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Grand Forks daily herald. (Grand Forks, N.D.) 1914-1916, April 14, 1915, Image 1

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89074405/1915-04-14/ed-1/seq-1/

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NO. 80.
NUN ON
I ROE HAY
Tatives See Stranger Car
ried Out to Sea Off the
Arctic Circle.
tUNTERS TRY TO
RESCUE THE MAN
WiSJ.M &*>.
Irons Wind Sprints up, However, and
Carries Icc Far Ont to Sea—General
Belief Is that He ts a Member of the
Explorer's Party.
Nome,. Alaska. April 14.—Natives
*, hunting seals last winter are reported
iln mall advices received from Icy Cape,
f«n the' Avctic coqst, near latitude 70,
1
$
to have seen a white man marooned
on an ice floe which was drifting In a
southwesterly direction toward Wran
geli island.
Whether the man was a member of
Vilhjalmur Stefansson's Canadian, arc
tic expedition or was a survivor.of the
wrecked whaling schooner New Jer
sey, the natives were unable to de
termine., 8tefansson and two compan
ions are missing.
When the natives first saw the man
he was on a large lee pack separated
from them and the shore ice by a wide
stretch of-water. At first they thought
he was a hunter frrfm their tribe, but
upon reaching shore learned that the
man was not a native.
Carried Out to Sea.
The hunters' Immediately hurried
out onto, the ice to try to rescue the
marooned man, but before they reach
ed the lead separating the floe from
the shore ice, a strong offshore wind
had sprang up, carrying the Ice far
to sea.
The man was walking slowly in the
Same direction as the moving ice. The
natives were surprised that he had not
hailed them before the Wind widened
the distance between the' ice floe and
the shore ice.
The ice was moving steadily south
west and unless the wind shifted must
have touched Wr&ngell Island, where
food caches were left last summer by
the p&rty which rescued the survivors
from the wrecked Stefansson explor
ing ship Karlqk.
.Three. Men Missing.
The general belief here and: among
the natives at Icy 'Cape, is-that' the
mi^'w«s^.memh«r irf tlli^
ty of^rej whi&rtarted
aatasasrwtertwi
Nothing has* hew heard ,o( VUhjaK
mur Stefansson and his two compan
ions sln$e they.left. Martin Point a
y*ar ago to explore the unknown are
tic regions north of Alaska.
Stefansson expected to travel 160
miles north on the. ice, by .which tlnje
he believed the .eastward drift would
bring, him in to.uc.h .with Banksland,
but the early, spring.resulted in forty
to fifty, miles of open .water along the
coast .of Banksland'at the time Stef
ansson had calculated he would land.
CANADIAN SHIPS
YANKEE RIVALS
Cleveland, April 14,—Opportunity
for an American" monopoly of shipping
between ports in the United States and
South America Is threatened by Cana
dians, who now operate more than
half of the- Ships plying on the-Great
lakes.
Canadian vessel owners, anticipating
a long period of business depression in
the dominion as result of the war, de
clare they will send fifty ships through
the Wellarid canal, equip them for
ocean traffic, and go after the South
American trade.
At the present time there are on the
lakes over 100 Canadian vessels, each
of 2,200 tons capacity, which is small
enough to pass through the Welland
canal .and large enough for ocean traf
fic. Of the Oreat Lakes vessels owned
in the United States there are about
twenty-five of the same size.
Many of these Canadian boats will
be sent through the canal, down the
St. Lawrence and to the coast.
INTERESTING CASE
IN STATE COURTS
Aberdeen, 8. D., April 14.—An in
teresting: ease is to be fought-out in the
county and State courts this year for
the purpose of determining whether
or not a county can collect from the
estate of a deceased county charge,
moneys expended by the county for
the care, of such deceased at a state
.institution.
FLOOD WASHES IM
PART OF DAM OUT
Grand Rapids, Wis., April 14.—Be
cause of a sudden rise In the Wiscon
sin river, 100 feet of the Byron dam
went out In the night. Persona livihg
near the river expected one of the old
.. time .floods which early settlers re
member with horror. Fortunately,
however, no damage was done in spite
of the fact that the water rose-four
feet in a short time.
r:Diydbck Pwrini^
k^rt N^^rt^Llrhe^:
•1
SQtlOOS ACCIDENT ON
(M NORTHERN IS
I IHM.Y AVERTED
Williston, N. D., April It—The
two rear coaches of the Great
Northern Oriental limited, east
bound, left,, the rails near Todd,
seven of Willistoni. late
Tuesday, rtrain was mak
lnit high speK&
Only one was
slightly injured, al»iAJ!g|eN
being slightly
erwlse no rtataiagu was dc
Hie derallnpent is most
able, as the two ooaohes bounde
along the ties for some distance,
the derailment setting the air
brake and bringing the train to
stop quickly, it is believed spread
rails caused the accident.
WAR NAIDBALS
BONG MADE
0. S.FACTORIS
Westinghouse Airbrake Co.
Filling Special Contract
Order.
Pittsburg, April 14.—A number of
manufacturing concerns In the Pitts
burgh district confirmed to the Asso
ciated Press today,' reports that they
are filling large orders tor war' ma
terial. At the Westinghouse Airbrake
company, It was said that special ma
chinery was Installed and the work
ingmen now are making sharpnel
shells, cartridge cases and fuses on a
contract that require,, a year to com
plete. The shells will be loaded by
experts in Europe.
A number of smaller concerns are
making ammunition also, and some
shops are working at high speed to
fill the demand promptly.
COTTON NOT ON
C0NTMKMILIST
Military Advantages to be
Gained not Sufficient is
^.^Britfeh OpiiuOTi'
.v-,
.' 1.4i-rr-TliVl|i(ltish gov
ernmerit debidsd: against placing cot
ton on contraband in answer to a ques
tion asked'in the house of-commons
this afternoon on this subject. Neil
Primrose, under-secretary of foreign
affairs, on behalf of the foreign office,
replied. that, i^ftpr careful considera
tion, It was found .that the military
advantages to be gained by declaring
cotton contraband1, were insufficient to
render such a ritep expedient.
MINE CAVES IN
SIX MEN INJURED
Calumet, Mich., April 14.—Two men
are dead today, two are fatally Injured
and two may recover, following a
cave in of "black wall" In the Hecla
branch of the Calumet & Hecla mine.
The location of the accident was more
than a mile underground.
IMA IAD OUT
Boy Wanted to Visit Father
and Disappears—Stop
ed at Fargo.
Fargo. N. April 14.^-Longing to
visit his father, whom he had not
seen for many months Russell Book
er, a IS-year-old' l«td of lakota, drew
from the bank $60 his entire savings,
and started to jolA'hls parent who is
now resldUi? at tfalckihfcw, 111
He got as "far
AS
W
"FAtgd when the
police who had been notiBed to be on
the lookout, boarded No. 4 of the
Oreat Northern ahd found him. He
was taken to the Station
"where he told
his story to the desk' ser&eant.
He Worked faithfully on a farm last
summer and had put-his earnings,into
a savings bank, his object being, he
said, to
go
to his father at the earliest
opportunity..'
•,. The .lad when taken into custody-by
the police had the remalnderofthe
$60 on his person, a box of cartridges
and a hew cane suit case, containing
his simple wardrobe. His ticket read
Chicago.
His parents have been Separated
about two years. Mr. Booker had'
gone to- Illinois to seek employment
and. Mrs. Booker had charge of. the
child.
MISSING MAN ON
BICYCLE
Raider
®!au Claire, Wis., April 14.—Friends
learned today that Rev. J. Ellsworth
Brokaw, minister, who disappeared
trom
Caddott, near' here, 'several
weeks %go, had gone to Florida There
his destination was lost, the only cliie
being the report that he had started
from Florida to southern CsJlfornia on
Wcyele. ,(V.
lite.
4 t-
irr^'V .•-
WNKUfDAHI
OTKKCA
DID
Major General Frederick
Funston Goes to Border
to Take Charge.
BULLETS DO
LITTLE DAMAGE
Machine Guns, Rifles and Many
Horses and Mnles Are Also Taken,
According to Reports That Come
From Matamoros to the Oarrsnxa
Agency.
Washington, Aprit 14.—Major Gen
eral Frederick Funston, commanding
the American forces on tlie Mexican
border, is en route today from San
Antonio to Brownsville, Tex., to take
personal charge of the situation there,
which' again has become threatening
in consequence of the Mexican bullets
that fell In American' territory. In
reporting to the war department,
Funston said: "Although the bullets
struck the Brownsville side during the
fighting yesterday, no casualties oc
curred."
According to reports from Matamo
ros to the Carranza agency, a sortie
against the Villa troops yesterday re
sulted In the killing of 300 besiegers
and the capture of many prisoners,
with 200 horoes, 60 mules, 4 machine
guns, a large number of rifles and a
quantity of ammunition.
THE "WEAKER" SEX.
Boulder, Colo., April 14.—Scholas
tic honors to be girls, again. The
smartest students at the University of
Colorado, according to official marks,
are the women students, with an aver
age of 81.03. The general average
of the men was 77,15. Members of
fraternities, however, averaged lower
than athletes and non-fraternity men.
TODAY'S ODDEST STORY.
Goshen, Ind., April 14.—John
nie Wolf Is approaching the age
of 20 months and Is sound and
happy. He didn't have a frog in
his throat It was In his stomach.
The youngster began losing
weight despite a hearty appetite,
and mother had visions of a tape
worm- The boy's stomach was
.photographed via X-ray,, and a
big lump was seen. Doctors: op-
ifvOVv'tv
•y£vs-i:
'f
a?
•'*$
mn't
UV1KC CHANCE FOR
11^
H.
".f4.
V".T
•htF%
too-
'.Mjf
*.•: lA't-v
*s
.• erAted wd brought. out a halt
*rpounl iiii
Mrs. Harry Wolf believes John
nie swallowed a tadpole when
they visited Mrs. Robert .Gregory,
his grandmother, in .Syracuse.
They drank hydrant' water there.
Crew of Kroonland Arrested
on United States Warrant
Served on Captain*
JMiZ tp
BROKE ALIEN LAB6R
STATUTE IS CHARGE
For Each Allen Employed, Company
is Subject to Fine of $1,000—Red
Star Iiiner.Transfers Them to the
Steamship Finland.
New York April 14.—Seventy-seven
men and women, virtually the entire
force of stewards and stewardesses
aboard the American liner Kroonland
were placed under arrest by the im
migration officers on a warrant on the
captain, charging, the Red Star line
owners of the vessel,-with violation of
the alien contract labpr law.
The entire complement of stewards
and stewardesses, numbering sixty
I nine men and eight women, it is charg
ed, were brought in as passengers on
board the liner Finland last January
from England.. After they arrived here,
it is charged, the Red Star liner trans
ferred them, in accordance with a
previous agreement, to the Kroonland,
thus violating the. law. A conviction of
the charge carries-with it a penalty
of $1,000 flne:for each alien employed.
THBVWvtfk
Jiortti
Dakhtsrr.
Thursday, wwtlkM tlo»tottigtit.
... UMVT5RSlT?JlEATraGS
7 a. m., 42 maximum, (S min
imum, St wind southeast, 15
miles barometer, X0.06.
VILA SOLDERS BUTCHERED AFTER
WG, SAKS MEXICAN DEWS
Laredo, Texas, April 14.—
Information from Carranza
officers indicated that three
hundred and fifty of Villa's
soldiers, who had surrender
ed after yesterday's battle be
tween the Villa and Carranza
armies near Huisashito,
thirty miles south of the bor
der, together with a nuhib^r
of Mexican wonien, various
ly estimated at eighteen,
were summraily executed by
the Carranza forces.
A Carranza general order
ed machine guns turned.upon
one party of the surrendering
Villaistas. Another killed
one hundred and twenty with
a machine gun while other
Carranza commanders used
revolvers freely and the
Wounded were bayonetted on
the field.
Americans returning from
the Huisachito battlefield
said they saw bodies of dead
Villa soldiers, which appar
ently had been bayonetted
after being shot. These same
Americans said that soldiers
on the field told them that
many prisoners were execut
ed yesterday.
It was said that Herrera's
losses yesterday were 25
killed and 42 wounded. He
flanked, the Villa troops with
about 1,000 soldiers, 500 on
either side, and simultaneous
ly the Carranza soldiers
opened upon the Villa troops
with machine guns from an
armored train.
3 Pounds Granulated
•V
Did Yqu Discover, the Merchant
Who Made That Offer in His
Ad a S in no
A certain merchant in Grand Forks offered
yottthree ipou«4s. of granulated sugar free with
the purchase of'6 quarts of cranberries at 50c.
Si'^Did you accept the sugar?
|§". .V
W AD REAPERS GET THE BEST.
'V' f•:
Everyday you!51i
price ne^'bargain hewisf that means vaittaj^lelir
in|o^rnfttibn ^r-you.
,''
'f'
v,
:interesttng
style
:ttews,|i-
1
if®
WPHTH W DAKOTA't tt^tjffittT* W NEWSPAPER
GRAND FORKS. N. D., WEDNESDAY EVENING, APRIL 14, 1915. EIGHT PAGES—PRICE FIVE CENTS.
THAT GOUKTRV
ITALIAN YOUTH IS
miiroFHWMit
Shot Fanner in Shack near
Port Arthur—Makes
Confession.
Port Arthur, Ont., April 14.—Amelia
Palma, who was on trial for the mur
der of William Leihtenen, a Finnish
homesteader on the Kamlnistiquia,
made a dramatic confession of his
guilt under the ordeal of the trial for
his life before the assize court.
In the afternoon Palma denied the
charge and gave a confused account
of his movements on the day of the
crime. In his confession later he im
plicates the wife of the murdered man
with whom he alleged he was infatu
ated. He claims she. offered $300 to
anyone who would murder her hus
band.
Mrs. Leihtenen was summoned to
appear as a witness at the trial, but
did not appear. A warrant has been
issued for her arrest.
In the confession which he made.
Palma alleged Mrs. Leihtenen gave
him. the money with which he bought
the revolver to slay her husband.
HUSH*
RABSBAUflll
Three Civilians are Killed—
Two Teutonic Airmen
Are Captured.
Paris, April 14.—It is officially
stated:
"A Zeppelin airship threw bombs on
Baiileul. a town in France, depart
ment of Nord, near the Belgian tron
tler, its objective being our aviation
ground, but this was not hit."
"Three civilians were killed. Two
German aeroplanes were forced to
come to the ground within our lines,
one near Braine and the other near
Luneville. In both cases the aviators
were taken prisoners. A third German
flying machine was winged by the Are
from our advance posts and fell near
Ornes. One of the aviators was hit by
a bullet."
MINE EXPLOSION KILLS
IP PERSONS
Petrograd, April 14.—Fifteen per
sons were killed last night by an ex
plosion in an illicit alcohol distillery
at Volkhova, a suburb of this city.
Serious damage was done by the lire
which followed the explosion.
CAWlfE
STUFFS CONNS
German Material, Ordered
Before English Embargo,
Comes Through. •/.'
Washington, .April 14.—Arrange
ments were completed for the ship
ment to America of two cargoes of
German dye stuffs which were paid
for by the American importers before
March 1 and are-now at Rotterdam.
They were not subject to scrutiny by
the British. as they were purchased
befogs the BWtish.order in the council
was
effective.<p></p>Mcoierwiiifiis
Chleaxo, April 14.—A lockout of
2,000 union, sheet metal workers went
into affect today as the result of an
order issued yesterday by the Building
Construction Employers' association.
The lockout' was deolared over the
protest ,of sheet metal contractors
whose agreement with the workers ex
pired on
i."
CAN
'••M,
'H
START WORK SOON
lON
NEW HOSPITAL
Thief River
Work on the new-?
.hosplUl ls t« b* tarted lmmed
r.it was- announseA'Today. Bd A.
un secured ths «eaeral eontr*et,
the WlsuLThomnsM Co., ibis tieMiny
.Holte.aadOeM«e]^ieptanih-
1
tft"
PINK DIM ALONG MM SO
Cw^p^Sdttit^&Qrs Officers
Never Lived Better than
EDITION
'j
UEVEENGUSH
BE FLOODED MUSGOVIIES GAM
BIG AfiVANTACE BY SlAStnC AUSTRIAN RIGHT FUNK
Left Now Exposed to Advancing Slavs-Expect Hragaty
To Declare State of Seige-Neove Chapelle Proves
German Line is Vulnerable
Basel, Switzerland, April 14.—German military
authorities, according to advices reaching here, have
begun the reconstruction of the formidable fortress at
Istein, five miles from here on the Rhine. Furthermore,
the river Rhine is being dammed so that when certain
sluice gaites are closed, wide stretches of the surround
ing country can be flooded. Observers here are express
ing the opinion that these preparations are in anticipa
tion of the French offensive being successful.
NEUVE CHAPELLE BIG VICTORY.
General Headquarters British Army in France,
April 14.—In the trenches along the British front,
sprawling from Ypres to Labassee, officers and men
alike still are talking of the battle last month at Neuve
Chapelle. The officers characterize this British victory
as likely to be regarded as the greatest local success of
the war, and privates hail it as evidence that the German
line can be broken whenever their leaders decide that
^this must be done, and that t^e ground gained will qu
weigh the inevitable losses sustained.
Lemberg, Galicia, April 14.—In a desperate at
tack by the Russians on the right flank of the Austrian
position in Mezolaborecz on the Hungarian side, east
of the Beskid mountains and about fifty miles south of
Przemysl, the Austrians were forced after a twelve
hour battle, and are making a precipitate retreat. The
whole of the main crest in this district, which the Aus
trians considered impregnable, now is in Russian
hands.
The main body of the Austrian army then moved
to Rostoka, where it found the Russians prepared in a
strong defensive position, and they again were repuls"
ed. Another attack was made by the Austrians in the
southern district of Uzsok and Veretzkim, and it met
with a similar check, the Russians occupying a position
three miles from Uzsok.
The left flank of this Austrian army, under the
command of Arch Duke Joseph Ferdinand, is being
gradually exposed by the Russian advances toward
Bartfeld and Gummino.
TO IHGIjARE STATE OF SIEGE IN HUNGARY.
Rome, April 14.—(Via Paris)—A dispatch from Trent telegraph*
ed from the frontier to the Idea Nazionale quotes an official who haa
just returned
trom
Berlin, (ilt lfRln), April 14*»
Leenard Adelt, coTrsspondsat of the
fct 'the
headquarters, asnds turhia hewsiftp**
»unW
o*'t»i ii»«^ mi ..
Vienna as authority for the statement that state
of siege probably will be proclaimed soon in Austria because of the un
rest resulting from the Russian advance across the Carpathians. Weal
thy Hungarians arc said to be making hasty preparations for the fight.
It further says that It is learned from the same source flat Em
peror Francis .Joseph decided to cede to Italy the so-called "Italian
provinces," Including Fiume, but only on condition that Italy Join with
Austria and Germany tn prosecuting the war. This report is
in Rome to be entirely without foundation.
PE7TROGRAI DENIES CLAIM.
Tondon. April 14,—The Austrian announcement to the effect
the Russians were checked in the Carpathians is disputed at rw«ypi
where it is said further advances were made. On account of the strong
forces of the Austrians and Germans massed at Uzsok Pass, the Rus
sians were unable to force their way through.
The east Russian official report announced the capture of tlam
villages and 2,700 prisoners in the lighting line near Visok.
The British parliament meets today for the consideration of
Important' collateral issues presented by the war. It is expected
the liquor problem will he discussed.
In the western arean of the war the allies have done little in the
last two or three days beyond the consolidation of positions, now In
their hands, preparatory to another effort to oust the Genmos
their entrenched position at St. Mihiel.
TO OOXSll/T COLONIES REGARDING PEACE TERMS.
When parliament re-assembled. Lewis Haroourt, secretary of state for
the colonies, promised that the dominions would be imaillul tally la
regard to the terms of peace.
Harold Tenmut, parliamentary under secretary for war, made the
announcement that there have been 1,546 promotions to wm"ltnlimn
from the ranks since the beginninK of the war. He also gave what is
regarded as a possible due to the intentions of the government con
cerning the drink question. He said that beer Is the only
now permitted in canteens, and it Is not the Intention
ot
to prohibit Its sale.
Premier Asqnlth annPonoed that the house will only sit for three
days' work.
Ht
r-.p.-jj
.f.
ti-v
the authorities
S-vss
capitulation was trebly over-garrison
ed and that the-officers had jlenfcyto
eat while 'this men hungered-
Herr Adelt, who professes to writs
on the basis of official Information
concerning the interval 'between th*
first and second aiegs, says the gar
rison during the first siege numbered
8 8,000 as had been contemplated, by
the antebellum arrangements,
experlencs of the first siegs, he *d)a.
showed not only that lh« rmliise ijl
could not have held lees men. but tWt i' y|
It also dsmonstrated the advisability
of enlarging ths^ works and Increasing si,
oorrespoodingly tbs numbsr
ot
'The aeldite«'°-aid
MM raflctea,.
bread nor
^te, even
yob Kusnu
the

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