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The nonpartisan leader. [volume] (Fargo, N.D.) 1915-1921, July 19, 1920, Image 9

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89074443/1920-07-19/ed-1/seq-9/

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similarity to those brought .up by ,Mr.
Grogs of Wisconsin in ,the Republican
national convention/
The Republican ctittvefition liissed'"
Gross and voted his planks dotal.
The Democratic convention cheered
Bryan—and voted his planks down....
What is the difference? ''$£• -|§if
With the nomination for president
of James M, Cox, governor of Ohio,
by the Democrats, American voters
this fall will be called upon to choose
between tWo candidates of remarkable
similarity. Both Cox and the Repub
lican nominee, Senator Warren G.
Harding, live in Ohio, Cox at'Dayton"
and Harding at Marion. Both are
newspaper publishers both are fa
vored by that clique, of international
financiers popularly' referred to as
'fWall street." ....
The story of Senator Harding and
his nomination by the Republican con
vention at Chicago was told in a pre
vious issue of the Leader.. His sup
port of the Wall street^ reactionary
program in the last sessions of con
gress needs no farther introduction or
comment.
Of Governor Cox, William Jennings
Bryan, writing from San Francisco as
the balloting was in progress, said:
"It would be difficult to bring the Wail
street crowd up' to a line so distinctly
drawn. The most of them are with
Governor Cox, who has wisely en
trusted this part of his campaign to
former Governor Harmon, who was
the Wall street candidate at Balti
more eight years ago, Mr. McAdoo
and Mr. Palmer have some supporters
amongst .this element but a man who
is really under the control of the finan
ciers is moved from candidate to. can
didate as a pawn on a checkerboard
is moved from square to square, ac-_
cording to the platrof the one who is
playing the game."
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CONFUSION AIDS IN
BOSSING CONVENTION
j:.
The same situation: existed at San
.Francisco as at Chicago. A multi
plicity of candidates was trotted opt
to confuse the more "simple" dele
gates, while entire delegations were
shifted from one candidate to another
by bosses who sat in "star chambers"
in the ante-roomp and convention ho
tels. When the delegates1 had ex
hausted themselves and the candidates
undesired were worn down, decisive
switches in voting delegations were
effected and the choice of the fraan
,-^ciers tfas nominated.
Governor Cox is accustomed to
rm¥
shouting for tariff protection. The
farmer who supports the high tariff
idea is certainly playing the other
man's game for him and that other
man is none other than our old friend,
Does "Protection" Protect Farmer?
Datus G. Smith Questions Benefits of Policy From, Stand
point of Agriculture
DITOR Nonpartisan Lead
er: When it comes to
foolishness the foolish
virgins had nothing on
the occasional American
farmer who is today
the "poor" American .manufacturer,
tsiho used to plead that he was an in- ,a .is simply holding the bag.
fant industry and then when he wasV.i.v, In the maifl the farmer's products
grown so big that it was indecent to can not possibly be protected because
any longer call himself an infant, told
,us it was a good thing for us.anyway,
gtyto keep oxi feeding him protection pap.
-y'KAnd for 40 years we have paid the
^gpiper while the wealth of the
.ucked into the towiis by the aid off^inanufactarer and one for the farmer
'•lyfhe tariff. Protection, tariff protection, means
At the first meeting of the American simply, protection on the price—let us
obeying Orders and fulfilling the am-'"
bitions and programs of the financial
and speculative elements. He was
born 54 years ago at Jacksonburg,
Ohio, and, having spent his boyhood
oil a farm, his political preps agents
will have colorful material for cam
paign propaganda
BOUGHT BIG PAPER
ON REPORTER'S WAGE
-He later became a newspaper re
porter, in the days when $12 a week
were considered as the makings of a
week's- payroll, and while thus con
nected with the Cincinnati Enquirer,
his biography tells us, he purchased
the Dayton Daily News in 1898, and
also the Springfield Press-Republic in
1903, and organized the News league,
of Ohio at the same time. With a
powerful newspaper in Dayton, an
other at Springfield, and with scores
of smaller town papers toadying to
the big Cox press, coupled with the
assistance of the News league, Mr.
Cox launched into politics for himself.
In 1909' he was elected and sent to
congress, serving until 1913, when he
was elected governor of Ohio. "After
serving one term he was retired to
.private life, but in. 1917 he staged a
comeback and again occupied the gov
ernor's chair at Columbus.
As a newspaper editor and publish
er, Governor Cox has made no inno
vations. His papers are not of the so
called "reform" kind. They are re
garded, rather, by his profession as
of the New York Times-Chicago Trib
une-St. Paul Dispatch Minneapolis
Tribune stamp. Different, though, it
is with Senator. Harding's paper. It
is located in too small a city to come
in the Cox press classification. Sena
tor Harding's paper in Marion has the
reputation" of supporting almost any
thing the big Republican machine
newspapers advocated, the same as
has its owner, the senatpr himself..
Farm Bureau federation one of the*, »ot forget it.
high officials, just elected, gave somelj&tj DATUS G. SMITHfj^
intimation of an intention to root for Blanchard, N. D&^s
Both cater to the satfie element for
financial support, in private life as
well as during the campaigns. The
East already scents a. flow- of cam
paign. funds. That a "huge" barrel
will be tapped in Wall street is little
doubted, and from, that same "barrel"
the coin will flow tp Ohio, to Dayton
and to Marion, figuratively, but, ac
tually, the same crowd will spend
equally huge sums,, on both Harding
and Cox in a farcical campaign. Both
are satisfactory to the international
financial ring, so t}ie voters may have
the choice 'of selecting between two
evils, one carrying a label "RepubJ^-.
can" and the other "Democrat." & *2
"protection" and now I see'a leading
western farm journal in its business
section actually proposing that steps
be taken to limit general imports be
cause some things are likely to be im
ported that the fanpaer has to sell.
It is true tjiat protection is made
»real on some few things, and only a
few, that the farmer grows, and we
shtald have what little help we can get
in that way, but in the great run of the
protection business the farmerVpart
rival products are not imported, while
about everything he has. to buy is in
creased in price by the "protection" it
carries.
It is a 16-torl plan—sixteen for the
Titself
V'.v
Herschel Knotters are
made to fit McCor
mick, Deering or John
Deere binders, for'
small grain or corn.
Send today tor
PAGE NINE
ADVERTISEMENTS
Ties Airy Kind of- Twine Perfectly
HE Herschel Binder Knotter automatically adjusts
to any size or diameter of twine. With under
size, oversize or even twine, it makes
a
double ©r triple strands. It discharges a knot of two or three
strands as easily and readily as knots of a single strand.
Whfether flax or hemp, hard or soft "twine, the Herschel Knotter
ties the knots securely. It never missies. It will'tie cheaptwine
that can not be used in the ordinary knotter.
Every Knot Perfect
The Leader does not knowingly accept advertising from
-dishonest people. Our advertisers are worthy of support.
perfect knot, even with
•M
In operation the Herschel Knotter is like'1
any other knotter, except that it has the
yielding jaw to insure a perfect tie. This yield
ing jaw handles all .sizes of twine without a
single adjustment.
Order from your dealer
—or write us direct.
Herschel-Roth Mfg. Co.
Minneapolis, Minn.
lis iheVieldin^
dawThal Does 11"
yu*
Guaranteed to Save 95% of* All Down Grain
The Anderson Grain Saving Device is a necessity that no
farmer can afford to do without. It will absolutely pick up
95% oi
all fallen grain,, and pay for itself in harvesting 40
acres by saving 3U grain- knocked down by back cutting
and light grain otherwise lost. No harvesting machine is
complete without a set. of Anderson Guards and should not
enter the harvest field without a set. Ten guards as shown
in the above cut area complete set and they are so made
that they can easily be attached to the platform of any
binder.
Price $25.00 per set ..
/ree
folder. Ask your dealer for the Anderaon Grain
§aein_g, Device, if he doe* not handle it order direct from the
LACLEDE IRONWORKS
1535-1547 North Ninth St. St. Louis, Mo*
Mention the Leader When Wilting Advertisers
It-
f.

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