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Grand Forks daily herald. (Grand Forks, N.D.) 1914-1916, April 13, 1915, Image 2

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-PAGE TWO.
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M*-
6 FEARED TO
Alsatian Baron, Wounded
While Fighting, Bed Fel
low of Dying Frenchman
By Herbert Corey.)
(Copyrt|bt, 1916, by Herbert Corey.)
Berlin, April 13.—"We came to a
llttle iiin ln France," skirt the baron.
"It. '.was bitterly cold, and my clothes
were still wet with the mud of the
tratcb.'I Buffered greatly."
That the baron is still alive is one
of'the miracles -with which this in
credible war is filled. He is an Alsa
tian. is the barbn—a high-colored, lus
ty,^-bachelor buck—an excellent offi
cer 'but somewhat less completely a
•pidler than is the usual German. His
French is rather better than his Ger
ntjkh, although he is German to the
last thread. He glossed over the early
bits of narrative.
"Me," said the baron. "I-, I was a
fool. The trench was quite deep, and
I had been sleeping in the understand.
I was very safe. Then, because 1 wak
ed up and wished to acquaint myself
With the situation, I thrust my head
out of a loophole."
A French rifleman was on the look
out for just such an excellent target.
His bullet caught the baron in tho
middle of the .throat—by the side of
that cartilaginous lump known as Ad
am's apple. The baron bled a great
deal. It was six hours before it was
possible to lift him out of the trenches
and take him to the rear, for the ap
proach trenches had not been com
pleted. A soldier of his company went
with him. There were no ambulances
at the fatoment.
"I, have the cart of an excellent
His New Bedfellow.
The. baron had begun to drift off
Into unconsciousness, in spite of the
raw cold and pain. He knew the bleed
ing must be stopped. So the soldier and
the surgeon took him down from the
cart, while the kind peasant drove off
cursing into the night. In the dingy,
candle-lighted common room of the
THE MISERY
OF INDIGESTION
STOP'
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Heartburn and .Dizziness.
Dr. feiewe's Golden -Miidicai Discov
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treatment of indigestion, that thou-'
eands of former-sufferers owe their
good health of today to its wonderful
power, and testimonials prove it..
It arouses the little muscular fibres,
into activity and causes the gastric
Juices to thoroughly mix with the
food you eat, simply because it sup
plies the stomach with pure, rich
blood that causes stomach weakness.
Get good blood through the use of
Dr. Pierce's Golden Medical Discov
ery, and you will have no more indi
gestion.
Tt is the world's proved blood puri
fier. Start to take It today and before
another day has passed, the impurities
of the blood will begin to leave your
body through the eliminative organs,
and In a few days you will know by
your steadier nerves, firmer step,
keener mind, brighter eyes and clearer
\«kin that the bad blood is passing out,
and new, rich, pure blood is filling
your veins and arteries.
The same good blood will cause
pimples, acne, eczema and all skin
eruptions to dry up and disappear.
ODr. Pierce's Golden Medical Discovery
is the helpful remedy that nearly
everyone needs. It eontatns no alco
hol or' narcotics of any kind. It
cleanses the blood and every organ
through which the blood flows is bene
fited. Get it today at any medicine
dealer in liquid or tablet form.—Adv.
Dr. Pierce's 100-page illustrated
book. "The People's Common Sense
Medical Adviser," is sent free on re
ceipt of 3 dimes, or stamps, to pay
cost of mailing only. Address Dr.
M. Pierce, Buffalo, N. Y.
Fits Guaranteed
Hand Saws
A. B. Rheinhart
the Beat and Cheapest
Titaks
*C 1 t* f/J^ •t+'ft. .... ...*''..
and Vafim
Jb!eH*howald
WJ*
:«8f
Inn they found a dosen soldiers
stretched upon the floor. None had
been seriously injured. They swore In
a dosan tongues.
"There Is a better room upstairs,"
said the Burgeon.
The soldier and the surgeon carried
him up the dark and winding stairs.
It wag a dainty room into which, he
was taken, the baron remembered. He
tried to visualize it* occupant before
he drifted-off again. He woke to And
himself trying to frame a gallant
apology to her for his profanation of
her little room. The surgeon and the
soldier had removed his clothing and
bathed him and dressed his wound.
The soft, fragrant linen was inexpress
ibly grateful to his fevered flesh.
"We are in luck, my captain," said
the soldier. "This is not an army hos
pital. It is but an inn, and this good
doctor is doing what he can for. the
sufferers who come. There are but
few, for no one knows."
Time passed. The baron awoke to
And the surgeon and the soldier bend
ing over him. There was something in
their faces that he could not quite
fathom. The room was but dimly light
ed. His-eyes were faint from weak
ness. By an effort he aroused himself
to know that the surgeon was begging
a favor, almost apologetically.
"If you would permit yourself to
share a bed' with another wounded
man," the surgeon said.
The baron was past earing. But his
eyes sought the -face of the soldier.
The soldier nodded. "It-is quite all
right, my captain,"'said he.
He 'doean't 1ust remember what fol
lowed. He knows that he was lifted
from between' those adorably fresh
sheets and carricd down a hall into a
large room—the state department of
the inn. The great four-poster bed.
with its heavy canopy, and the rich
curtains, and the quaint, old-time fur
niture told as much. Upon the polish
ed table in the center laid the helmet
and accoutrements of a French
cuirassier. His spurred jackboots were
limp upon the floor. As the curtains
of the bed were parted the baron
caught a glimpse of a heavy, strongly
marked face upon the pillow—a face
with high, Gallic cheekbones and dark
expressive eyes and a sweeping mus
tache. A sheathed sword lay by the
side of this man upon the bed.
"Welcome, German," said this man
in a strong voice. "Are you noble'."'
The baron rarely refers to his fam
ily. But he has ail the pride of birth
that went to his Spanish forebears
three centuries ago, when they first
peasant," said the soldier, "who can- ...
not And the heart to refuse me. There |^'on
an
If-a field hospital back here. Let us *1™
They wandered on the back trail,
the baron lying in the body of the cart,
the soldier driving, the Kind peasant
walking behind, lifting up his voice in
protest. Ten minutes after they had
left the illumination of the rockets and
thre^ gunflre the night became impossi
bly
•ifli
estate and a title in a little
I self from his lethargy enough to snap
an assent.
"Good!" said the man in tho bed. "i,
too. am noble."
The soldier and the surgeon busied
themselves in making the pair com
fortable. The soldier placed the Can
dle in the corner of the room, so that
the baron's memory carries a tale of
dark. The soldier turned down a,.
1# road the peasant found for them '°ny flickering shadows playing on the
In:.the darkness. The baron's clothes
began to freeze. By and by they came
to the door of a little inn. Over it a
small-Red Cross sign was tacked. The
noisier hammered on the door. A
French surgeon came.
"iSnter," said he. "I will do what I
can."
cc-iling and moving as some draught
from without stirred the candle flame.
The doctor approached the bedside.
"I have done what I could," said he.
"Now I must go."
"Good-by, Pierre," said the other
man. "You are always kind."
There came silence in the room. The
great bed was very soft and very
warm. The baron gratefully gave way
t« sleep. Once the other man spoke, in
a harsh, rough voice that was no long
er strong. It seemed hardly mora than
a whisper to the baron, but that whis
per vibrated like the tang of metal
through the air.
"At least." said the whispering man.
"not alone.'1
Was He Afraid to Die Alone?
The. baron roused himself liv an ef
fort. He tried to turn his head, but the
stiff bandages about his neck prevent
ed. He could only see the'long shad
ows playing across the checked and
yellow ceiling, with its old plaster or
naments. He tried to ask .a question,
and then a swift conviction of the use-
8i^~
Ifcssness of it all came over him and find out -b^w muc
M.ga*jj -himsWf again to sleep. withatftndink tjie
''Onfce, later on, I felt a stir-at-my and*under4he stte
Side,"said the baron. "I knew that the
man stirred in the bed. But I. did not
waken., Hours afterward—it must' have
been hours, for the candle had'-fllclcer
ed out and the room was quite dark—
I awoke again. .My head was clear, al
though I was very weak. I lay there In
the great bed, groping in my memory
for the incidents of the previous day.
I remembered the harsh-voiced
Frenchman and the shadows against
the celling. I moved slightly—
"And then I found that one hand
was lying at my side and was tightly
clasped in the great hand of the
Frenchman. He was quite dead. His
hand had chilled and stiffened. We
laid there, quiet, hand in hand, until
my soldier came to say that he had
found and ambulance and I was to be
taken to our own field hospital.
"The explanation? I have none. But
in my own mind I always think of
that Frenchman as the man who fear
ed to die alone."
If the world owes us a living, why
not pull off our coats and proceed to
collect It?
"I Don't Feel Good"
a
BARGAIN COUNTER
Not How Big, Bat Oh! Ho* Good
la Suits or Overcoats at
THE FASHION SHOP
li ~is $17.00
a a of el us
Usually their bowels
only need cleansing.
ItexategtdeftEifi
will do the trick gad make you feel fine.
We know this positively. Take one
tonight. Sold only by us, 10 cents.
Dacotah Pharmacy.
DAILY
Have Your Overcoat Gleaned
Before you put ypur overcoat
away for the summer, «end It
c?e^dMsdndhVres,id !W'e'UUy
"EP THE PANT0R1UM
419 DeSfars Ave.
Send Us Your Shirts
and Gulfs
*OsvboM
iff Wkn liM J'..
Star Steam Laundry
Bonnet Shaj
Lace
Of the Meweat fltyles-and at Popular
V- :\.yjrtcea.
if??:
WMmm,
ma
f)*H' i' H**}'1
A
WAR DOES KOI
Berlin Building Subway
Many Structures Are
Going Up.
-w
Though Interest is intense in the big
news developments, second to this
comes the "soldier letter" sections in
the daily newspapers and columns ap
pear daily. The British censor scrup
ulously eliminates all mention of troop
locations in the soldiers' mail but this
fails to detract from the interest in
the subject matter.
How an old Belgian woman refused to
leave her home though German shells
had cut great holes in her dooryard,
was related by a private in the First
Wiltshire regiment. He called her
"mother Cavelier" and added:
"We tried to get her to go but It was
no good, it is her home and she
means to stay at all costs. She looks
upon us all. as sons and does every
thing for us—gives us food, dries our
clothing and even washes our under
wear."
How a terrific "battle of words"
raged between a Belgian and German
trench along the Yser was told by a
Belgian infantryman who wrote a
London newspaper about it. The
trenches were fifty yards apart. The
opposing soldiers contented themselves
with hurling abusive language until
the "battle" became so violent that
the Belgian colonel forbade his men
further verbal exchanges with the Ger
mans. The soldier concluded:
"It was a pity too, as it was a great
pleasure to tell one's enemy one's con
tempt and hate."
A private of the Seaforth Highland
ers wrote "home" how he had labor
ed to scratch out a few lines on a piece
of paper with a pencil when he slipped
and fell into the watery mud in the
bottom of the trench. He crawled
out, spent half hour finding his pen
cil and cleaning the paper then re
sumed the letter.
The fearful condition of the trench
es Is best revealed," he wrote, "by the
part of them I am sending home on
this letter."
A wounded London
wrote:
"Picture yourself, in all your
clothes, clotted with blood and dirt,
as dry as blotting paper, aching all
over and breathing forty to the min
ute, taken from a Bed Cross cart and
carried into a clean dressing room.
Berlin, April 13.—Foreigners who
come to Berlin now are astonished to
much con?truotten, not
ihe war, is gojpf ojjt In
apd*undeifcthe streets. The municipali
ty is building a subway under the
principal north-and-south street of the
city, and In carrying out this scheme
it has just torn away the chief bridge
over the Spree. It is also putting a
four-track tunnel under the famous
street Unter den Linden, so that it
shall no longer be impaired in appear
ance by the sight of street-cars cross
ing it. Further to the east another
subway is in course of construction
through very crowded business sec
tions one of the two great electrical
companies Is building it. It will con
nect the suburbs In the north and
northeast with those in the southeast.
Another important improvement has
been undertaken by the Prussian rail
way authorities—the enlargement of
the Friedrlch-Strasse station, the prin
cipal railway station in the heart of
the city. Here the enormous arched
roof has been torn away in order to
double the sise of the building. The
city of Berlin is engaged in other work
besides those mentioned above. It is
excavating a great harbor for canal
barged on the western side of the city,
after having opened a new one to the
east of the city only about a year ago.
It is also building a wholesale market
hall, a school of Industrial art, besides
about a half dozen other schools.
WELFARE WORK FOR
GIRLS NEAR CAMPS
London, April 18.—The National
Union of Women Workers has issued
an appeal for .more volunteers to look
after the welfare of girls in the neigh
borhood of soldiers' camps.
The work was started about three
months ago and has met with the cor
dial support, both civil and military.
The union now has 1,200 volunteer pa
trols engaged.
Lord Kitchener recently Issued a
general order Informing officers that
these women patrols were doing good
service and should have every possi
ble co-operation from the army offi
cials.'
U. S. INTERESTED IN
AN AUSTRALIAN LAW
Sydney, Australia, April 13.—Amer
ican interest in the Australian regula
tion of prices for food and articles of
common usage is evinced fay a letter
which has been received by the neces
sary commodities control commission
of New South Wales from Joseph E.
Davies, United States commissioner of
corporations.
Mr. Davies asks for information re
garding the law which created the
necessary commodities commission
and for reports upon its work. "These
will be of considerable value," he says,
"In connection with the organisation
of the federal trade eommlasion of
the United States recently provided by
law. I am sure that your experience
will be helpful In throwing light upon
some of tl|« p»bl*m» which the fed
eral trade commission is likely to en
counter."
RUNAWAY BOYS NOW
CHANGE DIRECTION
Berlin, April is.—Romantically in
clined German boya who/ run away
from home for a life of adventure have
changed their direction strice the out
break of the war. Formerly they al
ways went west, led astray' by cheap
tales about lighting the Indians and
life In the Bocky mountains now they
go east In order to get fearer to
Field Marshal Von Hindenburg.
Four mch ypungsters recently left
Neu-Koellit. a suburb of Berlin. Mot
having any ntoney they Cell upon a
newspaper vendor and robbed him of
11.75.. Tbat -iook theM lar as
hiankfort on the Oder, «*«t» -they
were stranded. Roaming in adjacent
village for food, they were arrested by
the poliee and sent bome to their par
ents. The keys said ttiiy tntMfded^o
go t» Eaat PrussU aid e|irty ^ater to
4
THE GRAND FORKS DAILY HERALD TUESDAY EVENING APRIL 13,
Letters From "Tommies" Give
Real Human Side of Trenches
BY WUiBURX S. FORREST.
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
London, March 24 (by mail toNew
York)—The human side of the trench
es and firing lines with their pathos
and laughter combined Is no better
told than by the "Tommies" at the
front, thousands of whose letters are
received weekly by the "folks bade
home."
How Women Braved German Fire
1"
Then the first Englishwoman you have
seen for four months cuts your clothes
off and send you to 'bed. It is like
crawling from hell to heaven."
A Lnace Corporal who was wound
ed at Ypres and Is again in the fight
ing line wrote:
"The more men we get here the
sooner the game will be at an end.
The Germane are almost sold out. We
captured, a few the other day and they
told us they didn't want to fight. They
were mere-boys/ -We only want nice
dry weather anift .'then am quite sure
we can finish up iflth brilliant vic
tory."
An Australian trooper in Egypt
said:
"We are camped' Just below the
pyramids, not thereat place in the
world although the"' great Napoleon
chose it once. The great drawback
is sand we drill on it, sleep in it, even
eat it. It causes sore eyes and bad
language and would eventually break
your heart.'1
Commenting on the British fur
coats furnished the troops, a London
private wrote:,
"I have been provided with a fur
jacket, quite'a "nutty" model. I re
semble something between a monkey
and an arctic explorer." It adds to the
weight to carry,, but is warm, which is
the main thing!"
H6w two womert:wlth stole fortitude
braved German shells.to sit beside the
coffin of a neighbor wpman was told
in an East $urrey
private's
letter from
France. The woolen sat silently be
side the bier in si room of a house
when "a Germati 'sheil burst outside
the front door".the .private added,
"and neither of tnem gave any notice
of it. "Another well shattered the
whole inside of tne ..house and the
staircase came doWn .' together with
some of the ceilings.' 1 saw the wom
en come out as white .as millers with
the duBt which had enveloped them.
Their escape was miraculous and
when the dust had been brushed from
them they re-entered, readjusted the
coffin which had upset and resumed
the vigil as though the occurrence was
all apart of the days work."
A member of the Royal Field Artil
lery and former shop employe after
explaining that he expected to bring
home a clock from the "town hall of
territorial Berlin" apologized for writing a brief
letter by saying
"There is no chance of asking the
foreman to give me a day off so I'll
have to stop where I am. You see we
are so busy this year in "our trade"
that we can't be spared as a matter
of fact we are working overtime."
QUEEN Of BELGIANS IS
AS ONE WEIGHED DOWN
WITH CRUSHING GRIEF
London, A]
Slain
I saw tlie
las," writes
the front
n. "I had
queen of Bel
Scotch soldier
to relatives In
gone up to the ruined cathedral
with one of my! officers for the
afternoon service. Wrhlle we were
there the queen,'.arrived.
"She came unexpectedly. No
one, so far as Ittjnr, dreamed of
her coming. She was dressed
with what I can only describe as
religious simplicity—a severely
costume aKl '.a tourist cap.
Belgian
as I could hear Ho word was
spoken*
"Her majesty fascinated me.
Shd was as one who ls weighed
down with grief her eyes were
the eyes of one who lias cried
long, and could cry no more. She
stood looking at tlie burned and
battered walls of the sacred build
ing, awe-inspired, broken, crush
ed. She acknowledged our salute
with a melancholy smile."
DIVER DARES CRUSHING
WEIGHT OF DEEP SEA TO
LOCATE WSJ SUBMARINE
Honolulu, April IS—In the des
perate efforts to recover the Ill
fated submarine "F-4" which
carried 21 men to a watery grave
in Honolulu harbor on March 26,
the unobtrusive courage of Jack
Agrax, a diver, stands out con
spicuously.
Agras descended 21S feet Into
the sea, with only a helmet on,
and for 18 minutes withstood the
tremendous pressure of water at
that depth while he made a nec
essary survey.
No other human being so far as
Is recorded, has gone that depth
with unprotected body and lived
to tell of his exploit.
Only .80 feet lower the plates
of submarines have bnclded un
der tlie ocean's weight—rivets
have broken.
And yet Agras, with amazing
nerve had only the arah or his
ribs to oppose that crushing
force his ribs and his sound
lungs. The green burden con
stricted bis flesh like this folds of
a monstrous python. It flatten
ed his abdomen. It sent the
blood roaring to his head. It op
pressed him with fetrange languor,
toward the last. But Agrax stuck
it out—until his work was fin
ished.
The great dredger chains, grop
ing with Mind hooks for the
sunken "F-4" had fooled, after
heartbreaking failure and delay
during which the imprisoned of?
tears and crew had perished,
Agras volunteered to slide down
the chain and lottte th« trouble.
A bungtesAne reinforced rubber
suit might hamper him. with
out,the suit there was appalling
danger.
Donning his helmet Agras slid
down—315 feet.' He 'hurried.
Like the other tollers above, he
was anxious to cad the suspense
of the bereaved watchers ashore,
even though all hope for life in
the "F-4,'had been abandoned.
So he forgot the craddug of-Ms
ribs and the roaring in his head,
and did hto work, «rith patient
opurate, as any otter hero might
have done under the tircum-
VISUALIZES LINES
OF WAR PRISONERS
Berlin, April It.-—To visualise the
number of Russian prisoners and guns
taken by von Hindenburg in the so
called "•winter's battle" to the east of
the Maaurian lakes, one of the Oer
man papers has figured out what a
great procession they would make.
If tne 104,000 prisoners, th« 800
Pisces of artillery,, ud tftfe 22,000 wa
gons, It says, wenCto form a pro
cession with, four men abrep
the artillery an*
marehlnfr order, they would'i
miles in length. it wduld
thirty hours for' stich a A
to pass a given bdlnt In i.„
way It is flfUiW tha**!J the»soners
require
N ICL »S *I 4
-•'VjVi V.
NO CHANGE II
MMTTOMY
Wheat Figures Firm at the
Start But Have Break
From High Point.
Minneapolis, April 13.—-May wheat
closed unchanged, July wheat 1-8
lower.
The wheat market was flrnt at the
start and May wheat soil up to tl.SO
1-8 but had a break of 1 l-8o from
the high point reached, with the riose
only 1-8 above the low point of the
session.
Crop continues favorablo and sprint:
work is progressing rapidly In the
spring wheat territory.
Liverpool cables were from 1-2 to
1 1-2 higher on spot wheat and' 'his
helped to brace the market at the
start.
The world's visible supply Of wheat
according to Bradstreets figures show
ed a decrease of 976,000 bushels for
the past week.
.. Clearances today were only moder
ate, the total of what and flour equal
ing 465,000 bushels.
SOUTH ST. PAtJIv MARKEi)TS.
St. Paul, Minn., April 13.—Hog re
ceipts, 4,400 steady to strong range
$7.00 to 7.10 bulk, $7.06.
Cattle receipts, 3 000 killers,- steady
to 10c lower steers $4.60 to 7.60
cows and heifers, $4.50 to 6.60 calves
60c lower $3.75 to 7.60 stocKerS and
feeders, strong, $4.50' to 6.76.
Sheep receipts, 100, steady lambs,
$4.00 to 9.60 wethers, $6.26 to 7.76
ewes, .$8,00 to 7.50.
Wheat'
Flax ..
DVLDTH STOCKS.
WINNIPEG CARS.
Week Year
Today. Ago. Ago.
Wheat 441 695 Holiday
Grand Forks Markets
(Prices for Saturday,-April 10.)
No. 1 northern.......
No.. 2 northern
No. 3 northern
Rejected
No grade
IV
ti jipar&it $
1*19,
.$1.40
..... 1.37
1.32
1.17
1.12
Durum Wheat.
No. 1 ....
No. 2 ...
No. 3 ...
No. 4 ...
Rejected
$1.45
1.40
1.35
1.16
1 1 0
64
'.'*.61'
.48
Barley.
46 lb. bright
.48 lb, bright
4l tl). bright
37 lb. bright
..... 46
Rye.
No. 2 ...
No. 3 ....
No. 1 northern
No: 2
No grade ...
Rejected ...
..... .98
..... .90
Flax.
.....'$1.71
1.68
1.63
1.58
Oats.
No. 3 white
No. 4 white
No. 3 mixed
No grade ...
..... .47
46
44
.43
S4n
What
f!'.
Want to move to.
Market Quotations
MAX WHEAT
Chi. Minn.
Open 1.50 i-®?*
High
1.81 1.501 l-5
Low ..1.5CI 1.49 1-684
Close .....1.56! 1.491, 1.501
jnn.Y WHEAT.
Chi. Minn. Dul
....1.241-1 1.49-t ....
...-1 24| 1.4SI 1.471
...,1.23| 1.42J 1.4JI
..1.23| 1.42f 1.47J
Open
High
Low
Close
SEPTEMBER WHEAT.
Chi Minn:
Opeh .....l.Ui-l 1.134
High 1.111 1.131
.Low .1.101 1.111
dole .....1.101 I.Ill
Open .....1.611 1.19
Close .....
1.50j-| 1.111
Close
Open
Dul.
1.131
M. LOOTS.
May. July.
Sept.
l!08'
KANSAS CITY.
'1 May. July.
Open .....1.48! 1.17J
Sept.
.1.47 1.l6i-| 1.041-1
N1CW YORK.
May. July.
1.621 1.32
Sept.
WINNIPEG.
May. July.
Close
Oct
.....1.531 1.601
CHICAGO CORN*.
May. July.
74-731 .761
..... .74 .761
.721-1 .76}
..... -711-| .761
Open
High
Low
Close
1.161
Sept.
761
.76
'.76|
OHTCAGO OATS.
May. July.
High
Low
Close
High
Low
Cloie
DtMJTO CARS.
Today. Tear Ago.
112 .39
20
no
Wheat increase, 30,000 flax,
change for two days.
Liverpool opening: Spot wheat 1-2
to 11-2 higher corn, 1 cent higiter
oats, 1 cent higher.
Sept.
.46|
.461
45|
..... .571 .641
..... .661 .53|-1'
661 .531
CHTCAGO PORK.
May. July.
.....17.60 18.02
Sept.
18.40
18.20
IT.32 17,80
17.32 17.80
J«.20
MINNEAPOLIS WHKAT.
Puts—May $1,471-1, calls $1,601.
WINNIPEG CLOSE.
1 northern
2 northern
8 northern
May oats
July oats ..
Flax, cash
July flax ..
Oct. flax ..
$ .521
1.61|
.... 1.481
.... .64—i
641
.... 1.7.61
,... 1.791
... 1.821b
MINNEAPOLIS CASH CLOSE.
No. 1 hard $1,641
No. 1 northern
Arrive, regular
No. 2 northern
No. 3 northern........
No. 1 durum, arrive.
No. 2 durum
No. 8 yellow corn ...
Arrive
No. 4 com
Arrive
No. 3 white oats
Arrive
No. 3 oats
Rarley ..i
Flax ........... ....
Rye and arrive .......
1.50| 01.541
1.50|@i 541
1.46191.511
1.891 @1.491
1.641
1.591$1.601
.681® .69
.681
.66
.68
.54
.541
.51
.66
1.98|(5)1.90|
1.07 @1.08
.671
..541
.52
.75
DULUTH CASH CLOSE.
No. 1 hard .......
No. 1 northern
No. 2 northern
Oats, cash
Rye
Barley
No. 1 durum ..
No. 2 durum ...
May
Sept.
July .......
Flax, cash
Sept. flax .....
July flax ......
11 »|fS
....$1.55,1
1.641
.... [email protected]!
.... .541® .55|
.... 1.06 @1.07
.... .60 .75
1.631
[email protected]
1 6 8 1
.... 1.141
...1.69
... 1.941
... 1.991b
... 1.981
You Do Now
Mr. Landlord
Will Mean Profit or Loss This Summer
May 1st will be&cre before you know it, and every flat, house or
duplex not leased by that date stands a mighty good chance of be
ing idle for morths~-eating-up money instead of earning it.
people, scattered all over Grand Forks are, going to move in
•v the/nea?t few weeks, and when people in Grand Forks make up their
minds to move, the first thing they do is to get a copy of the Her
ald and see what' places are available in the section of the city they
,In -insists
When renting time comes they look through the Houses For Rent
classification on the Want Ad Page* in the Hirajlii They know
that When they Want a fiat or house—no matter wh^t the price, or
^wH^t the ifcte, or what the lotatibn-^they can always find the list
worth while in Grand Forks, in the Herald Want Ad Page,
Mt^ Limdiord, jroiji can't afford to have your property vacant thia
suminier, gogetyour^lii^iigbtn
mgiOTWirW)
DTJIjTJTH FLAX
Close
Cincinnati. April
May
1.95!
NASHVILLE
ORDERED TO PA\
13.—The
national
baseball commission hire reversed tne
ruling of the national .board in
"sa'"
lowing the salaiy claim-of Player E.
M. Hemingway of the St. Louis Amer
icans against the Nashville club of
the Southern league
and
directed the
latter club to send its check for
$131.50 to the secretary of the com
mission for transmission to the play
er.
Hemingway, who refused to accom
pany the Nashville club on one of Its
trips, claiming Illness, was suspended
for insubordination. The commission
says they cannot approve .the suspen
sion of a player for insubordination
whose refusal to accompany his team
on a trip Is due to illness which con
fines him ..to his room, and says, fur
ther the Nashville club's arbitrary
course.' with the player was unjusti
fied and operated to a disadvantage of
the St Louis club, to whom the play
er had been: released, while under sus«
pension, as foeli as th.6 player himself.
AFTERNOON, CHATTER.
Mrs. Argue 'Isn't it terrible that
Ihe Bilks are separated?"
Mrs. Datue—"Yes, and he was with
in 800 tobacco tairs of gating a play
er-piano."
Ship Your Grain to
Chas E. Lewis & Co.
Grain Commission and Stock Brok
ers. Members All Leading
Exchanges.
MINNEAPOLIS, MINN.
Board of Trade Bide., Dulnth,
Minn.
Security Block,, (trand Forks, N. D.
AOOLPH 1LDSTAD, Mgr.
JOHN BIRKH0LZ
Money Always on Hand for First
Mortgage Farm Loans.
GRAND FORKS, ft. P.
s.l i'i'!
tin
ssS'

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