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Willmar tribune. [volume] (Willmar, Minn.) 1895-1931, June 19, 1907, Image 1

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89081022/1907-06-19/ed-1/seq-1/

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A son was born to Co. Supt. and
Mrs. W. D. Frederickson last Sun
day.
A chimney fire west of the mill
called out the fire department last
Thursday. No damage to property
was done.
The concert given by the Arpi
Quartet was greatly enjoyed by all
who were present. The boys are a
good advertisement for their school.
—Hector Mirror.
Arthur H. Erickson met with the
misfortune of having a very valu
able horse cut on a barb wire fence
and very seriously injured. It was
a valuable animal and Arthur feels
his bad luck very deeply.
During the thunder storm last
Sunday night lightning struck the
barn of John 0. Nelson, about half
a mile from New London. All the
cattle were stunned by the bolt,
but no serious damage was done.
Mr. Nelson was in the barn at theo'clock
time, but escaped injury.
M. W. Spicer and wife went to
Flandreau, N. D., last Monday to
attend a racing meet of the Corn
Belt Circuit. Mr. Spicer has two
horses in the circuit this year, El
nor S. of the 2:25 class who won
distinction last year on the tracks,
and Joseph Medayto, who is a pa-when
cer, but has never been in a race
before. We hope Mr. Spicer's
horses will make a good account of
themselves.
A. D. Kleinman of Minneapolis,
formerly of Hutchinson, Minn., has
taken possession of the Willmar
Furniture Co.'sjfurniture business.
Mr. Martin Olson traded the same
for a tract of land, 240 acres,
twelve miles from Ada, Minn., the
consideration named being $9,720.
The deal was made thru the A. H.
Brown Land Agency of this city.
Mr. Kleinman will continue the
business under the name of
thestopped
Willmar Furniture Co.
Ole J. Nickelson has recently
made some very substantial im
provements at the Commercial Ho
tel. He has re-arranged and imphone
proved the office and laid hardwood
floors. He has recently installed
new ranges in the kitchen. The
park h&<has started on the future
site of his $50,000 three-story brick
hotel has blossomed out with all the
freshness of early summer, and
makes the property look very neat
and inviting.
Mrs. Axel Nelson and children,
of Minneapolis, came up last Thurs
day from Kandiyohi where they at
tended the Cederstrom-Johnson wed
ding. Mr. Nelson accompanied his
family to Kandiyohi and returned
to Minneapolis on Thursday morn
ing. Mrs. Nelson and the children
will visit for a week with her par
ents in town of Whitefield. The
Nelson family were Willmar resi
dents until the first of last May.
They are now nicely located in their
new home in N. E. Minneapolis.
A. P. Adams made a deal last
week, whereby J. C. Steenson of
Hills, Minnesota, became the owner
of the 320 acres in section 16, town
of Whitefield, belonging to Peder
A. Roen, residing in town of Will
mar, and Mr. Roen became the
owner of the finest residence in the
village of Hills, Rock county, Min
nesota. The consideration paid for
the land was $40 per acre, and the
consideration that Mr. Roen paid
for the house was $8000. The
papers were transferred on last
Thursday.
The discount season is at hand.
If you ever attended our sales, you
know what this means. If you
have not, you'll do well to investi
gate. THE PROGRESS.
WILLMA
DROWNED IN
DIAMONDLAKE
L. W. Harris of Atwater
Found DeathWhile
Out Fishing.
Louis W. Harris, a jeweler in
Atwater, drowned at Diamond Lake
last Sunday at about noon, the boat
having capsized in the strong wind.
The people in the eastern part of
the county were terribly shocked
last Sunday to hear of the untimely
death of Louis W. Harris, which
occurred in the manner stated.
With a companion, Charles Hanson,
the unfortunate man left Atwater
early Sunday morning for a day's
fishing at Diamond Lake. They
were fishing along the south shore
opposite the Peter Larson cottage.
Some little time after twelve
the boat capsized. The
wind blew quite hard and the waves
were running high. Both Harris
and Hanson started to swim for
shore. Hanson, however, became
tangled in the anchor rope and could
make no headway and clung to the
boat. Harris struck out sturdily
for the shore but had not gone far
he was taken with cramps.
He called out, "Help, I can't make
it." Hanson called out, "Just a
minute, I'll be there." Hanson
was not more than ten feet away
when Harris sank for the last time,
and Hanson could render no assist
ance. George Larson and Charles
Whitcomb.were in another boat not
far away and pulled for the strug
gling men as fast as they could and
pulled Hanson into their boat.
Meanwhile Michael Wheeler ar
rived from the shore with a garden
rake and the lost man was found
after having been under water
about twenty minutes. His watch
at 12:40 o'clock. He was
found near the shore and the water
was no more than six feet deep.
Hard work was done in attempts to
restore life. Thanks to the tele
and automobile, Dr. Branton
of Atwater arrived on the scene
within half an hour of the accident,
but all efforts were in vain. The
body was taken to Charles Fergu
son's place near by, and to Atwater
in the evening.
The deceased was the third son
of Joseph D. and Addie Harris,
early settlers on the north shore of
Diamond Lake, and had attained
the age of about forty years. He
had been in business at Atwater
about two years. He was previous
ly located at Ross, N. D. He leaves
to mourn him a wife and three chil
dren, all boys: Lawrence, age 15
Rubert, age 12 Dale, age 9 years.
His mother survives him, as do two
brothers and one sister—Frank
Harris of Spicer, Irving Harris of
Camden, Wash., and Mrs. Peter
Burns of Kandiyohi. The stricken
ones command the sympathy of the
entire community.
The funeral is held today. Ser
vices were conducted this morning
at the Presbyterian church in At
water by Rev. Akers. The inter
ment takes place at the Oakside
cemetery of Harrison.
The Litcfield Independent of yes
terday publishes the following ac
count of the sad affair:
Chicago Report on
Copper Creek Properties
During the month of February Edmond J. Harbin of the
Edward Hines Lumber Co. and Clayton P. Lardie of McCarthy
& Lardie, commission merchants of Chicago, stockholders in
Copper Creek Mining Company, visited the property not only
for the purpose of satisfying themselves but for the benefit of
friends who held stock. On their return from the mine they
made a complete report of what they found. Copies of this
report can be had by addressing the undersigned or calling at
mine or Walter DeLaHunt's office. Get a copy of this report
and see what the investors think about the property after hav
ing had an opportunity to look it over.
Copies of the last annual statement can also be had for
the asking.
P. S. See our ad. on page five in this issue.
Yours truly,
A
We learn that Mr. Harris and
Charles Hanson had gone to Dia
mond Lake Sunday on a fishing ex
cursion. They decided to make
a catch for the noon day meal and
went down to the beach and pushed
out the boat. The craft had not
been in the water for some time
and they soon found that it leaked
badly. Realizing the danger they
were in, the anchor was dropped
ife'*..
only a short distance from the shore
and they started to still fish. The
water continued to enter the boat
and when it had apparently reached
the danger mark, they started to
pull up the anchor with the inten
tion of going to shore and empty
ing out the water. When about to
pull the anchor over the gunwale
on one side the boat lost its equilib
rium and the water running to that
side caused a tip over. Hanson
in
"•r.sSrtj!
*4£.
itlr^^^^Il^f^ -t^^#^^? MikL
One lot Men's All Worsted
fancy weave blue serge
Suits, former price $13 50
sacrifice price
$9.50
One lot of Men's Suits, for
rner price $12 50 to $14,
sacrifice price,
$9.50
One lot of Men's Suits,
former price $10 and $11,
sacrifice price,
$6.75
One lot of Men's Suits, for
mer price $15 to $18, sac
rifice price,
$12.50
One lot of Men's Suits, all
small sizes, some of them
slightly faded, former
price from $8 to $15, sac
rifice price,
$3.75
VOLUME 13. WILLMAR, MINNESOTA, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 1907. NUMBER 18.
some way became entangled in thegle
anchor rope, necessitating immedi
ate assistance. The distance to
shore seemed comparatively short
and Harris decided to swim it andcovered.
then get another boat and relieve
Hanson. He left the boat but soon
found that weighted down by heavy
clothes progress was slow and final
ly when almost close enough to
touch bottom, in about six or seven
feet of water, he gave up the strug-
a ,' ••^A*^'*f
and went under. Hanson was
soon relieved from his strained po
sition and the body of the drowned
man was almost immediately re-
ipINANCIAL
One lot of Young Men's
Suits, so me of them
slightly faded, former
prices from $5 to $10, sac
rifice price,
$3.50
One lot Young Men's Suits,
to close at
$1.50
One lot of Children's Suits,
sizes from 3 to 7 years,
ranging in prices from
$2 25 to $5, sacrifice price,
$1.00
One lot of Children's Wash
Suits to close at
45c
Boys' Wool Knee Pants, 50
and 75c quality, sacrifice
price,
35c
If*
Wf
'£?$%: J*
The funeral will take place to
morrow under the auspices of theleaning
M. W. A. and I. O. O. F. lodges.
Mr. and Mrs. A. G. Hedin re
turned last Saturday evening from
their extended wedding tour.
Grea
Fireman Injnred.
Matt Auer, the fireman, met with
a serious accident last Friday night.
Mr. Auer is firing one of the switch
engines in the yard. At about 2:30
o'clock Saturday morning, while
out of the cab window, he
was struck in the face by a box car
that had carelessly been left too near
theend of one of the tracks. Luck
ily the engine was not moving very
fast, or the accident must have
Sacrific Sale
GILBER O SAN CO
ONE-PRICE CLOTHIERS
-.
TRIBUNE
NECESSITIES in our business during the
next month have induced us to prepare a line of bar
gains at our store that will astonish you. We are under
obligation to raise $5,000 by the middle of July, and we
propose to raise same by selling goods at such prices as
will bring us the coin quickly.
Qjir necessity will be your opportunity, and it will be
an opportunity that you will not meet very often surely
not again tiiis season. Prices are DOWN! DOWN! DOWN!
Goods are taken from our regular stock of first-class, de
pendable goods. No sweat-shop or fire-sale trash is per
mitted upon our counters. Come and investigate our
prices! IT WILL PAY YOU WELL!
SALE COMMENCES FRIDAY MORNING JUNE 21, AT 9 O'CLOCK, AND CONTINUES UNTIL WEDNESDAY, JULY 3
«*S^v
proven fatal. He was fearfully
gashed over one eye and six stitches
had to be taken by the company sur
geon to bring the wounded parts to
gether. He was taken from the
doctoi's office to his room at 217
Litchfield avenue west, where he is
doing as well as might be expected
under the circumstances.
W. J. Pinney is on a business
trip to HaywaJd, Wis.
Men's Negligee Shirts, 50
and 65c quality, sacrifice
price,
38c
Men's Negligee Shirts, $1
quality, sacrifice price,
65c
Men's Working Shirts,
black sateen, black twill
and fancy,
45c
Men's Fancy Socks,
quality, now
10c
Men's Heavy
Socks, 'Tf»
All Straw Hats go at
80c
on the dollar
We are also offering
gains in Shoes.
i£US
HISTORICAL
SOCIETY,
LUTHERAN SYNOD CHURCH.
Next Sunday no services in the
Willmar church Services at the
Solomon Lake church at 10:30 a. m.
....Sunday, June 30, services in
English at the Willmar church at
10:30 The sewing circle meets
next Saturday at 2:30 p. m. Lem
onade and cake will be served....
The East Vinje Ladies' society
meets with Mrs. Bertinus Kiland
Friday, June] 28.
Wfm£&

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