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The nonpartisan leader. [volume] (Fargo, N.D.) 1915-1921, March 15, 1920, Image 8

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89074443/1920-03-15/ed-1/seq-8/

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ADVERTISEMENTS
Don't Sow
Foul Seed
Land once infested with weed seed
requires patient care and attention to
clean, and you can avoid this annoy
ance and raise better crops by cleaning
out the weed seed and the shriveled
grain with my grader. My machine
takes out the chaff and the imperfect
kernels of grain. Broken or small
grain will make good feed, but nobody
gets good crops by sowing them.
Get a Strese Grader
It cleans your seed by the air-blast
method. Heavy substances are dropped
in a separate container and the shriveled
and light particles are carried beyond
the seed box. Only the plump, perfect
grains are kept for seed.
Clean your seed with my grader and you
will greatly reduce the dockage when your
crop Is sold next 'fall. The machine should
pay for itself In one year by securing better
prices for you. I stand behind every one of
these machines and agree to refund the pur
chase price if the grader does not give satis
faction. Send for full particulars and prices,
and give the name of your dealer. Address
E. F. Strese Co.
1301 Central Ave., Minneapolis, Minn.
Anto and Tractor Mechanic
Earn 9100 to $400 a
Young man. are you
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Come to the Sweeney
School. Learn to be
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Do the work yourself,
that's the secret of the
SWEENEY SYSTEM
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LEARN A TRADE
SCHOOL OF AUTO-TRACTOR-AVIATION
52 SWEENEfBtOG.IUNSA5ClTV.no.
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grinding adds 25% to feed value—makes better
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(FLEMIRfi
Mention the Leader When Writing Advertisers
NORTH DAKOTA
Organized labor of Fargo and
League farmers have united to elect
a complete county and legislative tick
et in Cass county, the largest county
in the state.
A Fargo unit of the Working Peo
ple's Nonpartisan Political alliance
has been organized at-an enthusiastic
meeting.
SOUTH DAKOTA
News Notes From Everywhere
OCTOR E. F. LADD,
president of North Da
kota Agricultural col
lege, estimates that the
value of dockage in the
1919 wheat and rye crops
of North Dakota was $4,619,918, while
the cost of screening was $1,750,000,
making the net saving of nearly $3,
000,000 possible to the farmer under
the North Dakota law compelling pay
ment for valuable dockage. These and
other statistics of interest to farmers
are cited in the February bulletin of
the Bank of North Dakota, which may
be had upon application to the bank at
Bismarck, N. D.
An expose has just been made by
the Watertown News of the official
conduct of Commissioner of Public
School Lands N. E. Knight, who is
now a candidate for a third term. Ac
cording to the News Mr. Knight has
permitted favorites of the state po
litical machine to hold school lands
without the payment of the principal,
interest and taxes as required by law.
One of the most flagrant cases is Jhat
of Stitz X. Way, head of the machine
in Codington couiity, who has not paid
any taxes or interest for eight years.
Jerry Bacon of Grand Forks, N. D.,
brother-in-law of Way, has been en
abled to acquire school land holdings
in South Dakota on similar terms.
The debates recently staged in va
rious parts of the state between R. O.
Richards and W. H. McMasters, rival
candidates .for the Republican nom
ination for governor, haye demonstrat
ed that neither candidate offers any
thing constructive for the relief of the
producers of the state. The debates
are proving the inefficiency and the
insincerity of the old parties and con
vincing the voters that the League
offers the only program for the peo
ple.
Because of a recent ruling of the
attorney general of the state the Non
partisan league will be required to
enter the primaries this month for the
election of a state chairman, national
committeeman and delegates to the
national convention, although there
are no opposition candidates for any
of the places on the ticket.
W. J. Mozley, deputy commissioner
for the immigration department of
North Dakota, who recently opened
permanent headquarters in South Da
kota, is touring the state lecturing and
showing moving pictures advertising
the resources and advantages of North
Dakota as a place to live.
MINNESOTA
In order to win a $2,605 lawsuit,
the Quinn Shepherdson company,
grain brokers connected with the Min
neapolis Chamber of Commerce and
Chicago Board of Trade, admitted in
court recently that future trading is
gambling. The plaintiff testified that
he had tiought and sold rye, oats and
corn for future delivery without any
intention of either delivering or re
ceiving, the grain. The Quinn-Shep
herdson company made a similar ad
mission and then asked an instructed
verdict for them. The court so in-
structed the jury. Under the Minne
sota law, future trading is gambling
if both parties to the transaction ad
mit that delivery was never contem
plated. Heretofore members of the
chamber of commerce have always in
sisted that they expected to make de
livery. The admission of the Quinn
Shepherdson company proves the con
tention of the Nonpartisan league that
practically all future trading is gam
bling.
Farmers from all over Minnesota
are planning to attend the massmeet
ing in St. Paul March 26 to ratify the
indorsements of candidates made by
the League and labor conventions.
The state conventions of the Nonpar
tisan league and Working People's
Nonpartisan Political league will be
held March 24 and 25.
Members of the University of Min
nesota faculty may join a labor union
affiliated with the American Federa
tion of Labor. About 20 professors and
instructors are urging the step.
Organized labor made a clean sweep
in Rochester city primaries, nominat
ing all of their candidates for city of
fice on the Republican ticket with big
pluralities.
PAGE EIGHT
NEBRASKA
The state convention of the Non
partisan league has indorsed Elmer E.
Youngs, farmer and stockman of Lex
ington, for governor George B. Wylie
of Fairbury, a railroad man, for lieu
tenant governor, and George C. Porter
of Morrill, former state representa
tive, for attorney general, all on the
Republican ticket.
More than 2,000 farmers attended
the state massmeeting of the League
held in the city auditorium at Lincoln,
February 27. Among the speakers
were Carl D. Thompson, secretary of
the National Public Ownership league,
and former Congressman James
Manahan of St. Paul, Minn.
The League organizers held an all
day meeting in Lincoln following the
League massmeeting and laid* plans
for putting the state "over the top"
by the November election.
Many thousands of dollars have
been subscribed to the proposed state
daily newspaper in Nebraska. Union
labor, as well as the farmers, is taking
an interest in the project.
The constitutional convention, by a
vote of 47 to 43, refused to permit the
people to vote on the question of in
cluding the principle of the recall in
their new constitution.
Several posts of the World War
Veterans have been organized in
Nebraska during the last 10 days.
The organization is growing fast.
IDAHO
Farmers of Twin Falls and Mini
doka counties have decided that the
Nonpartisan league will "go over the
top" in the coming political campaign
if they can do anything to help. And
as a means of showing their sincer
ity, the two counties, at big meetings
recently held in Filer and Rupert, sub
scribed $35,000 for the campaign.
Organized labor in Idaho is busy
fighting a so-called "American" plan
of employers, which they charge is a
camouflaged attempt of employers to
break up labor organizations. The
plan has been tried out in several
Idaho cities and has brought the work
ers to a keen realization that they
must unite more solidly than ever be
fore.
Ex-Governor Frank R. Gooding,
who has declared his intention of run
ning for the senate again this year,
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Km
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By every test the Dearborn is best. It
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