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Grand Forks daily herald. (Grand Forks, N.D.) 1914-1916, September 24, 1914, Image 1

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89074405/1914-09-24/ed-1/seq-1/

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S
EVENING
EDITION
'W 1
If
i-
HE REFUSED TO
ALTER VEWSON
Sending of American War
ships to Turkish Waters
the Bone of Contention
f?w
SENSATION IN
DIPLOMATIC CIRCLES
Hasty Steps by the Administration In
Connection With Interview by Gor­
man Shows Desire to Avoid Possi­
bility of Neutrality Violation.
Washington, Sept. 24.—A. Rustem
Bey, Turkish ambassador, has inform
ed President Wilson he does not alter
the views recently expressed in a pub
lished interview, and will leave the
United States within a fortnight.
The announcement of the withdraw
al of Bey caused a profound sensation
in diplomatic circles.
Coming close on another diplomatic
Interview yesterday, of which the ad
ministration Immediately took cogniz
ance, that of Baron Von Schoen of
the German embassy, dwelling upon
the possibility of' war between the
United States and Japan, it was inter
preted as Indicating Wilson's deter
mination to silence comment by for
eign diplomats considered dangerous
to the neutrality to this country.
B#y, In an interview, had criticised
the' sending of American warship* ito
Turkish- waters in connec^off' wlth the
gpijiMK'
'^8^Mfis«d tb discuss his action
further than to Say he had asked his
government for a leave of absence,
which he is certain would be granted,
and he would leave for Constantinople
lni ten days.
In his interview recently, after crit
icism of the sending of warships to
Turkish waters, he said while mas
sacres had previously occurred in
Turkey, they were the same acts as
any people might commit under prov
ocation. He cited the lynching of ne
groes and "water cureB" in the Phil
ippines as an example, reminding the
.American people of those incidents.
.When asked if he cared to alter his
views, Bey replied to the administra
tion that he did not and that he would
leave in a fortnight.
ARE ORDERED^TO
Maj. Dieckmann of Germans
in Commune of Grievegnee
Issues the Order.
London, Sept. 24.—The official
.pijess -bureau last night' made public
the copy of a proclamation said to
have been issued by Major DiecKmann,
commanding the general forces of the
Gerrfians in the commune'of Grieveg
nee, a supurb of Liege. The procla
mation ordered all inhabitants to give
up arms or explosives, saying:
"Whosoever does not do "thia will
be liable to the penalty ot. death he
will be sh'6t immediately or other
,wise executed unless he can prove
he is not .to blame."
The inhabitants of the commune are
ordered to be indoors at nightfall and
to' keep their doors shut. "Resistance
to orders,", the proclamation says,
-"entails a penalty of death."
ot
After statin* that the inhabitants
certain vlllagee*will be permitted
to return to their homes the procla
mation says, the burgomaster must
furnish a Met of persons who are to
-be kept as hostages and that the list
is. to be changed every day.
"The lives of these hostages," says
W?M .the proclamation.'"are at stake if the
population does not keep quiet under
all circumstances. I shall select out
^S^slde the lists given me persons who,
no®*1 of one day to noon of the
?%i^ M|next' day, ••will have to stay as host
v:«$r|agear If a relieving hostage does not
^appear punctually, the first hostages
i-
*.
•..»»•«•••••«*••
THE WEATHER.
Fair tonight
and Friday. Not mach ot^ange in
I* temperature.
raiivBBsirY "HE^mNoaii
7 a. m. 87:
onln'M
barometer S0.S2.
minl-
«.»•'«
imr-
r^Vf'
1V ,4
Wireless Company is
Ordered to Close by
Secretary of War
Washington, Sent. 24.—Secre
tary Daniels today ordered the
Marconi wireless station at Sias
conset, Mass.. closed tomorrow,
In consequence of the {failure of
the company to give assurance
that it would comply with the
naval consorship regulations.
Vessel Which is Credited
With Sinking the Three
Chiisers is Safe.
London, Sept. 24.—A dispatch to
Reuters from Amsterdam, states the
German consul there, according to
newspaper telegraph, has been advis
ed by his government that the sub
marine U-9, which is credited with
Sinking three British cruisers Tuesday,
returned to the German port unin
jured.
ncins
Ten Gallons of the Fluid
Dq#n Corridors of
Jersey City, N. J., Sept. 24.—Over
thirty persons were overcome by the
fumes of nitric acid today in a pass
ageway leading, to the Hudson tunnel
tube station, when a carboy, contain
ing ten gallons of the acid, toppled
over in the Erie railroad station here,
pouring the fluid down the corridors.
Three persons are in a serious condi
tion.
32,000, CANADIANS GONE.
St. John, N". B., Sept. 24.—
Speaking before a labor conven
tlon, Canadian Minister of Labor
Crothere announced that 22,000
Canadian volunteers have gone
to the front in the last day or
two.
4
30MS OUT
4
IP
Yti' -V' 7 O
MM
VOL. 9, NO. 327. GRAND FORKS, N. D„ THURSDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 24,
1914.<p></p>OF
IMTED SHIES'
Land Force in China For
Advance Against German
Possession in Empire.
Tokio, Sept. 24.—The war office
makes the official announcement that
British troops, under Brigadier Gen-,
eral Barnard, commander of the
North China forces, had landed yes
terday in the neighborhood of Lao
shan bay, to participate in movements
against the Germans at Tsing-Tau.
A O A S S E A E I
#-wm
Latest Trouble Between Carranza and Villa Will not Ne
cessitate Keeping of Troops at Vera Cruz—Watch-*
ful Waiting to be Continued.
ATTEMPT TO PATCH CU DIFFERENCES.
Mexico City, Sept, 24.—Efforts are being raadehpefe to patch up the
break between Villa and Carranza. Officials tried tO^coneeal the break,
but the news leaked out, causing a sensation among military men.
General Gonzales, chief of the army of the east, felcgraphed Villa
eight reasons why he should remain friendly to (^bnia.
Washington, Sept. 24.—Gen. Carranza has informed the United
States that he will not attack Gen. Villa, but will' tbikler his forces to
be on the defensive, and resist attack. He said a" Convention will be
held October 1. as scheduled.
Washington, sept. 24.—It was officially stated at the White House
today that the latest troubles between Carranza and Villa would not
alter the plans of the United States regarding tjfyp withdrawing of
troops from Vera Cruz or the status of tlie embargo on arms.. No date
has been fixed for moving troops. It was said that Wilson takes the
position that Carranza and Villa must settle thelv .differences without
Interference by the United States and that the presence of troops in
Vera Cruz would not solve the difficulty.
According to official information. Villa Is willing/to have. Carranza
become provisional president or resign now to run for the presidency
later, villa objects, however, to Carranza doing., Mth.
Wilson will continue his watchful policy and allow the Mexicans to
work out their own destiny, providing the rights of foreigners are
not transgressed, it is said here.
MAY FIGHT AGAIN- AT TORREOX.
El Paso, Sept. 24.—The first battle of the latest Mexican revolution
probably will occur at the old battle grounds of either Torreon or
Zacatecas, if Villa's revolt against Carranza results in armed revolu
tion.
Villa, forced to abandon his expedition in the assistance of the
Maytorena revolt today, rushed his forces south from Juarez and Chl
hauliua city to meet what is reported as a strong force of Carranza's
soldiers, moving north from Aguas Callentes, Zacatecas.
According to the estimates, Villa controls nearly 40,000 troops.
HOPE FOR AMIABLE SETTLEMENT.
Washington, Sept. 24.—Villa's open repudiation •^rai'a.rm's au
thority as first chief of the constitutionalists' arm oi the
executive power of Mexico, spread sinister' feeling jr Jiclee
today. While officials admitted that the sltuatkjAV-jiw !liwir,ilng
one, they are not without the hope that the troitUta a. lead
to a physical clash.
•nrr
WW
RUINS OF CATHEDRAL IN LOUVAIN AFTER GERMANS SACKED CITY.
Shells Fired on British City
in India, But With Lit
tie Damage.
Calcutta, via London, Sept. 24.—•
The papers here publish an official
dispatch,, stating the German cruiser
Emden, while passing Madras fired
a few shells, but the damage to the
city was slight.
Madras is a seaport of British India,
the seat of the government and head
quarters of the Madras army.
This picture shows what .waa left of the ancient and beautiful cathedral ot St. Pierre, in Louvoln, after th« German army finished burning
the town,. The cathedral was noted: all over the world for its.'chimes, as well as'for its architecture. The interior of the edifice ehows even great
er destruction :ti)ap the outside. Statues.on the walls and pillars were torn down-and smashed to bit*. .While' the walls were left standing it ia
likely that muoh work-will be required to restore the building for use.
TJfWJK
BOMBARD TROYON.
1
Berlin, (wireless to Sayville),
', Sept. 24.—Official announcement
yesterday says the German artil
lery successfully bombarded
Troyon Les-Paroclies, camp Des
Remains, Liourville.
i) mux
MUST DELIVER THE GOODS OR THE VERY ADVERTIS
ING ITSELF WILL PUT HIM OUT OF BUSINESS
mm
S*1 9
THE
MMHAIKD THAT HOVEWNT ON
THAT Md SUCCESSFUL
Berlin Denies That Enveloping Movement Has Been
Successful=-Furious Assaults by Germans In
The Vicinity of Verdun
Further successes of the allies, which are attempting
right wing, are claimed in an official announcement at Paris.
allies western wing has advanced considerable and that Peronne has been taken
after a desperate resistance.
Peronne is seventy-five miles north of Paris and twenty-five miles north of
Lassigny, near where the advance by the allies was announced yesterday in an offi
cial statement. The position at Peronne indicates the movement of the allies' left
wing, which is much farther north than their main battle line.
In the turning movement of the Franco-British forces, which first was direct
ed against General Von Kluck in an effort to envelop his army, it appears from un
official dispatches, have met added resistance from some more German reinforce
ments.
Cettinje announced that its Montenegrins defeated the Austrians, capturing
Pattzhof, near Sarajevo, the capital of the Austrian province of Bosnia.
Petrograd issued a statement saying that after the capture of Jaroslau, the
Russian cavalry is pursuing the Austrian rear guard, inflicting heavy losses. There
is considerable doubt regarding the exact situation in the eastern theatre of war, as
the Petrograd, Vienna and Berlin reports are conflicting.
A dispatch from Petrograd to a Paris paper says the Germans, who drove
the Russian invaders from the east, have in turn been defeated and are evacuating
East Prussia to reinforce the line from Thorn, in West Prussia, to Kalisz, in Rus
sian Poland.
A news dispatch from Paris says that among the prisoners recently arriving
in Paris, is the general of the staff of General Von Kluck.
The unofficial reports say Zeppelins, evidently reconnoitering, have been
sighted from various points in Jutland, Denmark.
|London, Sept. 24.—The Reuter correspondent at Berlin sends the official re
terman army headquarters, dated last night:
righ£ -wing of the German west army has been engaged with the French
», tTehvfeto0e.it.-.
the east of the Argonne region, Var^nnes was captured and the attack*
JS proceeding. There has been no decisive actiomat any point.
German troops attacking French forts south of Verdun victoriously repuls
ed a violent counter-attack, made from Verdun, Toul, and across the river Meuse.
Heavy artillery was used against Troyon, Les-Paroches, Camp Desromaine and
Luneville, and was visibly successful.
"In French Lorraine, and on the Alsace frontier, the French advanced guards
fiave at some points been repulsed."
The enemy a few days ago succeed
ed in entrenching himself In a strong
ly fortified position oh advantageous
ground, and the French three-inch
guns found great difficulty in dislodg
ing him.
Late reports from the front indi
cate that they have been driven into
the rough country, which again lends
itself peculiarly to defensive-entrench
ment and the artillery duel has been
resumed with great vigor.
The encircling maneuver designed
to turn General Von Kluck's line is
continuing with success.
Violent Fighting Continues.
Violent fighting continued all day
where the rival armies are in con
tact, north of Noyon. and the enemy
is fighting with undiminished gallan
try against the ever-present danger
of being cut off. Also, 'there is the
growing peril of .a stroke from the
rear, which. unofficial reports declare
is 'being directed from Amiens, where
the French are moving southeast to
ward St Quentin to cut the railroad
line of supply of the Germans through
Belgium.
The allies have gained all alonar the
line, but at terrible coat
The German attempt to pierce the
'.
TEN PAGES—PRICE FIVE CENTS.
SAY GERMAN LINES STILL ARE FLINCHING.
Paris, Sept. 24.—The formidable forces of the Germans, which
were thrown against the allies' left, still are flinching, according to
official communication, under the unrelenting blows of the France
English battering ram.
Even the famous sniards, as in the battle of Marne. were unable to
stand the pressure, giving a little more ground every day.
A diversion attempted in Lorraine, having proven ineffectual, the
Germans are now making a fierce drive in the Woevre district, north*
east of Verdun.
DESPERATE RESISTANCE IS OFFERED.
Paris, Sept. 24.—The allies hare advanced along the western wing,
occupying the town of Peronne, despite desperate resistance, accord
ing to official announcement of the French war department this aft
ernoon. At the eastern end of the battle line in France, there has
been heavy fighting on the river Meuse, the allies alternately advanc
ing and retiring.
GERMANS MAKING FURIOUS ATTACK.
Paris, Sept. 24—Eleven miles—a
mile a day for the eleven days dur
ing which the battle has been in
progress—have been gained by the
allies in their attack on the right
wing of the German army under Gen
yal Von Kluck. Official reports yes
terday-Indicated that, from a pitched
battle, or series of battles, the en
gagement along the Aisne and the
Oise has become a siege—a battle of
hidden guns.
London, Sept. 24.—Interest in the fighting today centers in Woevre,
says the Bordeau correspondent of the Times, where the enemy is
making a serious effort to pierce the lines of the forts linking Ver
dun and Toul.
"To the northeast of Verdun," the correspondent continues, "east of
the Meuse heights. In the directions of Mouilly and Dampierre. their
furious attempts have failed. In the south of Woevre tbev hold line
positions running through Richecourt, Seicheprey and Lironvrille. The
general situation remains unchanged."
MONTENEGRINS TAKE AUSTRIAN POST IN BOSNIA.
London, Sept. 24.—An official report issued at Cettinje, telegraph
ed here by Reuters, states Montenegrins operating in Bosnia, after a
hot engagement, took the town of Prattzlio, which is in the imme
diate neighborhood of Sarajevo, where defeated Austrians have taken
refuge after abandoning a large number of dead On the field.
Hil gl
E
EVENING
EDITION
v. ,«*«
to turn the German
It is stated that the
French front near Rheims has been
abandoned. The fighting here has
been confined to artillery action, the
German fusilade acting ae a screen
for a general retreat, which is immin
ent, if, indeed, it has not already be
gun, as indicated by reports from the
front This retreat is olanned to'
cover the avenues of escape of the
German right wing and the army of
the crown prince, both of Which are
in great peril.
Preparing for Retreat.
General Von Kluck is believed to
be preparing for'a precipitate retreat
to a new line of defense, probably
with Valenciennes as its base. His
strongest position now is in the angle
of the Aisne and the Olse.
The French left on the right bank
of the Oise, is swinging its line around
until the center rests on the heights
of Lassigny. From this point the
most violent offensive movement ha*
been directed.'while the allies on the
left bank of the Oiee arid north of the
Aisne have been content to hold their
entrenched portions.
Heavy withdrawals of troop* have
been made -by the kaiser from Lor*
ralne in an endeavor to strengthen the
lines of Von Kluck and Von Buelow.
but it is not believed this will make
any material change in the situation,
because of the fact that the allies
practically outnumber the 3«rms.ns
two to one on the western center of
the line.
More than a million French and
British troops are engaged alone the
whole battle front, and a half mlUlon
more are being held In reserve to re-
(Continued on
P«o 7.
#•',

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