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Willmar tribune. [volume] (Willmar, Minn.) 1895-1931, December 04, 1912, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89081022/1912-12-04/ed-1/seq-3/

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Tl^ FRE
E Da
NEWS FROM FATHERLAND
Frau Cosima Wagner, the widow of
the great composer, is seriously ill.
In addition to heart troubles, she is
feverish. Prof. Schweninger has been
called to her sickbed.
The budget of expenses of the Ger
man empire for the coming year is
put at $762,000,000, or about $74,000,
000 more than for the previous year.
The navy will take about $119,250,000.
It was said some time ago that King
Otto of Bayern, who has been insane
for a great many years, was so low
that he might not live long. But now
the court physician announces that
the king's ailment is not serious.
The latent improved sewing machine, The FREE, given
away absolutely without cost
A Brief Resume of the Most Im
portant Happenings in the
German Empire.
Philipp Scheidemann, a Social-Dem
ocratic leader and a member of the
German reichstag, said at a Socialist
meeting in Paris that German prole
tairs would not fire on their French
fellows in case of war between their
countries.
Tfce Poles in the German reichstag
and the Prussian landtag have issued
a fiery protest against the enforce
ment of the expropriation laws of
East Prussia. The aim of the laws
is to assist Germans in settling in
Polish communities.
The cigar dealers of Germany held
a convention in Mainz and resolved
to put up a stiff fight against the
American tobacco trust. The first
Btep will be a general boycott against
those dealers who handle the goods
Of the American tobacco trust.
The protracted struggle about the
adoption of a constitution of Mecklen
burg has entered a new stage. The
grand dukes of Mecklenburg-Schwerin
and Mecklenberg-Strelitz have again
committed themselves on this quesr
tion, which is so important to their
countries. After the knighthood had
pimply rejected the proposed constitu
tion, the grand dukes notified the es
tates that they demand a thorough
discussion of the constitution, and
that they resent the action of the
knighthood, which does not tally with
the importance of the matter.
DECEMBER 7th, 3 P. M.
SOMEONE
Berlin.—With the bill creating a
government oil monopoly coming up
in the reichstag, the Standard Oil
company's press bureau here is work
ing overtime. The Standard evident
ly hopes for little diplomatic opposi
tion from Washington to the German
tttempt to end its operations in the
fatherland, and has centered all its
efforts on a publicity campaign. The
company contends in newspapers that
Germany cannot get along without the
Standard, and that no government
ccntrolled monopoly can sell petrol
jum as cheaply as the Standard can.
Prospects for defeating the measure
dre considered very poor.
Kaiser Wilhelm is to get a new
yacht to replace the 19-year-old
Hohenzollern, and the reichstag will
be asked to grant an appropriation of
11,500,000 to furnish the most modern
and the most speedy yacht possessed
by any ruler. In the new naval esti
mate for 1913 Admiral von Tirpitz,
the naval secretary, declared that he
was unable much longer to be respon
sible for the seaworthiness of the
Hohenzollern, which goes so slowly
that It was not able to keep up with
the fleet during the maneuvers. The
new yacht will have a turbine engine
and may he used as a scout vessel in
the event of war.
vLike other European countries,
Germany has taken up the fight
against the ever-menacing "American
Invasion," and automobiles manufac
tured in this country are far from
popular with manufacturers there, ac
sordine to_H. JL-Barper^exDorL man-
in the audience at our big
demonstration on the above date
is sure to get this valuable pres
ent, and whoever that one may be,
will have the best sewing machine
manufactured. A thousand dollars
could buy no better, for there is no
better made.
The time is growing short—If you
have not filled out and returned your
coupon, do it to-day. Anyone who has not received a coupon
is invited to call and get one. No purchase or money consider
ation will be required. Come and see the machine—we will
gladly explain its advantages to you.
NELSO
N MUSIC CO
105 Flilb Street Wlllmar, Minn.
ager for the" Willys-Overland C67, of
Toledo, Ohio, who lately returned
from a trip of several months abroad.
"American-made automobiles are to
be discredited at any cost in Germany,
If the manufacturers of that country
have their way," says Mr. Harper.
"Newspapers are devoting both news
and editorial columns calling atten
tion to the Tankee peril,' and makers
are devoting almost as much energy
toward keeping out the foreign prod
acts as they are to the development
of their own cars."
Munich.—^As a protection of young
girls leaving the country to Join the
atrical companies or troupes as va
riety singers and dancers, the Bava
rian minister of the interior has is
sued a, decree to the effect that be
fore being allowed to leave Bavaria
young girls will have to obtain a writ
ten testimonial from their parents or
legal guardians that the journey is
being undertaken with their consent.
This testimonial will then be ex
changed by the police authorities for
a pass. Should, however, the authori
ties have reason to believe that the
errand is a doubtful one, even if the
parents state that they have made in
vestigations, power is given to hinder
the journey by placing the girls as
wards in chancery, withholding the
pass until satisfactory investigations
have been made through reliable
sources.
Carlisle Kawbawgam, a full-blooded
American Indian, is nailed by the
critics of Berlin and Vienna as the
latest star of the operatic horizon.
After a series of successful appear
ances in Berlin, he is now singing in
the Austrian capital, which has chris
tened him "the red Caruso." Kaw
bawgam, who is a graduate of the
Carlisle Indian school, stands fully
six feet Is 26 years old, and possesses
a tenor voice of the richest quality.
The armored cruiser Goeben, which
is on guard at Constantinople, has
kept up a constant wireless connec
tion with the flagship Deutschland.
Sporting
Wabbling on leaden legs, hit eyes
glazed, and his body reeling, Ad Wol
gast fouled Willie Ritchie twice in the
sixteenth round of their fight at Daly
City, Cal. With the wave of Referee
Jim Griffin's hand, which disqualified
him, the lightweight championship of
the world passed for the first time in
Queensberry history into the keeping
of a California boy.
Politics
Governor Goldsborough of Maryland
has appointed William P. Jackson,
Republican national committeeman
from Maryland, to succeed the late
I tlnited States Senator Isidor Rayner.
He will serve until the legislature
meets in January, 1914.
The official vote of Maine for presi
dent was announced by the governor
end council as follows: Wilson, 61,
113 Roosevelt, 48,493 Taft, 26,545
Debs, 2,541 Chafln. 945.
The constitutional amendment pro
viding woman suffrage In Michigan
was defeated by 594 votes, according
to figures compiled In the secretary
pf state's office at Lansing from
every county in Michigan.
Leaders of the Republican party
from every state In the Union are to
assemble in New York December 14
for a series of conferences to devise
plans for a great forward movement
py the party and to map out a pro
gram for the next four years. Presl
flent Taft will be the principal speak
er at a banquet in the evening.
Personal
The National Woman Suffrage con*
rentlon at Philadelphia re-elected Dr.
Anna Howard Shaw nraaldent
Would You Be Pleased With Our Work
Probably the most convinc
ing argument that we can
present that we submit proofs
until you are satisfied that
your likeness is both pleasing
and correct.
The quality of our Portraits
is evidenced by the fact that
we have an ever-increasing
patronage.
It will be our pleasure to
show you some of the latest
ideas at the Studio for Christ-
mas.
OLSON BROS.
MINN. AGRICULTURAL DEVELOP.
MENT CONGRESS TO BE
NEW NAME.
APPROPRIATION ASKED.
Governor Eberhart and Maude
lington Booth Close Ses
sions Saturday
Bal*
Night. i,
Minneapolis.—The Minnesota con
servation and agricultural congress
baa become a permanent organization.
The word "Conservation" has been
dropped from its name, however.
It was unanimously decided at Sat
urday morning's session that another
meeting should be held next year and
annually thereafter. The name of the
organization will be the Minnesota Ag
ricultural Development congress.
A resolution was passed asking the
legislature to pass a law authorizing
the governor to appoint a Minnesota
agricultural development commission.
The legislature will be asked to ap
propriate enough money to take care
pf the permanent organization. It
was also decided to have the perma
nent chairman of the congress draft
the bill.
Time Debated.
There was some debate regarding
the time for the next meeting. Some
wanted it to take place the first week
In December of next year and others
wanted it the first week in January,
1914. The matter was finally left to
the executive board for decision.
Dan A. Wallace, of St. Paul, advo
cated a state agricultural department
to take up the work now being done
by a large number of boards, in an
address delivered at the conservation
congress Saturday morning.
"In studying the work which other
states are doing for agriculture, it
Beems to me that it would be an emi
nently practical idea for us to have
in the state of Minnesota a depart
ment or commission of agriculture, in
stead of having a confusion of boards
and commissions for the administra
tion of agricultural affairs of the
Btate," he said. "Why should we not
pupplant this idea with a systematized
organization of bureaus grouped undei
a state department of agriculture."
State Agricultural Society Scored.
Mr. Wallace attacked the work oi
the Minnesota Agricultural society
He said:
"The annual meeting of the Min
nesota Agricultural society is reallj
but a political convention in miniature,
the effective result of the educational
Eeatures of the program being practi
cally nullified. This is great misfor
tune, for there is really serious need
of at least one great conference each
year where agriculture is the chief
and only theme for discussion. The
situation has become so acute in the
affairs of the Minnesota Agricultural
society that it is quite possible that
the educational features of the annual
meeting will be entirely divorced from
the ordinary business session, the affil
iated organizations preferring to hold
their meetings in different parts of
the state where they can be free from
the atmosphere of politics which is
always present at the St. Paul and
Minneapolis meetings. Under a state
department of agriculture the state
and county fairs are merely one feat
are of the work of the department.
Constructive Legislation Wanted.
"If you would inquire what is wrong
with the present administrative func
tions of the state in relation to agri
culture, it seems to me that the gen
eral statement would hold true that
there is at the present time a lack of
sufficient constructive legislation for
the protection of agricultural inter
ests," continued Mr. Wallace. "There
(s likewise a lack of direct responsi
bility on the part of the various state
bureaus and commissions, there is a
lack of intelligent information as to
our soil, and a woeful lack of statis
tical information. There is a dupli
cation of work, there is the harmful
effect of a political atmosphere, which
leads to constant scandal, and worst
of all a serious lack of business effi
ciency. Though I do not know that
a state department of agriculture
would straighten out all of these diffi
culties, however, our present method
suggests confusion, whereas a plan of
state department of agriculture pro
vides orderly organizations."
H. R. Smith, professor of animal
husbandry at the agricultural college,
spoke on "Dairying and Live Stock as
a Means of Developing the North
west," at the morning session of the
congress.
"There has never been a time in
the history of the United States when
there has been a greater need for the
development of the live stock industry
than now, and there is no section of
the country where the need is more
urgent than in the Northwest," said
Professor Smith.
"Prices are high on animal products
because there is a scarcity of live
stock," he said. "How could we ex.
pect anything but high prices on beef
in view of the fact that there are
eight per cent less -beef cattle in total
and 21 per cent less beef steers in the
,country today than 10 years ago,
whereas there are 21 per cent mow
people to feed."
Professor Smith said that the farm
ers of Minnesota and other western
states had neglected the raising ot
live stock for the raising of wheat. He
pleaded for a return to the live stock
Industry and showed what could be
gained by such a course. He showed
how Important the raising of live
stock was to the fertility of the soil.
Governor Norris of Montana, who
was to have appeared on the program
Saturday, spoke Friday night instead.
Besides Governor Norris, who spoke
on the subject of "The Great North
west," Miss Margaret Evans, dean of
women at Carleton college, spoke on
"Child Conservation," and Mrs. E. H.
Loyhed, president Minnesota Federa
tion of Woman's clubs, discussed the
work that the club women are doing
In Minnesota. H. Longstreet Taylor
ended the evening session with a dis
cussion o£ what, should be .and .what
can be done In the fight against tuber
"The most effective way to prevent
American emigration to Canada is to
adopt a more liberal policy towards
settlers upon their public lands," said
Governor Norris of Montana in his ad
dress at the Conservation congress
last night.
"With its many and superior ad
vantages the Northwest should speed
ily become thickly populated and fully
developed but the public land policy
ot the government must be changed.
Maude Ballington Booth, noted pris
on worker, spoke on "The Discharged
Prisoner—An Asset." Governor Eb
erhart was also on the program for
one of the closing addresses. The
registration was 4,631 persons.
CANVASSING DONE.
Certifies for First Time the Popular
Choice for United 8tatee
Senator.
St Paul.—Minnesota's vote on
president and on state officers and
congressman has just been officially
declared by the state canvassing
board. Complete tables of the vote
already had been made up from du
plicate returns by direction of Julius
A. Schmahl, secretary of state and
chairman of the board. The orig
inal returns were opened by the
members of the board, checked, and
the results found to be Identical with
the unofficial figures announced at the
capitol last week. Theodore Roose
velt's official plurality in Minnesota
is 19,430, and Governor A. O. Eber
hart led P. M. Ringdal by 30,029.
The Vote on Governor.
The official vote by counties for
governor, as certified today, is as fol
lows:
Aitkin
Anoka
Becker
Beltrami
Benton
Big Stone ...
Blue Earth ..
Brown
Carlton
Carver
Cass
Chippewa ...
Chisago
Clay
Clearwater ..
Cook
Cottonwood ..
Crow Wing
Dakota
Dodge
Douglas
Faribault ..
Fillmore ...
Freeborn
Goodhue ...
Brant
Hennepin ...
Houston
Hubbard ....
Isanti
Itasca
Jackson
Kanabec ...
Kandiyohi ...
Kittson
Koochiching
Lac qui Parle
Lake
Le Sueur ...
Lincoln
Lyon
McLeod
Mahnomen ..
Marshall ...
Martin
Meeker
MlUe Lacs ..
Morrison ...
Mower
Murray
634
508
455
639
644
646
522
1.022
1,228
1,001
600
688
2,070
1,162
734
1,446
829
827
1,213
1,336
87S
132
338
92
238
869
108
70
184
874
389
66
291
83
112
141
173
60
78
725
175
35
92
78
103
187
149
28
235
390
426
144
106
201
858
88
269
87
107
613
229
295
246
29
276
208
250
144
T36
1.229
1,778
926
909
1,399
1,944
1,653
2.179
621
19,669
1,422
637
878
886
1,072
515
1,199
602
624
839
357
1.307
628
940
1,101
181
1,005
1,162
1,413
817
1,340
2,046
066
1,027
1,143
778
1,600
2,183
648
1,099
652
1,762
906
Nicollet
Nobles
Norman
Olmsted
Otter Tail ..
Pennington ..
Pine
Pipestone ...
Polk
Pope ,.
Ramsey
Red Lake ...
Redwood ...
Renville .»•
Rice
Rock
Roseau
|t. Louis ...
Bcott
Sherburne ...
Sibley
235
189
362
198
244
183
430
172
812
180
184
231
623
318
107
35
290
277
453
285
271
370
447
416
758
288
2,059
1,314
641
932
404
809
429
764
169
66
471
653
1,510
464
476
817
827
992
1,678
284
1,105
676
807
613
808
323
8,064
127
134
483
88
204
136
720
211
54
523
118
163
178
327
134
23
642
239
218
228
113
277
192
201
188
535
247
936
296
228
106
1,063
679
771
48
185
392
437
201
194
1,568
96
187
112
298
256
198
496
341
92
122
119
273
218
244
135
127
460
488
12,428
711
459
242
727
896
233
896
423
453
660
203
1,538
473
1,038
1,215
247
746
1,321
995
394
1,494
1,009
685
884
940
482
1.404
1,845
437
866
438
1,657
290
6460
37
233
830
637
61
267
140
61
612
70
433
138
96
122
50
87
175
89
62
297
232
135
62
84
111
213
71
496
322
293
101
689
33
2,556
45
144
86
127
61
390
2,517
38
70
68
200
63
33
78
428
19
43
148
68
174
33
41
213
130
71
4,887
800
120
156
237
209
111
275
219
101
884
64
301
199
299
193
37
347
327
449
143
288
360
201
187
337
165
436
762
114
311
182
400
203
3,245
65
351
384
474
150
153
2,111
118
214
298
600
251
160
210
321
169
351
136
215
573
202
183
445
555
308
14,592111,012
302
1,276
1,718
1,900
768
765
6,706
837
663
1,137
1,759
1,148
601
851
1,450
483
1,261
519
1,110
1,989
865
636
2,236
1,737
764
423
i,040
1,180
1.496
170
311
6,707
1,049
326
793
3,137
1,364
522
867
1,053
441
1,482
303
922
1,109
623
449
2,790
1,219
iwifte
teams
teel
tevens
odd
Iraverse ....
Wabasba ...
Wadena
Waseca
Washington
Watonwan ..
Wilkin
Winona
Wright
fel'w Medicine
Totals ..,
129,688
99,659)25,769
29,876133,408
Atwater Republican Press.
P. A. Peterson has left George
Potter's at Cosmos and has become
a Willmarite. He is taking care of
one of the best hotels at Willmar.
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Feig enter
tained a large party of relatives on
Thanksgiving day, among them Coun
ty Auditor Feig and family of Will
mar.
Ernest Wilson returned Sunday
night from his trip to the cities. He
represented the Gennesse Local Un
ion as a delegate to the American
Society of Equity meeting held in St.
Paul the 19th and 20th.
Invitations have been issued by
Mr. and Mrs. N. P. Freeman for the
wedding of their daughter, Minnie, to
Mr. George Engwall, which takes
place at the family residence in At
water on Wednesday afternoon, Dec.
11, at 2:30 o'clock.
Theodore Olson, who has been em
ployed during the past summer in
Harrison, departed yesterday morn
ing for his old home at Sveen, Sund
hordlaud, Norway, where he will en
joy the holidays with his .parents.
He expects to be gone until next
summer.
ii ii ii ii ii ii ii ii ii ii ii ii ii ii ii
Wm
,tr£CCMBER4,1112
Copyright Hart Sohaflaer & Marx
G. A. Glader has sold his residence ELI E. NELSON C0R{
property in the village to D. P. Sene
chal, who expects to retire from
farming and become an Atwater
resident next spring The consider
ation was $3,500, the property sold
including an acre of land besides the
buildings. Mr. Glader retains the
other acre and will probably erect
another residence the coming year.
A deal was made last week by
which Andrew Larson became the
owner of the John Peterson farm in
Kandiyohi township. We understand
that $80 per acre was the price paid.
Mr. Peterson will dispose of his pro
perty at an auction sale Dec. 5.
Miss Anna Edlund of Dassel, who
visited her sister, Mrs. J. W. Ostland
over Thanksgiving went to Murdock
Friday for a visit before returning io
her home.
Mrs. Christ Rasmusson and little
daughter returned home Saturday
from a short visit with Kandiyohi
relatives.
Cut Price Sale oi Edison Recordsj
Beginning Wed. Nov. 20th, we will close out
our entire stock of Two and Four inute Edi
son wax cylinders Records at less than cost.
These records sell regularly at 35c and 50c
each. At this Sale 21c and 31c each. A big
saving. Come whileiheselection is complete.
4000 records in stockfc As the Edison Co. will
not make any more two minute records this
will be your last chance to get them.
The new Blue Amberol Edison Record now here
NELSON MUSIC CO. ?UEBZS™
Gold Handled Umbrellas........ ___$3 ft) $ 7 0 0
Smoking Jackets and Bath Robes. $ 5 O $ 1 0 0 0
Sealskin Caps $ 2 tO $ 9 0 0
Gloves and Mittens, muskrat lined and fur mittens__$2 lO $ 4 5 0
Silk Shirts, with collar to match —$2 10 $ 3 0 0
Many new kinds of Silk Mufflers and Reefers $ 1 10 $ 2 5 0
Combination sets of Ties, Socks and Mufflers.. $ 1 lO $ 2 0 0
Silk and Initial Handkerchiefs 15 tO $ 1 0 0
Watch Fobs, Cuff Buttons, Scarf Pins.... 2 5 tO $ 2 0 0
Do your Christmas shopping early, you will thereby get a
better selection and get better service.
$ & &
OVERCOATS
We have overcoats in 48, 50,
52 and 56 inch lengths. In fine
blacks, with velvet and con
vertible collars.
Browns, Tans, Greys. In ker
seys, meltons and chinchillas.
Belts all the way round, belts
one-half way around and plain
backs.
Just now we are getting ready to show you all kinds of suitable Christmas
gifts for men and boys.
The Store from Which Gifts Come Men Appreciate
SHREDDER VICTIM
Left Hand Crushed to Wrist and
Skin Stripped Off. Accident
Occurred Nov. 23.
Litchfield Saturday Review: Eli E.
Nelson, resident on what is best
known as the Hershey farm near
Lake Minnebelle, was the victim of
the deadly corn shredder Saturday
evening of last week.
The accident took place on the
farm of his brother, S. W. Nelson,
east of Minnebelle. The left hand
was caught in the rolls of the shred
der and badly crushed to the wrist.
The skin was caught and stripped oil
the larger part of the hand. The
muscles of the hand were so badly
crushed that circulation of the blood
in the injured member interfered
with, and while efforts were made to
save the hand they proved unsuccess
ful on that account. This is the sec
ond hand that .has been sacrificed to
the corn shredder in this county
within the past two weeks, the other
haying been that of Henry Danielson
of Cedar Mills. Eli E. Nelson is a
son of N. R. Nelson, prominent and
well known Greenleaf farmer. The
amputation of the hand was made
Wednesday.
Eli E. Nelson, who had his hand
so badly crushed in a corn shredder
accident Saturday, last, that it was
necessary to amputate the member,
was very sick yesterday and some
fears were entertained for a time for
his recovery. The heart was refusing
to do its work normally. He wis
very sick Wednesday, but rallied
Thursday.
Prof, and Mrs. C. A. Peterson- and
baby returned Saturday from Ben
son, where they spent Thanksgiving
I relatives.
t#v:
Go where you like you will never see better
clothes than these suits and overcoats we have
ready here to show you.
We can fit the tall men, the short men, the stout
tall men, and the stout short men, and men of all
shapes*
-*^-*tf&3£J
satisfaction is uppermost
everywhere in this store. That's
our idea of service, to fit you
perfectly, mind and body, to give
you real service.
Yt\VUAM N\\NN.
Sale and Lunch.
The Bethany society .of, the Luth
eran Free church will have a sale on
fancy articles and home-made can
dies on Friday evening. Dec. 13 com
mencing at 7:30. A program will be
rendered and sandwiches, cake and
coffee will be served for 10 cents.
Everybody welcome:
To those who have enjoyed the
pleasure of an old-fashioned country
barn dance, the dance of Jack Cas
sin, Seth Sowders and the Buster
Brown Ponies will be like the breath
of new mown hay. This charming
rural feature is as full of snap and
quaimness as summer vacation of
youthful days, and will breeze across
the footlights of the Opera House,
FrJday, Dec. 6.
Miss Elizabeth Wolf returned to
Mineapolis Monday, after a several
weeks'- stay in this city, doing priv
ate nursing and also visiting her
friend, Miss Anna Schollin. ,S'
A. B. XICIft Jr C. B. UBM,
President Vtee-Pw*.
SUITS
In two button style coats
with long lapels and high cut
vests.
And belted back norfolks for
young men.
And three button styles with
body fitting backs and natural
shoulders for the middle aged
men.
Granite May Go Dry.
Granite Falls Journal: The ques
tion of license or no license will pro
bably come before the voters of Gran
ite Falls again at the January elec
tion, and if it does it is our predic
tion that no license will win. There
is a big undercurrent against li
cense.
WILLMAR TANNERY
Manj robes now on hand for sale.
Black and Brown horse hide robes.
A nice lot of 100 tanned dor
•kins. Some of these are made
up Into robes. Anyone wishing* to
buy tanned dog skins should oeA
soon before they are all made up.
Wo reline and repair old robes.
Bring- them in.
Pur mittens for sole.
Important Votioe—AH skins for
tannins' should bo salted at oaoe
after- skinning- to keep thorn'from
spoiling-.
ANDREW O. SATBCR
tS7 First St. Wlllmar,
We believe that our 30 years of
business among you (the people of Kandiyohi
County) warrants in claiming that we can offer you an abso
lutely safe storehouse for your money. Checks on us are
accepted in payment of bills at par in any part of Minnesota.
Ninety per cent of the successful business men are Bank
Depositors. What better time than now to open a Check
Account with us? We have unexcelled facilities for trans
acting all branches of banking. ,: V*".*"*
Our Officers will be glad to extend to you every courtesy
consistent with sound banking. We will keep your valuables
in our fire-proof vault free of charge. We shall be pleased
to have yon call on us.::'^v:-^«:sf*M^
BANKCOEI WILLMAR
••HM«i UodWdod Profits. $120,000.06
JP. O. HANDY.
Cashier 'M:
if^ffi.
f*^
V2V
KM
.3*
N. S: SWBNSON,
:%3S Ass't CaeMer

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