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The nonpartisan leader. [volume] (Fargo, N.D.) 1915-1921, December 23, 1918, Image 14

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89074443/1918-12-23/ed-1/seq-14/

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ADVERTISEMENTS
^HERMAN
wSiBUILMINN
FULL VALUE
Courtesy and Comfort have
combined to make the New
Sherman the most popular
Hotel in St.. PanL
More one dollar rooms
than any other first
class hotel In St. PauL
Cafe and Cafeteria.
Angus J. Cameron
Fourth and 8ibley Streets
One block from Union Depot
and Nonpartisan League
Headquarters.
L. -J
Co-Operation
Spells Success
This is the reason that
we are urging you to
patronize your own sell
ing agency.
We know that if you
will give us a trial con
signment of grain or live
stock that you will be
come our steady cus
tomer. We have thou
sands of satisfied cus
tomers and would like to
add you to our list of
shippers.
Market quotations and
shipping instructions
will be forwarded upon
request.
Efidty Cooperative Exchange
St. Paul, Minn.
You Are Sorely Entitled to
the Full Market Value*
for Your Livestock
If you do not set It, somebody else sets
the benefit you should have. The day is
passed when business is done on sen ti
met!
t, and only results in dollars and
cents eount.
We want yon to compare the re
sults in dollars and cents we get.,
for you with those received else
where. A comparison will convince
—you that "Kirk Service" gets you
'•"the most money for your livestock.
1. Jt Kirfc Commission Co he.
Seuth SU Paol, Minn,
v- Authorised Sales Agency of ths:
American 8ocl«ty of Equity
FS3SS
I
few shots at this old political gas-bag
for peace of mind.
I am not able to work at present on
account of a relapse after an opera
tion for appendicitis and consequently
have read quite a little. Among other
things I have read several of Roose
velt's bitter attacks on the League.
I read the Leaders and then mail
them to different persons who do not
take the paper. On July 15 I traveled
50 miles to hear Mr. Townley and
Miss Jeannette Rankin and must say
it was the most patriotic speaking I
""ever heard. The collection for the
Red Cross amounted to $189.
G. S. COLEMAN.
Mr. Coleman's article follows:
We notice the colonel never loses
an opportunity to compare the farm
ers' organization—the Nonpartisan
league—with the Russian bolsheviki
|and the I. W. W. This kind of bunk
bo doubt sounds good to the copper
colored curs of Montana, but is only
an insult to thousands of patriotic
farmers in the Northwest, many of
whom have done as much toward win
ning the war as Roosevelt.
The colonel will find out that the
farmers and laborers have become too
wise to be caught on such chaff and
voodooism. This rough stuff'might
have worked 20 years ago, but the
people have been tricked by profes
sional politicians long enough. His
attack seemed to be directed mostly
at the leaders. He admits that -some
of the farmers are well meaning but
areNbeing misled. He probably thinks
the farmers should ask him tt choose
their leaders. They may be so ig
norant as to be misled, but still they
are too wise to be led by him.
He says he disbelieves in* any party,
especially if it calls itself a nonpar
tisan party, which organizes a single
class against other classes and seeks
to appropriate political control in its
own union. Wrong again, colonel, it
does not organize a single class
against other classes. 'Itbrings farm
ers and laborers together apd all
others who earn their bread by the
sweat xf their brows, and organizes
(Continued from page 9)
occasion for the attempted establish
ment of a new Australia in South
America.
THE BATTLE
IS ON
The trade anions were becoming
an important factor in the mines,,
in the building trades, in the ship
ping industries and among the
agricultural workers. An Em
ployers' federation was formed,
and backed by all the power of the/
government. Its watchword was*
that„they would "have the right to
employ whom they please arid to
pay what they choose without
being questioned on the matter by'
anybody
."They were determined
not to tolerate any combinations.
of labor.
On this determination being an
nounced trade unions developed more
rapidly than ever.- The organization
of a Nfitidnal Federation of Labor had
been undertaken. The employers ar
ranged for a universal'- lockout under
the agreement not to reemploy any
workingman on any task whatsoever
in all the Australian world
Montana Farmer Answers Roosevelt
Declares the Time Is Passed When the Farmers Gould Be
Influenced by Rough Stuff and Galling Names
Moiese, Mont.
DITOR Nonpartisan
Leader: You will find
inclosed some comments
on Roosevelt's recent
speech at Billings, be
cause I need to fire a
ivertteers pagr FOURPBK'/
them against food speculators, grain
gamblers, crooked politicians and all
other war profiteering- scoundrels.
He insinuates that they are seek
ing to appropriate political control in
their own union. We will say it is
not necessary for us to fight against
political control for our own union, as
the colonel and the war profiteers will
do that. He seems to think it hor
rifying that we seek political control.
Seeking political control was all O. K.
a few years ago when he was seeking
control of the Republican party for
nomination for president and Taft
beat him. He was sometimes called
a trust-buster, but the trusts did well
under his rule.. The only thing he
ever busted was the Republican party.
He did good job at that and threw
the political power to the Democrats.
When the colonel threw his hat in
the ring against. Taft he., evidently
thought he was a moose, but when
he saw he was beaten he tried to bull
things through and
c~who
Btart
anew party,
hence the appropriate name Bull
Moose.
Say~ colonel, what's become of your
Bull Moose? He's a stag" now, isn't
he? According to the press reports
the colonel said there .is not a Ger
man abroad or a pro-German at home
does not wish success to the Non
partisan league under its present con
trol. We suppose he or some of tho
copper-colored curs of Montan^are
authors of this misleading statement..
We could say with as much
What
Industrial Autocracy in New Zealand
s|
became of his Bull
Moose. G. S. COLEMAN.
CONGRATULATES MR. TOWNLEY
STARBUCK FARMERS' CLUB,
Souris, N. D. -..
Mr. AC. Townley, President,^.
National Nonpartisan League,
St. Paul, Minn.
Dear Mr. Townley:
Allow me to congratulate you on the
decidedly democratic step you have
taken, for I notice in the Courier-News
that you refused to accept the presi
dency of the League unless such office
be tendered you by the individual
members. The vote will be unani
mous. ..
This step will strengthen thf League
and weaken its enemies.
Wilfrneet you in Bismarck.
For this reason 1890 has become
the -most important date in AuS
tralasian history—it was then the
Tories attained the height of their
arrogance and their power and it
was then that the political power
of the workers challenged and dis
placed this masteryno| the mas
tors. •. jt*}
(The subject .of. the next article in
whatsoever- this series wjU.be "The Labor Govern
until trade)
DONT NEGLECT A
4M
J. C. MILLER.
unions should be everywhere aban
doned.
Atrthe last moiflent some of the em
ployers refused to carry out the agree
ment, whereupon demands were made
which forced, and was intended to
force, a general strike which lasted
six months and utterly paralyzed the
industry and commerce both Aus
tralia andNew Zealand for that whole
period of time. But prison bar£, bay
onets and starvation gave the seeming
victory* to the masters and all the
world said that the strike was lost.
This was not the case. The strike was
ied at once to the ballot box and in
ie succeeding elections jthe power of
the industrial and poUtical Tories was
I successfully challenged by the Labor
__party.
RHEUMATIC PAIN
*,f.- .'
1
,'A.
Go after it With Stoatf*
Liniment before it gcitt,.'..
dangerous
Apply a little, don't nib, let ft
trate, and—jgood-ty. twinge! Same for
external acnes, pains, strains, fHffnrw
of joints or muscleq» lameness, bruises.
Instant relief without muadness or
•died clothing. Reliable—the
selling liniment year after year,
nomical by reason of enormous sales.
Keep a big bottle ready at all times.
Ask your druggist for Sloan's Liniment.
Sloan's
Linitnent
30c, 80c and
%1M
EQUITY SHOES
We Eliminate the Shoe Profiteer
No Money in Advance
These Equity Work and Oat
door Shoes we such wonder
ful value that we send prepaid:
no money down. You will find
them so well made, stylish and
audi a big money-saving bar
gain that you mil
satisfied. Why pay
for shote not near
Great Shoe Offer
truth
that
every wild-eyed anarchist is wishing
success to Roosevelt and is trying to
find out
ThU shoe I* built to meet
the demand of an outdoor
city workers' "hoe as well
as for the modem
farmer. Built on
stylish lace Blucher
last Special tan
ning process makes
the leather proof
against the add In
milk, manure, soil.
(aiiolUe. eto.
Made by spe
cial process which leaves all the 'llfe" In the
leather and gives It wonderful waar-reslstlnr quality.
Very flexible, son and easy oo the feet They out
wear three ordinary pairs of shoes. Doubls ieather
soles and heel*. Dirt and water-proof tongue.
Heavy chrome leather tops, most comfortable. easiest
•hoes you ever won.
SP.NT1 'our name and address: and be
uuiij/ to send stxe you want Send nojn
Price of these shoes is $3.95 en arrival. Tou*!
be the Judge^of quality, style and value. Send'
e\
•f~- f!
sure
EQUITY SHOE CO,
Mlaaeapells,
Mia*.
TURN YOUR
POULTRY
INTO-CASH!
VV': WE WANT
FAT CHICKENS
DUCKS GEESE U!
TURKEYS
ALSO WANT CREAM,
/BEANS, VEAL, HIDES,
PURS, WOOL, PELTS
We Buy Outright
at Highest Prices
TOU ABB ALWAYS SURE OF
TOUR MONET IF TOU
"SHIP TO COBB"
THE E. COBB cli
Ow
ST. PAUL, MINN.
U. 8. FM Adaalnlstratlon Littaw
mn
TOU ABB LOOKING FOB
THE LAST CENT
saleaaun
win
1'
let tor TM tf n*
•Up
8a. St. Paul. Hfa*.
Chirac*. HL
PAY HIGHEST MAK-
.i «A fe""".
Wh«n: Wzf

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