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Willmar tribune. [volume] (Willmar, Minn.) 1895-1931, March 22, 1899, Image 1

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THE BEAVER.
A. PETERSON & CO.
Mikkelson Block. Willmar.
it*
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1
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I MIKKELSON BLOCK,
THE BEAVER.
A- PETERSON & CO
Mikkelson Block. Willmar.
Special Sale, March 28.
As I am going to leave and time is
too short to properly advertise an
auction sale, I will sell cheap for
cash or approved notes at 5 per cent
interest. One span of horses, 6 cows,
one 14 hoe seeder, one 25 foot harrow,
one new mower, one binder, 2 plows,
1 hay rake, 1 top buggy, 1 double bug
»y, 2 wagons, 1 pair of sleighs, har
ness etc. etc., at Peter Peterson's
place, 4 miles south of Willmar, at a
special sale on Tuesday, March 28tb.
Everything has to be sold on or be
for said date.
0-lp A N E W H. E E S O N
Card of Thanks.
W hereby express our sincere
thanks to all who so kindly assisted
us, and sympathized with us during
our great affliction, the death of our
dear little daughter.
MR. AND S O N A E
Are you thin? Would you like to
tret fat and plump? Tried "laughing,"
"uvouldn't work now take Rocky
Mountain Tea—'twill do the business.
:35 cents. A. E. Mossberg, druggist.
Baled hay for
feed-barn.
sale at the Glarum
ltf
Spectacles
have value only when fitted by
a man understanding the eye
and its defects. Properly fitted
glasses relieve headache, eye
strain, soreness, tired feeling and
styes, and enable you to see per
fectly without tiring. We test
eyes
Free of Charge
and Guarantee Satisfaction*
JEWELER and OPTICIAN.
4%»»»»»»»%%%%%% 'Urn
A I N A O I N S
1. Tell the truth.
2. Small profits.
3. Quick sales.
4. Bring your money and see what you
can get.
5. Treat all alike.
Our furniture store will hereafter be known as the ''The Beaver." We are always busy looking after
tne interests of our customers, knowing that in pleasing: our customers we lay the safest and most sub
stantial foundation for a successful business future. W hope to make "The Beaver" a byword for reli
ability in every household in the city and country. In buying furniture the price is not the only consid
eration. You do not want goods that are made only to sell cheap, but goods which stand the test of wear
and time and which will be a joy and comfort to you in your home. We have the goods, any grade you
want or can afford, in variety. Come in and find what suits you, and we will guarantee the price will
be rig-ht. Do not be deceived by cheap talk. That is some people's chief stock in trade.
If you contemplate buying house furnishings now or in the future, we would be glad to have you call
and inspect our stock. No trouble to show goods. We want your good will whether you decide to buy
from us or not, and if we can be of any assistance to you by word or deed in the solution of the problem
of making the most of your means at hand in meeting your tastes and needs we will be happy indeed. Do
not hesitate to call on us.
THE BEAVER.
A PETERSO
N & CO,
Your Opportunity.
SUITES—Birch, Oak, Ash, Maple. Elm. SINGLE BEDS—Iron, Oak, Ash, Maple, Elm, etc.
MATTRESSES—All grades. SPRINGS—None but the best at lowest prices. CUPBOARDS—Both
hard and soft wood. COUCHES—Prices to suit. BED LOUNGES—A large assortment. CARPETS
A large number of patterns. TABLES—Extension: 6 ft., 8 ft., 10 ft., 12 ft Centre: Mahogany, Golden
Oak, Plain Oak, etc. CHIFFONIERS, Book Cases, Bureaus, Window Shades, Ha Racks, Matting,
Rugs, Easels, Screens, etc.. etc TAPRSTRY—Full line of Curtains, Table Cloths, Couch Covers, etc.
CEAIRS—Roman, Rockers, Dining, Common, Child's, High. UNDERTAKING—We hold a special
certificate from the State Board of Health. The largest stock west of the cities.
Do not fail to look over our stock. No trouble to show goods.
Furniture in Carload Lots.
Great Saving in freight for the benefit of our
customers*
Town Elections.
GENNESSEE.
Chairman of supervisors, Henry
Boese supervisors, R. A. Peterson
and Gunder B. Samstad town clerk,
Andrew Plygare treasurer, D.
Senechal assessor, A. O. Narverud
justice of the peace, T. L. Saugmyhr:
constable, Earnest Wilson.
VILLAGE OF RAYMOND.
President, M. A. Scholz trustees,
A. Rosenquist, W H. Harris and
A. Latterall recorder, E. W Dittes
treasurer, S. E. Fay justice, K. Goe
man Pott constable, Martin Rosmon.
EDWARDS.
Supervisors, J. H. Stall, chairman,
A. Latterall and G. A. Liepold clerk,
M. A. Scholz treasurer, W. H. Har
ris assessor, H. Johnson justice,
Thygeson constable, A. W Emerson.
VILLAGE OF ATWATER
President, S. M. Sivertson trustees,
O. A. Christenson, O. Elstrom and
Martin Sorenson recorder, N. Wa
len treasurer, Henry Stene justice of
the peace, L. E. Covell constables,
O. Malmberg and G. Anderson.
IRVING.
Chairman, Erick Ellofson supervi
sors, Peter Ruswold and John Ander
son clerk, Peter Hagen treasurer,
John Olson assessor, Charley Kol
berg constable, Greger Johnson.
ROSEVILLE.
Chairman, A. J. Smithson super
visors, Archie Pelkey and Wm. Glenz
clerk, Geo. Haselton treasurer, Mr.
McCurningham justice, Geo. Hasel
ton constables), Ed. Smithson and
Willie Blakely assessor, Fred Smith
son.
LAKE ELIZABETH.
Chairman of supervisors, H. E. Nel
son supervisors. Nels Peterson and
C. E. Johnson, town clerk, G.
Boom treasurer, Nels Rosenquist
justice of the peace, John A Johnson
assessor, Gust. Swedlund.
HOLLAND.
Supervisors, Frank Steflins, chair
man, H. Roelofs, H. Flann clerk,
Henry Roelofs treasurer, A. K.
Kteinhauser assessor, Kingma
justice of the peace, H, Knott con
stable. John Niewenhuis.
ROSELAND.
Supervisors, Oiof Walin chairman,
John Sluka, Wm Hoffman clerk,
Olof Mattson assessor, Olof Bengt-
eon.
ARCTANDER.
Supervisors, Iver Syse chairman,
John Georgeson, Ole Boe clerk, Siver
Iverson treasurer* O. Otterness
assessor, P. Ytterboe constables,
Hans Epgen, Julius Jacobson.
EAST LAKE LILLIAN.
Supervisors. V. Peterson,- chair-
oM, g. ft Awfctttoa etfd Ifeto Holm-
Vol.5. Willmar, Minnesota March 22. 1899.
WILLMAR.
gren: clerk, \L. Owre treasurer,
John Wellin assessor, H. A. Lobnitz
justice, Chr. Rosenmeier constables,
A. Bomsta and Aug. Betzin.
LAKE ANDREW.
Supervisors, J. A. Halvorson,
chairman, C. T. Thorson and C.
Johnson clerk, R. Thorson treasur
er, L. Nelson assessor, Ed. Johnson
justice, G. Stene constable, A. P.
Almquist overseer of poor, R. Thor
son road overseers: 1st district, G.
Stene 2nd, Christ Solberg 3rd,
Gustafson 4th, O. A. Olson.
News Notes from Co. Papers.
A Modern Brotherhood of America
lodge was organized here last Thurs
day evening by Deputy Stegner of
Mountain Lake, and Deputy Sperry
of Willmar. The following officers
were chosen for the ensuing year:
President, O. S. Olson vice president,
Jas. Strong secretary, W Dudley
treasurer, O. A. Christenson conduc
tor, Peter O'Brien chaplain, Rev. C.
E. Davenport medical examiner Dr
Archibald watchman, Marcus Olson
sentry, Charley Bergstrom delegate,
John Henderson alternate delegate,
Charley Hanson. Thirty-two mem
bers joined.—Atwater Republican.
Rev. E. Hedeen of the Swedish
Lutheran church has tendered his
resignation of his pastorate here,
which will take effect in May. He
has not yet decided on his future field
of work.—Atwater Republican.
Thompson Bros, are about to open
a saw mill. We understand sufficient
work has been .guaranteed them to
make them certain of no loss.—New
London cor. in Argus.
We have been informed that Wm«
S. Johnson and his father-in-law, J.
H. Neer, are planning to open a gene
ral store at New London as soon as
they can secure a suitable location.—
New London Times.
Hattie, the little infant daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. A. A. Sperry, is very
low with lung fever and is not expected
to live.—New London Times.
Lars Halvorson, of the Willmar
Gasoline Engine Works, was over to
place in one of his engines at the farm
of O. O. Anderson, of Ringville, last
Saturday. Mr. Halvorson says he\
has more orders for engines than be
ean meet.—New London Times.
The proposition to erect electric
lights and water works (at Belgrade)
was carried by a vote of 67 to 10,
This Certainly looks as though we
were going to have electric lights and
water works.—Belgrade Tribune.
Window:glass$ all sizes, at Carlson
Bros. & Frosl'a.
WILLMAR TRIBUNE
THE BEAVER. Mn
A. PETERSON & CO.
Mikkelson Block. Willmar.
THE BEAVER. fA\
A. PETERSON & CO. kfj
Mikkelson Block, Willmar. ^S\
4
temperance Comment.
bv the
W.O. T, U- of Willmar.l
You may vote to "let the saloon
alone" but it will not "let you alone."
—Rani's Horn.
I
to
"The saloon system largely in
creases our taxes by multiplying
•rime, producing poverty, breeding
nsanity, creating disorder in com
nunities, and lessening the productive
esoUrces of this country. It don't
ay to allow one man to make drunk
ards, and then tax other men to pay
sheriffs, jurors and judges for catch
ing and punishing the drunkard, far
etter punish the drunkard-maker and
stop his business entirely. It don't
pay $o tolerate a business that brings
poverty to thousands of our people,
and then tax quiet, industrious citi
zens^to relieve that poverty." In
•»bort, it is not just to tax the honest
aborer to make good the losses and
•epair the ruin caused by the rummunity
traffic hence every tax payer ought to
vote against it.
Horace Greeley once said "Th
way*,to deal with the liquor traffic is to
tak$ that dog's tail off back of his
necf." That did not mean high
license.
to
Some people say "If we can't enforce
a prohibitory law wouldn't it be better
to hedge it in with high license?" No,
a thousand times, no. If you get on
the side of God and home and do your
duty as a citizen, God will take care
of the results.
This is a serious matter and
that we cannot pass by lightly. "Make
a clain, for the city is full of viol
ene|!" Make a chain to hold down
fast and tight that which is so de
structive to the welfare of our town.
Every man is making a chain and that
chain is no stronger than its weakest
linjc. I makes no difference how per
fect you may be in this or that, the
strength of your chain will be meas
ured by the casting of your ballot.
You talk about it letting you alone!
It lets nobody alone! There is? not a
mother in all this land who sees her
boy coming reeling home drunk (and
there^are many of them right here in
WS£h»ar and vicinity), who deck res
that the saloon lets her alone, al
the* tfgh she lets it alone!
We heard of a young man in the
far west years ago, who inherited
from his father's estate quite a sum
of money—between fifty and one hun
dred thousand dollars. He married
one of the most lovely Christian girls
in the community—beautiful, loved
and respected by all who knew her.
They did what but few ever did in
onehe
25 PER CENT
0—™^^^~^.~^~^~^~~Such as
ULSTERS
OVERCOATS
REEFERS
SUITS
OVERSHOES
GERMAN SOX.
RODLUN & JOHNSON,
those days—took a wedding trip to
Europe. They remained there two
years. This young man coming sud
denly into possession of this great
estate—for it was great in those days
joined clubs, attended the races, got
to drinking and gambling. Losing at
gambliqg, he endeavored to regain the
fortune lost, and went on from bad to
worse, until he became a common
drunkard. During the two years tbey
spent in Europe, a child was born' to
them. At last, as the result of his dis
sipation, they found themselves! al
most penniless they had just enough
to bring them back to New York. He
sold his wife's jewelry and parted with
all the clothing that they could *pare,
to get enough money to take them to
their old home, and when they got
there, she, of course, was broken
hearted, humilated—he, a blear-eyed,
bloated wreck! He had left there but
two years before a bright, sober, high
ly respected young man—a young man
of future, fame, and honor in the com
where he was raised. His
friends rallied around him and tried
to save him, but he had become so de
bauched and profane and brutai, that
he spurned their friendly offers at
last, with the aid of friends and by the
solicitation of his wife, who had been
stricken with consumption, they moved
south in the state, where there was a
good town, but where there were two
or three saloons. It is hard in this
country, outside of a prohibition
state, to find a place where there are
uo saloons. They moved into a cabin
in the outskirts of the town. She was
on a bed of straw, hollow-eyed and
pale—her little boy, then about ten
years of age, her only watcher. While
was with mamma, papa was at the
saloon cleaning out the spittoons for a
drink.
And this poor mother, in her great
distress sinking day by day lower and
lower, not having the comforts of life,
at la9t, one day, in her great agony,
said to her little boy, "Oh, Tommy,
won't you pray for mamma?" Tommy
knelt down and said, O Lord, wilt
Thou look down upon our humble
home? Wilt Thou bless my dear
mamma? Wilt Thou, Lord, relieve her
of her great suffering?"
And then the drunken father came
in, caught him by the hair, threw him
upanthftfiooj^^kicked him and. cuffed
him and beat him, and said, "Now,
you little scoundrel, If I ever come
home and catch you sniffling and
praying over your mother, you leave
this house, never to darken thi& door
again!" And a week later, mamma,
growing weaker, Tomms faithfully
watching by her side, said to him in
her great distress, in her agony, just
able to speak in a whisper—"Tommy,
I pray again." And the little fellow
had scarcely knelt kown when this
OFFER THE FOLLOWING GOODS AT
WINTER CLOTHING
Those who come first will have the best selection.
MAMMA! MAMMA! Those Reefers have a wide collar, you know. What a splendid
thing these cold days, and when I want to-run a race! I can buy one now at RODLUN &
JOHNSON'S for $2.10, and it's a good warm reefer.
''•'V- A.
•. _«. 1 -.- ^.
"t*wl—iiiu.
*.* 4_J
Sdbiefy
No. 6.
KODAKS and
CAMERAS.
ANYTHING IN THE KODAK OR
CAMERA LINE FROM
$2.50 to $38.00.
We have on hand at all times a
complete line of
Photographic
Including DRY PLATES, PRINT
PAPERS, DEVELOPERS. SOLU
TIONS, TRAYS, MOUNTS, AL
BUMS. Etc., Etc.
Catalogue for the asking.
J. H.WIGGINS CO.
WILLMAR, MINN.
brutal father came in and beat him so
cruelly that he could scarcely walk—
his own little boy—his own flesh and
blood—and said to him, "Now, you
little scoundrel, pack up your duds,
leave the house, and never darken this
door again." A drunkard's boy
don't have many to pack, but
he gathered together such as he had
in a little bundle, and went to his
mamma's bedside, laid down his bun
dle, tenderly threw his arms around
her neck and kissed her and said,
'•Good-by, mamma, good-by!"
•'Where are you going, my darling?"
I don't know, mamma, but papa tells
me that I must go away because, mam
ma, I prayed for you but I won't for
get you, mamma: I will remember you.
I will pray for you, mamma, when I
am gone." And then turning to his
brutalized father—brutalized under the
laws of the country in which we iv
he said, in the tenderest tones, "An
papa, I will pray for you, too papa,
I will pray for you."
Did it let the mother alone? Did it
let the little boy alone?
For choice candies call on Maloney
&> Cov Fresh goods always in stock.
Try some of their delicious creams.
DR. NIVEN
will be in A t
water Saturda
,and S un a
March 25th and
26th. First class
work, low prices.
Painless opera-^jt,
tioua in all branches of dentistry
.•""•

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