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The nonpartisan leader. [volume] (Fargo, N.D.) 1915-1921, April 12, 1920, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89074443/1920-04-12/ed-1/seq-8/

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ADVERTISEMENTS
YOUR Opportunity
Is Right
Here
MOTOR MECHANICS PAYS BIG
The world is rapidly turning to Motor Power. Farm
log sa done by power equipment. We a hip by trucks,
travel by auto. AU business depend* upon it. What'
ever you do you have got to know motor mechanical
You eao't hold the big jobs without this knowledge.]
Enormous demand for trained mechanics on the farms*
And in cities. Big salaries paid* Take advantage or
thia tremendous opportunity. Learn this big paying
business now.
LEARN IN 7 WEEKS
My practical "horse sense*' oourse teaches you this
big, growing, money»making business step by step,
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learn by doing. Master mechanics always at your
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Seven, short busy weeks make you a master mechanic.
Prepares you to step into a big-paying position or
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BBEB My big book,—actual pictures of equip
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F. D.HENNESSY, President
mi 705 Nebraska Strait
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readers
plements.
Mention the Leader When Writing Advertisers
County conventions were an over
whelming success throughout the
state. In all counties in which there
were labor unions, organized labor
was given representation. More than
three-fourths of the counties decided
to put up county tickets. Twenty
counties have adopted the county
manager plan.
Fred Argast, who has been holding
meetings in three southern counties in
which the League met with losses at
the referendum election due to misrep
resentations of the opposition, reports
that the farmers are fully aware of
the deceptions practiced upon them
and are stronger for the League than
ever before.
Spurgeon Odell has been holding a
series of big meetings throughout the
northern part of the state. Senators
McCarten and Cahill also are holding
big series of meetings and report en
thusiasm everywhere.
Former service men of Cass county
are putting up a local ticket to oppose
old gang political candidates.
Doctor John H. Worst, immigration
commissioner, reports many new
farmers coming to the state.
NEBRASKA
"Die constitutional convention has
adjourned without adopting any meas
ure to remedy the growth of land
tenantry, without including the recall
of public officials in the list of meas
ures to be submitted to the people and
without changing the provision that
limits the amount of state indebted
ness to $100,000. The new constitu
tion will be voted upon at a special
election September 21.
Nonpartisan league candidates for
congress in the third, fifth and sixth
districts are making vigorous cam
paigns for nomination on the Republi
can ticket. Fred L. Crowley of Battle
Creek in the third district, Edwin W.
Reed of Haigler in the fifth district
and J. D. Ream of Broken Bow in the
sixth district are the candidates. They
are being supported by the railroad
men and union labor.
Reports from over the state indicate
that the mass convention of organized
farmers and organized labor and other
progressives on May 4, called to in
dorse or nominate candidates for state
offices, will be the most enthusiastic
gathering held in Nebraska in many
years.
George C. Porter, attorney of Mor
rill, candidate for the Republican
nomination for attorney general and
who was indorsed by the League, is
making an active campaign. Porter
will poll a large labor vote in Omaha
and other labor centers.
In a speech to a massmeeting of
women that filled the Lincoln city au
ditorium, W. J. Bryan indorsed the
Nonpartisan league program of gov
ernment ownership whenever neces
sary to curb monopoly.
The speech of an imported orator to
the boys and girls of the South Omaha
}ugh school, in which he denounced the
initiative and referendum and ridicul­
News Notes From Everywhere
NORTH DAKOTA
ILLIAM LANGER, turn
coat attorney general,
and R. A. Nestos of
Minot are both announc
ed candidates of the
anti-League forces for
governor, with a possibility that John
Steen, former state treasurer, also
will file. While the anti-Leaguers are
thus fighting among themselves the
League forces are preparing for a
rousing state convention, which will be
held soon, to nominate another win
ning ticket to duplicate the successes
of 1918.
PAGE EIGHT
ed the Declaration of Independence,
has aroused a storm of criticism in
Omaha. The Omaha post of the Amer
ican Legion has openly disavowed any
connection with the Northwest War
riors, who brought the speaker to Ne
braska.
KANSAS
Labor has made the initial move
toward political action through a
farmer-labor convention, held in Em
poria on Monday and Tuesday, March
22 and 23, at the call of the president
of the State Federation of Labor.
George J. Klein of Barton county,
field representative of the Nonparti
san league, was requested to address
the conference on three different occa
sions and was heartily received. An
incident of the convention was the
public announcement on the part of
a delegate from Ellis county that he
had been a party to the attempted
mobbing of a League organizer in
that county last year, but that he had
been convinced that he was wrong in
opposing the farmers' movement and
had been misled by big business influ
ence. The convention passed resolu
tions pledging itself to nonpartisan
political action.
Kansans opposed to state ownership
are frequently forgetful of the fact
that the state now operates a state
owned industry that has proved some
thing of a benefit to the farmers. It
is the state-owned twine plant, which
James A. Kimball, state business
agent, says will market its product
this year at 50 cents per 100 pounds
less than the trust prices, and in addi
tion will save the difference in freight
between Chicago and Lansing, about
40 cents per 100 pounds. The
wheat harvest generally requires
about 30,000,000 pounds of twine and
the state plant will furnish about 2,
000,000 pounds of this amount, which
will largely be handled through the
farmers' co-operative organizations.
The farmer-labor political conven
tion just held in this state demonstrat
ed the fact that the labor boys realize
how the farmers are being robbed in
unfair grain grading. They inserted a
"plank" in their platform calling for
"Revision of grain grading laws to
permit producers to realize the full
milling value of grain, and requiring
payment for dockage." If the League
farmers and the laboring men can get
togethei and cause the enactment of
such a law it will be worth the whole
effort, to say nothing of the other ad
vantages which will come to them by
political co-operation.
MINNESOTA
There are now seven avowed Re
publican candidates for governor of
Minnesota, five of whom have already
filed. The list is as follows: Doctor
Henrik Shipstead (farmer-labor),
Thomas Frankson, J. A. Schmahl, M.
J. Dowling, Thomas Keefe, F. E. Ells
worth and Frank Nelson. Ellsworth
withdrew a few weeks ago after con
ducting a flirtation with the Nonparti
san league farmers and organized
labor, but has changed his mind again
and decided to enter the campaign in
opposition to the farmer-labor forces.
Schmahl and Dowling will submit
their candidacy to an "elimination"
convention to be held early in May.
W. I. Nolan, speaker of the house in
the last legislature, and J. A. O. Preus,
state auditor, also will be considered
in the "elimination" convention plan
ned in defiance of the direct primary
law. Nelson has not announced his
attitude toward the elimination plan.
After turning down Senator Iver J.
Lee (Leaguer) of Glenwood, the St.
ADVERTISEMENTS
SELLS GUARANTEED
FORD TIRES FOR $1
Mr. Herb Ford, tire distributor, 1746
Grand avenue, Kansas City, Mo., is
causing a sensation in tire circles by
selling Ford tires, guaranteed in writ
ing for 6,000 miles, at $1 each. He
also sells first grade tourist tubes at
the same price.
Mr. Ford buys tires by the carload
—sometimes taking a factory's entire
supply. Buying in such quantities,
Mr. Ford gets price reductions far
below the usual wholesale figures.'
This advantage he shares with his
customers. He handles only new tires
(no "seconds"), free from defects, on
a written 6,000-mile guarantee.
PLAIN TREAD
Guaranteed 6,000 Miles.
30x3 $18.45 two for $19.45
30x8% 23.80 two for 24.80
82x3% 81.50 two for 32.60
31x4 38.50 two for 39.50
NON-SKID TREAD
Guaranteed 6,000 Miles.
30x3 $20.80 two for $21.80
30x3Vp 27.70 two for 28.70
S2x8Mj 33.90 two for 84.90
31x4 41.00 two for 42.00
HEAVY TOURIST TUBES
30x8 $3.85 two for $4.85
30x3% 4.50 two for 5.60
82x8%*. 4.90 two for 5.90
81x4 5.80 two for 6.80
SEND NO MONEY
State plainly size of tires and tubes
wanted and how many you want. They
will be shipped C. O. D. the same day
the order is received, subject to your
approval. You are the judgfe of the
wonderful value of these tires. You
are under no obligation—if they are
not better than represented and a big
ger bargain than you can get any
where else, send them back and they
cost
y°«
a
«ent A big Kansas City
bank sajra that Mr. Ford is absolutely reliable.
As this offer cannot last very long you
should send in your order today to Mr. Herb
Ford, Pres., Tire Service Company, 1746 Grand
£lny wanted. Mo
State sizes and
hors«
""wolk
how
ARMY GOODS
Purchased From the
United States Government
Aluminum mess kits, each ... S 78
a! J. J"111?, aluminum canteens, each 73
Sjfel hospital cots, each *"8
New hip rubber boots, per pair KM
1912 model officers' saddles, each $15 and up
U. S. McClellan saddles, each IS 00
Birbid^X.1"Mac^'V"
each
^SjJ
Humane metal horse collars, each'!!! 400
Jrer dozen ,7'S
and' ooU'®L.
hor8°
collars, 'sizes" *18.""
19
Knapsacks, each mm
Army blankets, each i'Sj
blankets,'' canvas.
wool lined, per pair
h^r.0 lTd^g?ternment
W»1
lined, canvas
horse blankets, per pair
ilk in-AK8' 'ead harness, per' set'!!37la0
harness, oak tan leather,
lft-inch lines, per set 70
^et breeching harness. 1-inch lines/per
'e»'ern'ment'''breeching'' himeSB.
SlWtin'SCBiinhan,ess'
85,00
11/L68!. long, per set .. 82.50
trace
breeching harness!
lH-inch lines, per set ..7777?... flijtn
JH-hich
strap
worK, 1 lines, per set .. flaitA
mS10™'ft-inch
manufacture^
by Starch Bros'.'.
"ewVT &"*<?•''roake.^ea'di*?.
'jS- BemUtlng gac^s,
each
j-SS
Mail orders promptly ailed. Send draft or moniv
order along, include postage if to paril Mst
S2e"SSSoweCM8aiy
SPecUy
slM3-
d° not
Barrett & Zimmerman
MIDWAY HORSE MARKET, ST. PAUL, MINN.
MB. FABMEB:
save money by us
ing your old drill.
My patent disc at
tachment keeps
double disc from
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Also cleaner. Price
per set of 20, $13.
one or two-draw
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ed for 75a Van
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sample at 85c.
John A. 8wanton
Bantry. N. D.
old chicks. Safe
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PouItryFarm,Box ggj Lanoarter.Mow
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