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Willmar tribune. [volume] (Willmar, Minn.) 1895-1931, January 10, 1906, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89081022/1906-01-10/ed-1/seq-4/

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TNC COMFORTABLE WAV.
WILLMAR STATION
DAILY TRAINS.
Arr. "Puget Sound Express" Dep
9:00 p.m. So. 3. To
Pacific Coast. 0:03 p.m
7:18 p.m. No. 4. To St. Paul 7:20 p.m
Night Passenger, main line.
11:27 p.m. No. 9 To Grand
Porks and Mlnot 11:32 p.m
4:00 a.m. No. 10. To St. Paul 4:05a.no
Night Passenger, Sioux City line.
3:So a. m. No. 52 arrives at Willmar.
No. 51. To Yankton
and Sioux Oity 11:45 p.m
DAILY, EXCEPT SUNDAY.
1:25 p.m. No.13 St.Paul
to Fargo... 2:25 p.m
1:40 p.m. No. 14 Farge
to St.Paul.. 2:25 p.m
1:35 p.m. No.31 Duluth
to SiouxCity 1:80 p.m.
2:15 p.m. No.32 Sioux City
to Duluth 2:35 p.m.
ACOOMMOBATION-Dally exc.Sunday. Dep
No. 572 Going East to
Minneapolis 7:00a.m
No. 587 Going West: to
Breckenriuge8:30 a.m
Ho. 575 Going South to
Garretson.. 8:18 a.m
No 518 Going North to
St. Cloud.. 3:48 p.m
No. 320 Willmar to Watertown
leaves 8:30 a m. arrives U:30 p.m.
for any information concerning the ser
vice rates, schedules, etc., apply to
I.. A. MAY, .Local Ageni
Willmar, Minn
Or write to C. A, STONE,
Gcn'l T. & P. Ag». St. Paul. Minn
8 I O I A N 8
QR. J. M. RAINS,
OFFICKOVER M0S9BERG'S DUUG STORM.
Residence on Litchfield Avenue.
WILLMAR, MINNESOTA
QR. J. R. PETERSEN,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
Office in Bank of Willmar Building.
Room at L. A. Vik residence.
Office 'phone, zW. Night 'phone, 97.
WILLMAR, MINN
A. F. MASMTOR,
DENTIST.
W I A MINN
C. E. GERRETSON,
DENTIST,
WILLMAR, MINK
Office In New Ruble Block.
H. F. PORTER
DENTIST
(SKANDINAVISK TANDLAKARE)
Office in Bonde Block. Phone 279.
WILLMAR, MINN.
H. A. HANSON
DENTIST
SKANDINAVISK TANDUECE
Office over Wennerlund & Nelson's
Jewelry Store.
W I A I N N
A O N E S
GEO. H. OTTERNESS
ATTORNEY AT LAW
COUNTY ATTORNEY KANDIYOHI COUNTY
Office in the Ruble-Block
WILLMAR, MINNESOTA
JNO. M. DOWNS
LAWYER
Real Estate, Insurance and Collections
Office in the Ruble Block
WILLMAR, MINNESOTA
CHARLES JOHNSON
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Office in I. C. Olson Block,
WILLMAR, MINN.
A N S
*..*. BIOS!. President F. O. HANDY, OwhieT
0. 1. LIXR. Vloe President.
BANK OF WILLMAB.
OBQANIZ1D UNDER THB STATU LAWS
CAPITAL AND UNDIVIDED
1100,000.
PROFITS
CARBPUt. ATTENTION TO COLLECTIONS
Drafts on all principal cities of the world anC
steamship tickets to and from Europe.
WARM LOANS AX PUB CBNT IKTBRBBT.
And. Larson, Pres. L. O. Thorpe, Cashier
KANDIYOHI COUNTY BANK.
Organized under the State Lam.
PAID-UP CAPITAL AND 8UKPLUB, 1129,000.00
MONSY O A N O I A 18TAT1
Colleotloos Reooive Prompt and Caraful
Attention.
Bank Corner of Firth Street and Paoiic
Avenue,
WILLMAR. MINNESOTA
O N E S O N
—INSUKANCE—
LOANS, REAL ESTATE, RENTALS
SURETY BONDS AND STEAMSHIP TICKETS
Phone 128
OPERA HOUSE BLDG., WILLMAR, MINN.
MRS. C. A'. LINDQUIST
MIDWIFE
Licensed by State Board.
Am now permanently located here. Calls at
tended to at all hours.
Located at 706 6th St. S.—upstairs. Willmar
Loula XVI.
Louis XVI. had a very heavy, red,
•ensr vl face, with a large Roman nose,
full cuoeks and Hps and a double chin.
There was no trace of more than ordi
nary int2llect either in his face or con
versation, the latter being always com
monplace, often dull. He gave his con
temporaries the Impression of a man
who habitually ate and drank more
than was good for him.
W I A I N E
Published every Wednesday at Willmar, Min
nesota, by The Tribune Printing Company, a
co-partnership consisting of Victor E. Lawson
and J. EmilNel8on.
OFFICE IN TRIBUNE BUILDING.
208 FOURTH-STREET.
Subscription price, $1.50 a year.
[Entered Dec. 5,1903, at Willmar, Minnesota,, ac
second class matter.under actof Mar.3,1879.]
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 1906.
PUBLIC OWNERSHIP vs.PRIVATE
OWNERSHIP IN WILLMAR.
The Gazette is not opposed to mun
icipal ownership but claims that it
is not what it is cracked up to be by
the Tribune. We think the main facts
are as follows:
1. We have had a defaulting re
corder and the money involved was
especially electric light money.
2. Suit has now been brought
against ex-aldermen in an attempt to
show that they connived with the re
corder and were thus responsible for
the defalcation.
3. The electric light service has
during the past year at least been very
unsatisfactory.
4. Many of the principal stores
have quit using the city electric light.
5. Collections have not in the years
past been attended to regularly the
system has been slack.
(i. Hundreds of citizens do not have
the benefit of the city water supply and
cannot get such benefit without paying
out of their own pockets for extension
of water mains.
7. No one knows whether the city
electric light and water supply system
is paying expenses, or is putting the
city deeper in debt every year. If
they do, the Gazette would be glad to
see what figures they have to substan
tiate their position.
We are not against municipal own
ership, but the above mentioned points
are not a "good thing for Willmar."
—The Republican Gazette.
1 and 2.—These are no argu
ments against city ownership. If
dishonest men are elected to of
fice, the community will suffer
under any system, not least
where public service private cor
porations are to be granted priv
ileges and be regulated through
the city council. Although the
most miserable conditions have
existed in times past in regard
to the administration of the city
plant, still its possession by the
city has been prized so much by
the people that none of those who
have coveted the possession of
the same have had the temerity
to make a public campaign in
favor of its sale to some private
corporation. And, besides, the
files of the Gazette will prove that
it fought to the last ditch the
change in city affairs for an hon
est accounting. Even
TRIBUNE
AFTER
the
had proven with cold
figures that old administration
had published a
FALSE
statement
of the financial condition of the
city, the Gazette used all its in
fluence to re-elect the men whom
it now holds out as conclusive ev
idence to prove that municipal
ownership has not been a good
thing for Willmar.
3.—What assurance have we
that the lights would have been
any better under private owner
ship? Does not the handsome
improvement made in the plant
during the past month or two
prove that under public owner
ship there is the quickest possi
ble response to a public demand
for more and better light?
4.—Experiments to obtain a
cheaper light would have been
made under private ownership
as well, but the fact remains that
there is now being used more
electric light than at any time in
the past in this city. In 1898
(a year when John Otos was vil
lage recorder and an accurate ac
counting was made) the receipts
for electric light amounted to
$4,145.25 and water rents, $1,203.
28. In the year ending last
March, the receipts, not includ
ing anything paid by the city for
street lights or fire hydrants,
were $8,060.17 for electric
light and $3,198.19 for water
rents, or again in cash revenue
of $5,879.83 in the last fiscal
year over the year 1898, when
all the stores were using the
city-lights. The superintendent
informs us that at present the
load is the largest that the plant
has ever carried.
5.—The amount of money lost
by the lack of prompt collection
since the turn for the better in
city affairs is very small. There
may be room for improvement,
but conditions are not bad. The
Water and Light Commission and
the City Council have the power
to change the mode of collection
when they deem it practicable.
To adopt the arbitrary system of
requiring each patron to call at
the clerk's office every month to
pay or have his supply of water
and light shut off after ten days
may sound very business like
and be imperative in a large city,
but might not prove best in prac
tice in a small city where the fi
nancial standing of patrons is
known. It will be time enough
to condemn municipal ownership
in Willmar on this account when
it is shown that the city is losing
any appreciable amount under
the present system.
6.—Extensions of water mains
are not made by assessment
against abutting property. Why
try*to mislead the people by bare
faced misstatement of facts like
this? The water mains will be
extended as was the street light
ing system. Having provided
additional street lights and suffi
cient capacity for increase in
light for some time to come, weOtherwise
may reasonably expect that ex
tensions of the water mains will
be the next improvement that
will be made from the earnings
of the plant. Under private own
ership there would be no exten
sion of water mains to the out
skirts until the business secured
thereby would pay for the in
vestment.
7. Does the Gazette wish to
charge that the last annual state
ment as audited and published
was false or misleading as to
the condition of the city plant?
It then behooves that paper to
produce its figures to prove its
contention. The next statement,
we are informed, will show that
fully six thousand dollars will
have been paid for the new im
provement this year at the plant,
from the earnings. When it has
been possible to install such a
splendid improvement and pay
for it as well as the running ex
penses, that ought to convince
the most skeptical that the plant
is not running behind.
If the Gazette were not op
posed to municipal ownership, it
would never bring up such ridic
ulous arguments against the ap
plication of the principle in its
home city. Its statement that
"We are not opposed to munici
pal ownership," looks strange
after just reading in its columns
that the general demand for mu
nicipal ownership would prove
similar to the "free silver craze,"
and would subside when the peo
ple recovered their "sanity." In
other words the Gazette frankly
admits that its own mental bal
ance is affected.
But we believe there is a deep
er purpose in the attack of the
Gazette upon the municipal own
ership idea in its home city. That
the present plant will remain the
city's property is a settled fact,
and no one knows it better than
the editor of the Gazette. But
there is alive issue that will come
up soon before the citizens of
Willmar, and that is the tele
phone question.
In 1907 the franchise given the
Willmar Telephone Exchange will
expire. It is barely possible
that there may be some object
in creating as much sentiment
against public ownership as
possible in order to prevent the
citizens of the city from taking
the franchise into their ownhands
and operating the exchange for
the benefit of the city and its
business enterprises. The alder:
men elected this year will have
a hand in disposing of'this ques
tion.
THE TRIBUNE
believes that this
should be done. It believes it
can be done.
So much having been said about
the attempt at municipal owner
ship in our city, let us take a
look at what private ownership
as exemplified in the telephone
monopoly has done for the city
1. It has occupied the streets
for more than eight years, setting
its poles everywhere and cutting
shade trees to make room for the
wires, and has not paid a single
cent into the city treasury as a
franchise tax, although the net
profits must foot up into the
thousands annually.
2. The service, at least with
a number of 'phrnes, is not the
best by a great deal
3. The subscribers do not get
the full benefit of the splendid
competition furnished by the
long distance lines of the Tri
State company to the twin cities
and other points.
3. The monopoly of the local,
exchange is used as a club with
all connecting local lines to pre
vent competition in* telephone
rates to business points in the
county and vicinity. Thus altho
there are at least three lines to
Spicer, the rate charged to talk
the fifteen miles is thirty cents.
No local or cooperative line is
permitted to connect with the
Willmar exchange unless it
agrees to do no competing busi
ness with the monopoly lines.
5. In effect the result of pri
vate ownership is that' all com
munication from Willmar with
the surrounding territory by
wire is subject to toll, when it
ought to be as free as the high
ways. A municipal exchange
would supply connections to all
on equal terms.
6. If the business is to re
main a monopoly, it must be
owned by the municipality and
run in the interest of the people.
we are certain to be
afflicted with two systems or lo
cal exchanges as are Litchfield
and Albert Lea
We would not urge as an argu
ment against private ownership
that the bills are not collected,
or that they may have dishonest
employes, because the public is
always kept in blissful ignorance
of how the business pays and is
therefore unable to make any
calculation as to the reasonable
ness of rates charged.
PRODUCTION OF GOLD.
The Minneapolis Journal of
Dec. 31 contained a remarkable
article on the gold problem—re
markable because coming from
a republican paper which like all
others of its kind, nine years ago
ridiculed the quantitative theory
of money. It shows the wonderful
increase in gold production since
1895. In 1896 the production for
the first time crossed the $200,
000,000 mark. During the past
year the production reached $1,
000,000 a day and it is figured
that the total production for 1906
will not be less than $400,000,000.
The world's stock of gold avail
able for coinage amounts to over
six billion dollars. About one
half of this has been produced
since 1895.
Following these statistics the
writer discusses the effect of the
increase of the money volume,
from which we quote the follow
ing:
"It is generally conceded that a per
iod of heavy production (of gold) can
not fail to bring advancing prices in
the commercial world. Commodities
and merchandise of all kinds will be
in some degree affected. The general
average of prices will rise.
"History shows that, following the
discovery of America and the sending
back by the later adventurers of the
treasures of Mexico and Peru, a great
wave of activity and advancing prices
swept over Europe. In the past cen
tury the gold discoveries in California
and Australia had the same effect, in
proportion.
"As the gold output increases—as
more gold comes into general use—
commodity prices rise. Gold is like
any other commodity, its value is
governed primarily by the supply and
demand for it. But it is difficult to
think of it in this connection, for, be
ing the measure of all prices, and hav
ing no price outside itself, it is sup
posed by a majority of people to
becan
stable. That a dollar is always a dol
jar is true. But a dollar will not al
ways buy the same measure of the
necessaries or luxuries of life. The
fact is that gold rises and fa Is, and
so, as the quantity in existence per
capita increases, gold becomes worth
less. But it does not appear this way.
Rather there is a generally higher
average of prices for all things sal
able or purchasable. Prices are high.
The cost of living has advanced. A
dollar will no longer go as far as it
formerly went. This is only another
way of saying that gold has fallen.
"As the old year with its $375,000,
000 of new gold, ends, and 1906, with
its promise of $400,0 0,000 comes in,
the tendency for prices to rise is very
marked.
"From 1897, when prices were at
lowest point, to the beginning of 1906,
there has been an advance of 31.
points."
This is certainly good evidence
in favor of the quantitative theory
of money. Our attention wasendeavor.—Christian
called to the article by Dr. John
son, one of the men whom the
Gazette included in its list of
persons who were affected with
the "craze" in 1896, and he made
thefollowing remark whichshows
that he is not yet convinced that
he was "crazy." "That proves
that we were right in demanding
more money, and that the pros
perity came not from the regoverns
publican party but from the
natural increase in the money
volume."
The brilliant craze chaser on
the Gazette has switched off to
fashions, and his mind is worried
with the deep question as to
whether the crinoline was the
product of a "cyaze" or whether
there was some underlying cause
for it. Yes, dear, there is a
cause for it If you had stopped
to think you would have known
that a desire for adornment is
universal in human nature. As
women have for thousands of
years been kept in a very limited
sphere of action they have had
more time to attend to this de
sire, and adornment has become,
a vocation with them. Every
woman is brought up with the
idea that if she wishes to be any
body she must be in style. Hence
the arbiters of style have become
autocrats, and anything they
say goes. It is a necessary part
of adornment that it shall be
novel when the novelty has worn
off the article ceases to attract
attention and becomes common
place. Hence new ideas must
constantly be evolved, and in this
constant chase for novelty it is
no wonder that some very ridi
culous ideas are used. But
"fashion" rules, and the women
must adopt the prescribed cos
tume or be classed as "peculiar."
The crinoline looked as ridiculous
as some of the Gazette's argu
ments, but it was the prescribed
thing, and it was therefore used.
If it was a "craze".then all fash
ions are "crazes," and humanity
as a whole is permanently crazy.
With this we must leave the
Gazette to continue its researches
in mental diseases. It seems to
have the "craze" for that, but we
cannot afford to waste any more
space on such nonsense.
The Gazette gets very excited
over our statement that the free
silver idea of 1896 has never had
a fair trial, and points to the fact
that we had free silver up to
1873. We thought there was not
an intelligent person anywhere
that did not know the difference
between the conditions prior to
1873 and after that time. Prior
to that time practically all na
tions had the free silver coinage,
at a ratio of either 16 to 1 or 15|
to 1. In 1896 the European courr
tries did not have the free silver
coinage, and it was the main
argument of the gold bugs that
this country could not maintain
the standard without the aid of
the European countries. It will
be remembered that McKinley
expressed himself in favor of
bimetallism, provided the powers
of Europe would agree to it, and
he even sent a commission over
to try to arrange for interna
tional bimetallism. Thus both
platforms of 1896 were practic
ally in favor of free silver the
only question being whether or
not this country was big enough
to manage its own monetary
matters, or was a vassal of the
European powers. That ques
tion has not been put to the prac
tical test
The Gazette is very anxious to
discuss the silver question. We
must gently but firmly decline.
While we have resented the im
putation that half ot the Ameri
people were crazy in 1896,
we cannot enter upon a discus
sion on a question that is not at
the present time before the peo
pie. We have repeatedly stated
that the great gold supply has
for some time settled the ques
tion of money metal, and on that
we rest our case at present.
^UOTATIOfiS
Selected for the TRIBUNE by
MARTIN A. ANDERSON.
The government of the people by the
people and for the people shall not
perish from the earth.—A. Lincoln.
Educate the people to demand better
methods and better officials.-— S S.
Parr.
It is not what we are, but what we
ought to be, that should stimulate our
Cynosure.
Happiness is not the end of life
character is —H. W. Beecher.
Character is higher than intellect.
A great soul will be strong to live, as
well as to think.—Emerson.
Not genius, nor learning, nor talent
the world, but character.—
Prof. W. E. Svedelius.
To be able to discern that what is
Let us serve you.
Our charges are reasonable.
true is true, and what is false is false,
this is the maik and character of in
telligence. —Emerson.
Human na'ture is like water: once
started on the downward way it will,
if unrestrained, seek the lowest level
before it stops.—Christian Cynolure.
Every good deed helps make a track
for others.—Barn's Horn.
It is hard to fail, but it is worse
never to have tried to succeed.—Theo
dore Roosevelt.
Every time you stifle a good impulse
you make it harder to start the next
one.—Barn's Horn.
A man who lacks moral courage to
face a great evil has always much to
say about how impractical other peo
ple are.—Christian Cynosure.
You are never so near to victory as
when defeated in a good cause.—H
W. Beecher.
Nothing will ruin the country if the
people themselves will undertake its
safety and nothing can save it if they
leave that safety in any hands but
their
own.<p></p>Prohibitiol
D.m Webster.„
HIGH CLASS UNDERTAKING SUPPLIES
Andrew Peterson
LICENSED EMBALMER
1 1
Presst
Bulletin
The date of the state Prohibition
Convention has been set for March
7, 1906. The basis of representation
is still to be determined upon.
There is a statement going the
rounds of the public press to the effect
that many of the army officers are
actively seeking to influence congress
to re-establish the canteen in the army
posts. The reason assigned is that
there is "good graft" in it for minor
officers. In any event it seems that
an explanation might be in order that
such officers as General Mites, Schaf
ter, "Fighting" Joe Wheeler, and
others of high rank, are against the
canteen, while so many of the "tin"
soldiers stand for it.
We raise as much wheat, churn as
much butter, do as much business and
seem to be just as happy from the baby
to grand-dad under democratic John
son as we were under republican Van
Sant. The present indications are
that the time will come, and that with
out much delay, when a political party
within a state will have to stand for
some state polity, or vanish from the
map. There are certainly enough
matters of vital interest to this state,
entirely apart from national interests,
to form the basis of political action
and a political party. The plain
everyday, hard fisted, weather beaten
voter has already advanced to
theday0
point where he refuses to vote for a
yellow dog simply because he wears a
familiar political tag.
The newspapers are flooded with a
wail of woe from Kansas City, Mo.,
on account of the closing of saloons
in that city by the order of Governor
Folk But that the wail is inspired
by the saloon element is very evident
from the fact that arrests for drunk
enness and disorder have decreased.
Armour, head of the Armour Packing
Co., says: "With the saloon closed
on Sunday workmen who sometimes
laid off on Monday or came to work
feeling badly, come now as bright on
Monday as any other day."
The "stay-at-home" on election day
is a menace to government of the peo
ple, for the people and by the people.
George F. Loftus shows that the peo
ple of Minnesota paid at the rate of
24 million dollars more for given rail
road service than did the people of
Iowa who have some legislation pro
tecting them from exorbitant rates.
That means about $12.00 per year for
each person, or $60.00 per year for
each family of five. How much more
the oil trust, the beef trust, the coal
trust and all the rest of the litter that
trust the people to feed them fat is
hard to tell.
But that the saloon eats up more
than all the dividends paid by all the
trusts every year is a mathematical
certainty—and after the trusts have
robbed a man they leave him untar
nished in his manhood, while the smal
ler part of the saloon's plunder is the
billions of money it filches.
The Minneapolis Commercial Club
showed good spirit toward the may
or's Sunday closing order when they
voluntarily closed their groggery on
Sunday.
Gov. La Follette seems to have de
termined to go to the U. S. senate to
which he was elected some months
since. This means that he must
resign the governorship of Wis
consin. But, even if he does, the
boys in the legislature can depend up
on his "bobbing up" if they start to
play hookey with the interests of the
people on railroad rates.
The campaign of Oliver W. Stewart
of Chicago and W. G. Calderwood,
secretary of the state prohibition com
mittee in the interest of electing pro-
Corner 6th St. and Pacific Ave,
WILLMAR, MINN.
"Head and
Shoulders"
Above competitors is
where we stand in the
photographic line. It's
a lively pace we're set
ting for others, and all
because folks will come
to us for pictures.
onme NewYeoi
have a sentiment at
tached that's prized.
We touch them up toe,
a little extra. There's
none better than our
pictures. Try them.
C. A. BAKLUND
he Photographer
WILLMAR
hibitionists reached 11,293 hearers in
the northern part of the state and re
sulted in the addition of $7,576.49 to
the campaign fund.
Beginning January 7 the same team
re-entered the field, holding a county
conference every day from 10:30 a. m.
to 4 p. m. with basket dinner. The
speakers separate for two night meet
ings in other towns, making three
meetings daily for upwards of sixty
days. This will be the most compre
hensive campaign in the history of the
prohibition agitation.
For years Vermont was under a pro
hibitory law which was so weak in its
provision and the republican party
had been so lax in its enforcement
that it was largely ineffective. Li
cense was substituted. Under license
crime has increased and population
decreased. After two years trial the
local prohibition has reduced the li-Tremont
cense towns by two thirds. One thing
that marks the liquor question as the
living question is that it will not
down. The only solution of the sa
loon question is no saloon.
Osterholm's
Chase.
VALDA DIKTER siiljes hos
3114
Notice for Hearing Petition for Vaca
tion of Certain Streets.
Whereas, a petition in due form has been
presented to the city council of the city of
Willmar signed by the majority of the own
ers of the property on the line or lines of the
street or streets proposed to be vacated and
for three hundred feet in each direction from
the end or ends of the streets proposed to be
vacated, and the said eitv council has de
termined that it is expedient to proceed to a
hearing of the said petition and has ordered
the said petition to be filed with the city
clerk of said cit3'
Therefore notice is hereby given that the
said petition has been dulv filed in the office
of the city clerk of the city of Willmar, and
that the said petition will be heard by the
city council oi the eitv of Willmar on the 12th
of February, A. D. 1906, at the hour of
8:0 o'clock p. m.. at the council chambers
in the Library Building in the said city.
The streets or parts of streets so proposed
to be vacated are described as follows: All
of Fourteenth street Iving south of the north
line of Block 123 and north of the right of
way of the Willmar and Sioux Falls Rail
way Company all that portion of Twelfth
street lying between Blocks 105 and 106 and
between Blocks 104 and 107 as shown upon
the plat filed with the said petition all
of300,000.
Eleventh street lying between Blocks 13 and
105 all of Pacific avenue Iving between
Blocks 122 and 123, and between Blocks
106 and 107 and between Blocks 104 and
105 except the south half of said avenue Iv
ing north of lots 1 to 7 both inclusive of
Block 104: all that part of Benson avenue
lying between Blocks 121 and 122 and be
tween Blocks 107 and 10S except the south
half of said avenue Iving north of lots 1, 2
and 3 of Block 103.
Dated January 2nd, 1906.
J- T. OTOS,
City Clerk of the Citv of Willmar, Minnesota.
472
[First publication Dec. 27.
ORDER. TO EXAMINE ACCOUNTS,ETC.
STATE OF MINNESOTA, I
County of Kandiyobi.
In Probate Court. Dec.'26 1905.
In the matter of the estate of Christen Aren
son, deceased.
On reading and filing the peti ion of Johan Ed
vart Anderson, executor of the estateof Chis
ten Arensm. deceased, representing, among
other things, that he has fullv administered
said estate, and praying that a time and place
be fixed for examining and allowing the ac
count of his administration, and for the as
signment of the residue of said estate to the
parties enti.led-thereto by law:
It is Ordered, That said account be exam
ined, and petition and application be beard, by
this Court, on Tuesday the 23rd day of January,
1905, A. D.. at 10 o'clock a. m., at the probate
office in Willmor in «aia county.
And it is Further Ordered, Tbatnotice there
of be given to all persons interested by pun
ching this order once in each week for three
sacces&ive weeks prior to said day of hearing
in the S illmar Tribune, a weekly newspaper
printed and published at Willmar in said coun
ty
Dated at Willmar the 26th day of December
A. D. 1905.
By the Court:
[SEAL.] A. F. NORDIN,
Judge of Probate.
JOHN T. OTOS,
ABSTRACTER AND CONVEYANCER
Abstracts of Title to lands in Kan
diyohi County furnished promptly,
^EAL ESTATE, INSURANCE
AND STEAMSHIP TICKETS.
Office la Bank of Willmar building.
Phone 941 WTL.T.WAR. MTWT.
8
DAMES AND DAUGHTERS.
One of the most successful design
ers of stained glass windows in Ameri
ca is Miss Mary Tillinghast of New
York.
Miss Archer, the daughter and heir
ess of the late Fred Archer, the famous
English jockey, has come of age and
enters into possession of her fortune
of about $600,000.
Cornelia, countess of Craven, for
merly Miss Bradley-Martin of New
York, whose marriage at the age of
Bixteen was a sensation some years
Ago, is regarded as one of the best
dressed women in England.
Miss Rebecca Collier, the grand
daughter of the late T. De Witt Tal
tnage, is said to be weary of society's
frivolities and to be pining for a chance
to study law. Her father, grandfa
ther and great-grandfather were
Judges.
Mrs. Abram Lansing of Albany, N.
Y., will present Rome, N. Y., with a
fine statue of General Peter Ganse
voort, who was in command of Fort
Stanwix at its siege during the early
and troublous days in the Mohawk
valley. Mrs. Lansing is a granddaugh
ter of General Gansevoort.
There is one woman in France—Mme.
Dieulafoy—who has official permission
to dress always as a man. She accom
panies her husband on his famous
travels of exploration in the east, and
in the dim places where the two dis
covered the palaces of -Darius I. and
Artaxerxes II. it is safer to be a man
than a woman.
Margaret Jessie Chung, a sixteen
year-old girl of Chinese parentage liv
ing at Los Angeles, Cal., has become a
newspaper reporter there. She Is
teaching English in the Chinese colony
of that city and for a year past has
been secretary of a church memorial
union. Miss Chung is American in
spirit, dress and ambition.
CHURCH AND CLERGY.
The present pope Is the first pontiff
of the Roman Catholic church to in
dulge in cigars.
Rev. William Howe, founder of the
temple, Boston, and said to be
the oldest Baptist clergyman living,
will be a hundred years old on May 26,
1906. He lives at Cambridge, Mass.
Archbishop Williams of Boston, who
recently underwent a second operation
for cataracts on his eyes, is at home
with improved eyesight. His eyes are
still weak, not having recovered from
the effects of the operation.
Rev. Frank Okazaki, pastor of the
Japanese Baptist mission In Seattle,
supported by leading Christian Japa
nese residents, is planning to establish
a colony for Immigrants from his coun
try somewhere on Puget sound.
The Rev. H. Olin Cady, now of
Evanston, 111., who has been connected
with Methodist missions in west China
for the last nineteen years, has been
retired with a pension by the board of
managers of the Missionary society.
GLEANINGS.
In Germany it is the newcomer's
duty to make the first social call.
Antwerp's docks and wharfs are
among the finest on the globe, and it
Is spending $50,000,000 to improve
them, although its population is only
Actors are never stranded in Rus
sia, because when a manager takes a
company touring he must deposit with
the government enough money to bring
all safely home.
Photographs of 25,704 criminals are
pigeonholed at the central Berlin po
lice office, an increase of 5,000 since
1900. Of these burglars are in the ma
jority, with 4,318 photographs.
Five Famous Trains
and why you should use them.
A Yt\
4.00 pm
7.20
8.35 pm
11.00 pm
To promote thrift the town council
of Callenberg, Saxony, has decided to
present every child at its birth with a
savings bank book and a small deposit.
No withdrawals will be allowed until
the young depositor reaches the age
of fourteen, except in case of death.
THE WRITERS.
Miss Marie Corelli is slowly writing:
a new novel. She is reported to have
chosen a very singular and beautiful
subject for treatment.
Mr. Arthur Morrison, the novelist,
has a hobby—Japanese art. He is writ
ing a book on "The Painters of Ja
pan," and writing it with great pains
taking in the pursuit of information.
A statue to a British novelist is soon
to be erected in North Devon. This is
the Charles Kingsley memorial, for
which a site at Bideford has been
chosen. It was at Bideford that Kings
ley wrote "Westward Ho."
Gilbert Watson, the travel writer,
began a novel when he was eleven
years old. He has not finished It yet
and probably never will complete that
particular narrative. But he has been
twice around the world and has seen
most countries intimately.
E A
*Kj\J CL MW. To Milwaukee and.Chicago. Past the gi
EXPRESS
Chicago Pas the grand
scenery of the Mississippi river by daylight.
THE AFTERNOON EXPRESS
To Dubuque. Rock Island and Chicago.
Best train for lower Mississippi river points.
E A S MAI
To Milwaukee and Chicago.
Fastest train from Twin Cities to Chicago.
THE PIONEER LIMITED
To Milwaukee and Chicago Preferred Train
of all others for first-class travel to Chicago.
THE NIGHT EXPRESS
To Milwaukee and Chicago.
Splendid Train for Late Night Travelers.
LONGER, HIGHER AND WIDER BERTHS.
FROM ST. PAUL EVERY DAY VIA THE
Chicago
Milwaukee & St. Paul
Railway
DIXON, Northwestern Passenger Agent Saint Panl
S
hi
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