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The Lemmon herald. (Lemmon, Perkins County, S.D.) 1912-1917, February 03, 1915, Image 9

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89074986/1915-02-03/ed-1/seq-9/

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for Five Years
I was
Troubled
with a
Chronic
Disease.
Peruna
Cured me
Sound
and Well.
Mrs Maggie Durbin, 203 Victory
Pt' Little Bock. Ark., writes: "I was
..oubled f'r five years with a chronic
i'i tease. I 'ried everything: I heard
,f but nothing did me any good.
Some doctors said my trouble *a»,
ca'arrh of the bowels, and some said
consumption of the bowels. Onef
doctor said he could cure me I took
his medicine two months, but It did
me ro good. A friend of mine ad
vised me to try Peruna and I did so.
After 1 had taken two bottles I found
i! was helping me. so 1 continued Its
use. and it has cured me sound and
well. 1 can recommend Pertint to
anv one. and If any one wants to
know what Peruna did for me If they
will write to me 1 will answer
promptly."
Four Thousand Miles.
A thousand miles up the mighty Pt
Lawrence, thousand miles along the
trreat
lakes, a thousand miles across
the open piiarie, a thousand miles over
it »ea of mountains four thousand
miles
where nation meets nation and
sovereignty meets sovereignty, but
never a fortress, never a battleship,
ttver
a
gun.
the
never a sentinel on
guard! Four thousand miles of civ
IMied and Christianized international
ism—that is North America's greatest
ucbievement.—James A. Macdonald in
American Review of Reviews.
IUPTFM
A CHILD'S BOWELS
It is cruel to force nauseating,
harsh physic into
a
sick child.
Look back at your childhood days.
Tii
member the "dose" mother insisted
on castor oil, calomel, cathartics.
Mow you hated them, how you fought
•gainst taking them.
With our children it's different.
Mothers who cling to the old form ot
physic simply don't realize what they
4# The children's revolt Is well-found
•i. Their tender little "insides" are
injured by them.
if your child's stomach, liver and
bowels need cleansing, give only deli
t-.ous "California Syrup of Figs." Its
action is positive, but gentle. Millions
cf mothers keep this harmless "fruit
laxative'' handy they know children
love to take it that it never fails to
clean the liter and bowels and sweet
en the stomach, and that a teaspoonful
given today saves a sick child tomor
row
Afk at the store for a 50-cent bottle
f'f
"California Syrup of Kips,'" which
i'as full directions for babies, children
all ages and for grown ups plainly
each bottle. Adv.
•to Unpleasant Suggestion.
"My friend, the real estate agent,
thought he had landed a big political
afent as a tenant for a desirable prop
but, Mtertuoatcl). he scared
tim off."
"How?"
"By inadvertently mentioning It had
exposures all around."
HOW TO HEAL THAT RAW.
ITCHING, SCALY SKIN
Tf you are suffering with eczema,
ringworm, rash or similar tormenting
(•km disease, try resinol ointment and
resinol soap. You will be surprised
hfw quickly the itching stops and the
becomes clear and healthy again.
Prescribed by doctors for 20 years.
AH druggists sell resinol oinment
'••Oc and 11.00). and resinol «wp
t.i,c).—Adv.
Old-Fashloned.
^ou said she is old-fashioned?"
Oh. hopelessly so. She is Still
:r,e a
collection of picture post-
A Stitch inTime
'"'i arid gi-rin diseases are
to overwork the kidney® and
then
im'-i Jii convilficfncf, in
1-oi.J k
,ny f,me when
»u«plc!on
niir" „„{,y »""•. achlriR bark. rhMi
OTrt^r Ja,n* n^afJarheg, dizziness or dls
fill. i.
,h*
of
Kl.ln.-y
n
that may avoid
Kifinnv
""ifdlclne t* to wlilelv u«*J »n
•erul'4^'
or
BeM. riily luc-
A South Dakota Case
D. B. Wood
worth. Vermilion.
K- D.. aays: "Ex
r°«ura and chilli
vw-akened
tvrr, Plm,
my
kid-
r:« ya and a* years
potiifd. i he troubk
,t wort*. 1 had a
dull fcche In
my
bsck. almoit con
stantly and I had
to
got up
at
night
kidney
Noth-
...» did mo a**v
good until I us?J
K i n e y
creli
f£/ Tilia and they
cured me com
pWt«!v My health
.","n *ver ilnco and my kidneys
occii
in
guoU shape."
Cr!D0,0.,
An
St.re
rfle e Bax
POAN'S V.IlV
CO.. BUFFALO. N. Y.
GIVE SET BACK
TO CROP ROTATION
HIGH WHEAT PRICK* PUZZLE
MOUTH DAKOTA D1VEft%iPI
CATION AGENT.
TO INCREASE GRAIN ACREAGE
Western Section Will Plant
Nor* Cereals—Progress in Cat*
tit and Hcg Raiting Also
Indicated.
Whether the high pric'--
for wheat will set North Dakota hack
froru (ho sain made by the diversifica
tion agents, is a question which iuz
fcle^ the bcqk friers of the western
Bcction of thf- state.
In the last few years great gains
h«ve been made in persuading fac
ers to give up the one crop, all wheat,
method of farming. Dairying has made
ood headway and hog raisin? has iti
rreaeed 1.000 per rent In the 11 coun
tie(s of the Missouri slope, notation of
crops has been practiced by many
with the result that the land has not
been robbed of its fertility.
Now, according to leading bankers
8hl real estate men, hardly a farmer
of ihe entire district but who is plan
ning on increasing his wheat acreage.
The phenomenal rise in durum prices
has caused a furor.
J. S. Pirdsall of the new Leipsig
State hank declares that the durum
acreage in that vicinity will be in
creased by 40 per tent next year. L.
Clapp of Shields asserts that the du
rum acreage will be increased 50 per
cent in bis section. All through the
western Dakota counties the same per
centage holds.
Records in county offices show that
more mortgages have been canceled in
the last three month than ever be
fore. The farmers are investing their
money in new machinery, in lighting
plants for the farms, in silos ana the
installation of co-operative telephone
lines. They are also buving cattle and
hogs. Creameries are to be established
soon at Mandan and other points In
which farmers will be the chief stock
holders.
Bankers make what they assert are
conservative estimates, saying that de
posits in western North Dakota banks
have Jumped 30 per «rut since Dec.
1. 1914.
N. D. SCRIBES NAME OFFICERS
Press Association Ends Convention
and Selects Grand Forks as Win
ter Meeting Place.
Fargo.—Grand Forks was named as
the winter meeting place for the North
Dakota Press association. The sum
mer meeting w ill be held at Mandan.
At the closing nesston the following
oflicers were elected:
President—E. I-. Richter, Larimore.
First Vice President —R. J. Hughes,
Wahpeton.
Second Vice President—J. Charm
ley. Mott.
Third Vice President—lo. Mon
teith. Finley.
Secretary—W. 11. Francis, Velva.
Treasurer—J. R. Howard. McHrnry.
Executive Committee—J. H. Me
Garry, Alexander H. P. Knappen,
Bismarck: M. I. Forkmer, Cavs.lier.
The resolutions which were adopted
thank the Fargo people for their en
tertainment, recommend the continu
ance of the monthly bulletin, which
is published by the secretary, and
direct the appointment of a commit
tee to publish a digest of all the print
ing laws of the state for distribution
to the press association members.
Two papers were read at the ses
sion. They are: "MisceHany," by D.
L. Campbell of Northwood, and "The
l.ocal Advertiser, How to Interest and
Hold Him." by Roy V. Fyles of Milnor.
EXPERT TO ADVISE FARMERS
Professor Hart of Wisconsin Will Talk
to Convention on: "Barnyard
Manures and Uses."
Grand Forks.—Professor E. B. Hart
Of the University of Wisconsin will
appear on the program of the North
Dakota corn and Clover convention
and Mid-winter Fair, which will be
held in Grand Forks, February 1st to
Cth.
I'rofessor Hart is one of the leading
chemists or this country and is re
o^nized as an international authori
ty on plant foods, lie will take part
In the class work Tuesday the 2nd,
itnd in the evening will talk to the con
vention on "Baryard Manures and
their Economic Uses." He has made
tin extensive study of the soils through
out the northwest and his advice to
the farmers of North Dakota on this
occasion will be the result of the con
ditions in North Dakota and the Red
iiiver Valley.
Dickinson to Have Federal Building.
Dickinson.—Dickinson holds an ap
propriation of SlOd.uno for a federal
olding, investigation by Dickinson
business men. made at Washington,
Indicate such a fact. Recently there
'..as a considerable scare here at the
suppose failure of congress to pro
vide for the Dickinson building. Ad
vises now, however, indicate that the
federal building was provided for und
ijr a blanket appropriation measure,
nnd construction work probably will
begin next year.^ A site for the build
in! baa teen maintained.
FARGO'S NEW POSTMASTER
Ucrc,e
Wilkinson, owner and editor
of the Fargo Democrat, who hrs ji'St
been appointed by President Wilslfi to
be postmaster at Fargo to succeed
H. C. Plumley,
FILES BUDGET WITH AUDITOR
University of North Dakota Showt
CVIMttated Need of Quarter
Million Dollars.
Bismarck.—The University of North
Dakota budget, showing an estimated
need of S2.'M.4 "9. *r. for the uni.ersity
and school of mines proper, irrespec
tive of the several departments operat
ed under the direction of the institu
tional board of regepts, hfis been filed
with State Auditor Carl .lorgenson. In
his letter to Auditor .Jorgenson trans
mitting the estimated needs of the in
stitution. Secretary Wilkerson says:
"In compliance with your request
I am separating the mining station
and biological station from the uni
versify budget, and have treated in
the same way the state geological sur
vey and the state public health labor
atory, both of which are imposed on
us. In a way, and are not institutional
expenses."
I'nder the general budget for the
university and school of mines, cover
ing the estimate of money needed
during the coming biennial period,
provision is made for additions to two
of the present buildings, the science
hall ami engineering building. The
sum of $2."),000 for engineering and
135,000 for science hall is asked.
Under the head of maintenance
$100,0(10 is asked, divided as follows:
General maintenance Ifi.1.000
Library maintenance ......... fi.oon
Grounds 2.500
Repairs *.,000
Summer sessloa 4,000
Extension work l.'i.OOff
Audit of accounts. 2."00
Another item is $36,000, a deficit
created in 1914 and 191." by the re
duction of the anticipated income.
Under the head of equipment, $2,
500 for the medical school and |5,()06
for the engineering work is ashed.
CHILD CAUSES FIRE SCARE
Baby With Matches Starts ConiUgsa
tion Which Threatens St. Bern
ard Academy Building.
Grand Forks.—A fire was dis»o\ red
at the St. Bernard academy and quick
resiionse on the part of the fire de
partment probably saved the building
from destruction. Damage to the
building amounted to about $1"0.
Mrs. I„. Turcotte, who is visiting at
the academy for a few weeks, left her
3-year-old child in the room while
she went to nearby neighbors. Re
turning a short time later she noticed
smoke issuing from under the door.
Entering the room she found the win
dow case curtains, dresser, etc., burn
ing fiercely.
An alarm was at once turned in
and the department responded, extin
guishing the biaze before much dam
age had been done to the remainder
of the building.
How the fire started Is not definite
ly known but it is presumed that the
baby, following its mother's departure,
found a match and striking it against
the wall ignited the curtain wni'h in
turn caused the dresser scarf and the
dresser itself to catch fire.
Had it not been for the opportune
return of the mother the child won Id
probably have been cremated as the
sisters who occupy the building were
absent with the exception of one who
was at work in the kitchen. She was
unaware of the fire until Mrs. Tur
cotte returned and discovered the
blazing room.
Grafton.—Having a hallucination
that he was being pursued and was to
be thrown into jail or suffer ?ome
bodily harm, was iiie cause of the sui
cide of Andrew Elahaug. according to
an investigation of his death. He was
found with a bullet hole through his
head and a revolver by hiB side.
Farmers to Receive Trees Free.
Bottineau.—A total of 33.".0f0 trees
will be distributed this year by the
North Dakota school of forestry, the
free distribution being made under
legislative enactment. The farmers of
the state have taken very heartily to
the free distribution plan, and they
they have requests on file lor IM',597
trees, in addition to which there are
136,000 willow cuttings to be distribut
ed. Of the latter. 100.000 have already
been cut, leaving about ',6.000 to be
cut this spring. Orders for trues are
coming la. .. .—
TALK ON WESTERN
Facts Don't Li«—Western Can
ada Is Full of Facts—Haft
Are Three of Them.
1. C. T. Moore, Underbill. Man.
Came from Bruce County. Ontario.
1SS2, with a capital of |2.00. Home
steaded quarter section Now owns
C.MtO acres for which he paid average
of $20 00—worth today $40 00 per acre
2 James Steel. Rattleford. Sas
katchewan. Came from Perthshire.
Scotland, 1904 His faro advanced to
bring himself and family to Canada,
Took up homestead, which he sold
later $25.00 per acre, buying 1.000
acres at $16.00 per acre. Has been
very successful in mixed farming
Values land now at $40.oo per acre,
and is worth $60.00. If I had re
mained In the Old Country my gray
hair# wnnlfl hnvj been a pe^sport to
the feoor houoe," he taya.
3 J. mith, Clover Bar. Alberta.
Came from North Michigan, 1893.
without capital Now farm'tig f00
acres, valued at $200 per acre. Pur
chased originally at $15 00 per acre.
Engaged in mixed farming. Cows
average him $150 00 a year.
All this talk about the exploitation
of labor by capital, class distinction,
living wage, high cost of living, and
so forth, doesn't hold the slightest
interest for the Canadian farmer
Why? Because ho has proved that
you can't begin too ioor to become
rich in Canada: that free homesteads
preclude the possibility of being
robbed of freedom and Independence
that the high cost of living cant hurt
the man who grows most of his own
necessities that his labor brings re
ward in exact and Just proportion to
time and intelligence invested
#lf those who whine at urban condi
tions would give a little time to in
vestigating those suburban, they
would likely spy a clear way out of
their difficulties. For the first step,
drop a card to any Canadian Govern
ment Agent.-Advertisement.
Claim Prophecy Fulfilled.
A conference of llible students held
recently at Keswick. N. revived an
ancient prophecy concerning Egypt,
the literal fulfillment of which, they
asserted, has been borne out in his
tory. The prophecy Is fotmd in Eze
klel 29-13-15 and 30:13. Part of
it reads as follows: "It shall he
the basest of kingdoms, neither shall
it exalt Itself any more above the
nations, for 1 shall diminish them thit
they shall no more rule over the na
tions and there shall be no
more a •pHnre of the land of Egypt:
«nd I will put a fear in the land of
Egypt." Since this prophecy was
written, said one of the speakers,
Egypt has been ruled by the Babylo
nians, the Romans and the Turks,
and now it has passed under the ab
solute sway of England Yet Egypt
once was the greatest aad rlcln-.-t
the world's nations.
GRANDMA USED SAGE TEA
TO DARKEN HER GRAY HAIR
Sh« Made Up a Mixture of Sage Tea
and Sulphur to Bring Back Color,
Close, Thickness.
Almoct everyone knows that Sage
Tea and Sulphur, properly'c ompound
ed, brings back the natural color and
lustre to the hair when faded, streaked
or gray: also ends dandruff, itching
scalp and stops falling hair. Years
ago the only way to get this miiture
was to make it at home, which is
mussy and troublesome Nowadays,
by asking at any store for "Wyeth's
Sage and Sulphur Hair Remedy," you
will get a large bottle of the famous
old recipe for about 00 cents
A! OH- i, I'l l) CM
ANlfflt'taMc Prepjratien Tor A*
similrttii'O iheFvVdaiKlRfOiila
lm£ (tu* SVtnai hs .uul IIowc In of
shr
Promo:! .. Ui^citnui.i. luf ri'iil
nrssandlu'M Contains wither
Opium.Morphtnf tvr Mineral
N
ot
N ah
otic
Kx'f» y'o'H 4 viu/vrats*
1
Sid
AM,//,
-U
Apfrfcrt Kt'mcdy fot fon«ltfv»
lion Sour Slomach.lMitttIkh'«
Worms,( onvtiUions
•s5
TOI
Don't stay gray! Try it! No one
can possibly tell that you darkened
your hair, as it does it so naturally
and evenly. You dampen a sponge or
soft bru:~h with ft and draw this
through your hair, taking one small
strand at a time, by morning the gray
hair disappears, and after another ap
plication or two, your hair becomes
beautifully dark, thick and gloaay^—
Adv.
Iron in India in Epic Age.
That Iron was found in large quan
tities in the epic age in India is evi
denced by the fact that it was then
employed in making massive statues.
In the third or fourth century before
Christ, the Hindus were apparently
adepts In preparing steel. In the lit
erature of the times, one comes across
elaborate descriptions of various sur
gical instruments for most delicate
surgical operations.
Regrets.
"I can't help regretting those tips I
scattered through Kur' pe," said the
man who likes to travel.
"They weren't so much, were they7''
"They may not have represented a
great sum. liut If I had known they
were to be squandered on this war, 1
wouMr't hnv
1pm
35
i)o*£±
~^£.Centv
Exait Copy of VVrifpfi.
CHILDREN IN THE SICKROOM
Writer la of Opinion They Shout#
Kept From Visiting Their Af
flicted Playmates.
Children can do their little play
mates no conceivable good by visiting
or staying near them when they are
sick, and they run serious risk both of
contracting the disease themselves
and of spreading It to others of their
play mates. Is the assertion of a writer
In Jood Housekeeping Magazine in
view of this 1 think we should really
hesitate about leaching this "visiting
the sick and afflicted" form of altru
Ism to children before they are of an
age to be able to make any practical
application of it witiiout involvlne
themselves and the community In se
rious danger out of all proportion to
any possible compensating return. We
would not dream of teaching a child
of seven that he should rush into a
burning building to empt* the con
tents of his toy bucket upon the
flames Infinitely his most useful
service Is to spread the alarm, to
shout at the top of Ills voice to the
nearest grownup that he can And. to
run and tell the policeman, or carry
the word to the nearest tire station or
firebox So it i-hcmld be with ihose
deadliest conflagrations which take
toll of humanity- -fever and pestilence
Why They Ware Attentive
A clergyman preaching in a country
church for the first time was delighted
to find the congregation very attentive
and told the verger so after the serv
ice The verger replied:
"Ixir' bless you, sir. we was all !"k
ing for you to disappear
"Why, what do you mean?" said the
clergyman.
"Well, sir, you see, the pulpit is rot
ten, and hasn't been preached In 'lis
ten year or more."'
own
nnt i.oitT
K
A
win thm. too
ITt Murmf Kr* llrw4f H"l W
Mr»* and l.rm.u.iiK-O Kirid*. No
u n
n o W
k v'»:1 1*
u1
.«• m.t'it
CASTORIA
ri^'t
ness ind Loss
of
S
leep
Tdc Simile SijJojtur* ct
c/L^fZZJS*.
Tllf. t. stalk OMPAXY,
N 1 \V VOHK
r»t
'|M\
A(6 hjjMfth ?lfl
For Infantt and Children.
Mothers Know That
Genuine Castoria
Always
Bears the
Signature
of
I K
kf tree Muime llrumr i... I
I A counterfeit smile Is one that
i starts at the lips instead of at the
Ij/
A real guarantee on roofing!
Buarant
writ!
world
Buy materials that last
Certaiti'teed
prod*
our uaiue
Aaphalt Roofinfft
Ma!*' Surfaced
Felt*
[)e*deninf Fella
Tarr+d f!t,
Buildioc P«p«rt
fH-1'von ma/•ha.J-M
Uotf new
Tttty
beat
ywU» lOf l£a poatagc, OUI f-£ :*«J i~ a "J fr
All tlx
w'dt-i*'* -r
Roofing
the/ l**f
1 -ply guaranteed 5 years
2-ply guaranteed 10 years
1-ply guaranteed 15 years
General Roofing Manufacturing Company
fri'j -ftt' -J /"./
New Tark Oy P.-uUrili
.'tcai|a 1 uiacrt
IC»ata* it? Mieaeapib* Frutac*
In
Use
For Over
Thirty Years
CASTORIA
Gammon Specimen*.
Knicker- Is Jones a tired tonsil" ms
man?
Ilocker- No, he a nred tank of
business man.
UNDER SENSITIVE SKINS
$ulct(ly 8oothed by Cuticuea. Notb*
ing Better. Trial Free.
"Especially when preceded by a liot
bath with Cuticurs Soap. Many com
forting things there fragrant super
creamy emollients mny do for the
skin, scalp, hair and hands and do It
quickly, effectively and economically.
Also for tho toilet, bath and nursery.
Sample each free by mall with Hook.
Address postcard, utlcura, Dept. XY,
Boston. Bold every* here —AdT.
Wat Blanket Genius.
"In what meter shall I write tW*
light verse, my dear?"
"How would ihe gas meter dot"*
resting
...
'••i*. tariff heeult
,relu (r *,i, rt^ .f
.i! l»-*r
-a l«#r» tfy.tn.rf
"pn% Ft'h»"?*i"\
1 (KAfHaf*,!**
S 6% LOANS S
On Fmrmm and Oity Property
Money uvaiUMe after Jar u itv Mt. I o loan
on in.pjovrt! nnd
um i
tni ni («rm nnd Hy
prof*rty, in amount up at 0'
0
foi tetmof
1 lo 5 yc«r». i ilc api'tu «it ion» at or e »itfe
Farmers Securit.et Co.. Healey Bliff., Atlanta, Ga
POTATO
PRICES
Ha cri I'ud'ifs J'oIji»'/#•• hr p+A pm WtRyio*!n way
otl w]ti t« *•!!..riis' uh o'.t«!. flHlri W«* *n
to
tut yt.it Hi AlAUHi It
HUM
John «. tilisr te*4 C« B*i 707. Ls Cr»'i«. Wit.
BEST MARKET for
POUI.TItY VfcAI. LltKAM
I E S K S K A N S
Write us for Price 1-lnt and Tug.
THE R. COBB C0 .14E Jfd »tre«t. St. Paw'.MlMk
W N U. SIOUX FAILS, NO -19'5
Roofings,
like moat people,
prove their worth
by the test ot time
l.aprrfl
InawUtinf Pa para
Wall Board*
PU«t. koo^mcCM
Aftphaft rmeal
Roof oatire
Metal Paint*
Out door Ptiata
Skint I# Slain*
Refined Coal T«T
Tar Coat
104 Pitcb
f'LiUdelf'kta Alia* 1
Saat'ie L«a4««
UK
1*0
JOO 1"AJJ7V
f-.c,
:.vt
V
ifh one f.^rou i p«.kaga
Ptu'ia Firsfc Earif x-fcbac* Eanv Ca«v*b*r
•it bOASir La^f L«ttnc« A M^ztur* af OaJoai JoJe?
•f,«en..-:/». i-Ji, J'r/ vr

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