German embassy today received
following wireless from Berlin:
"Headquarters reports September 21 that the attack anJat the
French-English armv makes progress. Rheims lies in tbe oath «e««nrt
the battle line. We reirret being forced to answer the fire. Th« city
suffers but orders have been given to spare the cathedral.
"In the middle of Alsace, the French attacks have been
reoulaed
The subscription to tbe German war loan up to the pieaent
4,200,000,000 marks."
i:.fil „., fefe|
EVENING^
EDITIONl
\H
-4 :'r§ VU
•U:
tbe
fourth son of Emperor William, was
shot in the left arm during the battle
of the Marne, and that Emperor Will
iam has bestowed the Iron Cross of
tbe first class on him.
PRESIDENT STILL
IS SEEKING PEACE
Washington, Sept. 22.—President
Xv
Pv
Wilson said today that he was prayer- n*
fully working for peace in Europe but j~
he indicated that nothing of a definite -Vi
or formal character had yet beenT' w!
done. The president declines to dis
cuss at this time the report that he
will call a world conference to discuss
peace, declaring publicity about this
phase of the sltuation might interfere
with his serioua work. The president
declared that a world's crisis exists,!'^,
and that only serious remedies ahoul«
be discussed.
FALL FROM SPEEDER FATAH,
Stanley, N. D„ Sept. 23.—While rid
In* on a gasoline speeder, aus^flhoia,.'^
a Greek laborer, fell off tbe front ofi\J
the machine and received injuries
which soon afterwards proved Mitel
A
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