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New Ulm review. (New Ulm, Brown County, Minn.) 1892-1961, February 18, 1903, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89081128/1903-02-18/ed-1/seq-1/

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If you are off for a "little journey
in the world"—a quirt unostentatious
affair—no rice, here's everything nice
at the rijjh' price, to help give you
an easy self possessed appearance.
Men's Spring Suits $10, $12, $13, $15
Fine Hand Tailored Suits, ready for
service—$15 to $30.
Walk Over shoes,
$3 50 and $4.
Commission Merchants.
WE BUY.*
Poultry,
Calves,
Eggs,
Hides,
Etc.
Hummel Brothers,
Clothes for man and boy.
14 N. Minn. St. New Ulm, Minn.
StorkBros.
Come and be satisfied.
Cor. German & 1st S. St. Phone 186
MARKET REPORT.
WheatNo. 1 new 69
No. 8 new 67
No. 3 new 65
Corn, per bushel 30
Oats, 25
Barley, 40
Rye, 40
Flax, 1.05
Potatoes, 25
Onions, 50
Beans, white navy, per bushel 2.50
Eggs, per dozen .20
Butter, per pound 15 to .30
Hogs, live, per hundred.. .$5.00 to 5.50
Cows,
Steers,
Sheep,
Veal Calves,««
Beef Hides,
Hard Coal, per to
Soft
Hard Wood, per cqrd..
Soft
Hay, per ton
2.75 to 3.00
3 00 to 3.50
3 00 to 4.25
4.Q0 to 4 25
07*
10.50
6.00
7.00
4 50
7,00
$5.00 to
My Hair
I had a very severe sickness
that took off all my hair. I purr
chased a bottle or Aycr's Hair
Vigor and it brought all my hair
back again."
W. D. Quinn, Marseilles, III.
One thing is certain,—
Ayer's Hair Vigor makes
the hair grow. This is
because it is a hair food.
It feeds the hair and the
hair grows, that's all there
is to it. It stops falling
of the hair, too, and al
ways restores color to
gray hair.
SJ.OO a bottle. All dragftete:
If your druggist cannot supply you,
send us one dollar and ire wiU express
yon a bottle. Be sure and give the name
of your nearest express o&ce. Address,
J. C. AYER CO.. Lowell, Mass.
Kodol Dyspepsia Cure
Digests what you eat.
Extend Benefit of Pension Laws.
Representitive S. D. Peterson last
week left with the Review a copy of the
bill recently introduced in the house of
representatives by Hon. J. T. McCleary,
eif^Hdt^.^h^^eaii&tS'oftfhe^pensott-hiws.
to the survivors of the men who took
part in repelling the Indians at the time
of the outbreak. The hill is as follows:
A bill to extend the United States pen
sion laws to participants in the Sioux
Indian war of eighteeu hundred and six
ty-two.
Be it enacted by the Senate and House
of Representatives of the United Statt-s
of America in Congress assembled,
That the benefits'of the United States
pension laws be extended to those citi
zens of the State of Minnesota who act*
ually participated in military operations
of the Sioux Indian war ot eighteen
hundred and sixty-two in said State, and
to their surviving widows and orphans
This is the result of the work that Mr.
Peterson did in the state legislature at
the last session when he secured the
passage of a memorial to the congrecs
men and senators requesting the passage
of such a measure. He has the assurance
of the eutirt: Minnesota delegation that
when the bill comes up they will all
work for its passage, and the assurance
is good that in the near future all worthy
participants in the outbreak will be able
to secure relief as volunteer soldiers of
the United States, tbough what they get
under the pension laws will be meager
enough. .-*\-V'
..$£ Current Hews Club.
The Current News Club met with Mrs.
Reim and held its meeting. Fifteen
members responded to roll call with Quo
tations. After the minutes of the pro
ceeding meeting were read and approved.
The following programe on "Russia" was
carried out with Mrs. Strickleras leader.
1 Paper Mrs. Reim
2 Government Mrs. Zelle
3 Things of interest in Russia Jtfra.
Vogel, v~
^t
ir--
4 Vocal Solo.. Miss Friton
5 Song America By Club
6 Book Review Mrs. Buessmann
7^ IjVocal Solo Mrs. Krook
After a business session the Club ad
journed to meet with Mrs. Rieneke Feb.
24 .:f\ry^2v$^ EMMA FRITON, Sec'j,
ivi
.' »*afcsaS,\*'i.#' s'
Henr Heimerdinger expects to leave
this week for points in Washington
state to again look up a location to re
enter the milling business. This time
he has his eye on Walla Walla, and
thinks that is the mecca he is seeking.
He has an opportunity of securing two
mills in that city, and thinks he can ac
complish more in the milling lime in
that city than this state, if he gets such
a monopoly of the business. He also is
anxious to get into a milder climate than
this. His family will -remain in this
city for the present.
Printing. ~-.
Decorating. ....
Floats-— ~-~.
Bands 4cOrchestras '.....
Postal Cards
Indian Buttons
Sioux Indians
Second Rejc't iH.N. G
Burg's Battery ».
Defenders Badges
Herman Height Picnic
Lodging & Meals
Livery
Speakers
Labor etc.- __.,
Cash on hand
VOLUME XXV N EWULM,BRO¥N COUNTY,-MINN., WEDNESDAY, FEB 1,8. 1903. NO.
CELEBRATION COM. REPORTS
S the the Commercial Unio
that Its Efforts re
Rewarded.
BALANCE ON A N
$ 1 0 3 7
W&^
Commercial Union Holds Interest
., ing and Importing 1
.3*
-'The New Ulm Commercial Unioriheld
a meeting Friday nieht which has been
one of the best that has been held for
some time as the report will show. The
meeting was called to order by the presi
dent and the usual forni*f opening was
gone through after which the chairman
of the Massacre Celebiation committee
read the finished report of the committee,
which showed that the total amount of
funds handled was $3083.36 and that
after paying all the bills there remained
to the credit of the committee $101.37.
This is something that was entirely un
looked for and is gratifying to the Com.
mercial Union and a compliment to the
committee. The items enumerate.! in
the report given below show that there
was some very effective work c'one on
the part or the committee, especially in
the gross receipts raised through the per
sonal effort of the committee outside of
the contributions. The Minstrer show
which was the starter for the fund was a
good one and gave the committee the
necessary endorsement from the people.
In ail tins task of raising the mouey,
handling such a* large sum and satisfy
ing everybody the committee has been
entirely successful, and after submitting
the report the Commercial Union gave
the members of the committee a vote of
thanks for the efficient manner in which
they had conducted the business.
REPORT OF COMMITTEE.
.$284 15
40
144 91
46760
127
62 85
.. 167 65
608 22
100
17816
385 10
35
7 45
10137
$3083 86
Total :."
After disposing'of the report the ques
tion was raised as to the manner of dis
posing of the surplus and the committee
reported that it was the intention of all
the members in turning it into the
treasury of the organization to have it
applied as a fund for the use of a park
board which it was expected that the
city council would create. With this end
in vitw a committee composed of Alfred
Vogel, Otto Schell, F. Crone and B. Juni
was appointed to appear before the city
council andv request the creation of a
park commission, whose duty it will be
to look after the park property of the
city and see to the proper beautifying of
the city in that respect. J|£
The committee on legislation having
several matters to report handed the
secretary the written result of its work
and reported favorable on the proposition
of the Minneapolis Commercial Club to
apply to the state legislature for an in
creased appropriation, for the purpose of
fostering the propogation of fish in the
streams of the state. A very satisfactory
aud necessiry measure.
Two other bills were acted upon, one
relative to the revision of many of the
laws governing the territory of Alaska,
sent by the chamber of commerce of
Skagway and one looking to therevision
of certain portions of the interstate com
merce laws, both of which were recom
mended as godb" bills and a lesolution
favoring their passage was carried. One
bill relative to the restriction of immi
gration the committee took no action on
because as the chairman stated he thought
the matter would regulate it self.
It was expected at this meeting that
something would be done relative to the
Union taking some action in the matter
of passing a resolution or something to
that effect in regard to endorsing^the
action of L. Q, Vogel in the matter he
has in. charge relative to the investi
gation of the affaiis of the city. Some-
*&
thing of this kind had been noised about
the city in the afternoon and it evident
ly called out several of the city fathers
who have not been in the habit of at
tending the meetings of the Union, but
they were all disappointed for no such a
resolution was presented and no reference
made to the matter. "•swyaw
&v
,**• Meeting. 4
&
CASH RAISED THE COM.
Minstrel Show £$, $ 921 00
Sale of Buttons .. 24« 20
Postal Cards si. 146 75
Sale of Badges ~~~... 25* 2&
-Sioux£odian Show 353 40
Herman Height Picnic 629 96
War Graph Show. 32 10
Sweet Oir Co. for music 10
Decoration Sold.™ 2
$1894 65
GENERAx\tJBSCilPTION FUND.
City of New Ulm.....v 600
Individual subscription list. 647
Bal. of 4thJuly Celeb. Com. of1901 42 21
Total gross receipts
DISATJRSBHENTS.
$9063 86
""•ft
Class Reading.
Pupils of Miss Schoch Give Exhibition of
K^ 'S: *.v Their Talent.-?"*^-
grV-iit ..- ^.pfi£$F£
r.^Tbe lecture room at Tuiner Hall was
taxed to its utmost capacity on Friday
evening to accommodate the people who
came out to enjoy the public recital giv
en by the pupils of Mists Shocb. ^JL
The room was tastily decorated as
befitted an occasion of the kind. The
The moDOtonmy of the walls was broken
by gay bunting artictically arranged
while in front two huge palms were so
placed on either side of the raised plat
form as to give a gennine stage effect.
Dainty screens concealed a comer where
the pupils awaited their parts.
The program was opened by MisS'Elsie
Koch with reading from Richard Hard
ing Davis, entitled "Scotch Coolie." The
story of a lost dog does not ordinarily
present a theme for much enthusiasm
and great credit is due to Miss Koch for
her careful rendition. "Fourteen Ninety-
W was a selection well suited to '"John
ieM Peterson, and he gave it in a very
delightful way. Ada Neumann followed
with the story of "How Jimmy Tended
the Baby." Jimmy's idea of babies and
the novel way of letting his baby brother
amuse himself with a shoe blacking out
fit, while his parents were away, was very
amusing and took well. ''Eugene Arams
Dream," from Bulwer Lytton, was well
handled by Miss Viola Schell. Dreams
are sometimes most terrible in their seem
ing reality and this, the dream of murder,
aparoacher the horrible. Miss Schell re
cited with a seemingly good understand
iag'of the situation.'
At this point in the program Miss Ida
McCabe of 8t. Peter, rendered Franz
Liszt'a "Polonaire" in a very charming
way and generously responded to a
hearty encore, playing "Annie Laurie"
with orginal variations. The "fall out11
of Betsy and Fritz,a german dialect se
lection was then given in a very excel
lent manner by Miss Violet Gray.
"Jim Bludso" from the writings of
John Hay was next given by Edward
Larson in very excellent form. ''r:,h-£\
Miss Schocn, for her own -part, cnose
"Mother Goose," a story ot the downfall
of a mother through rum and the drama
tic meeting with her daughter, who has
become a Princess Donna. Miss Schoch
was given hearty applause and she re
sponded with a negro dialect selection
whicM was well received. Elizabeth
Schmidt next pleased the audience so
much with her quaint little story of an
arm chair that she was given a generous
recall, to which she responded in a happy
way. The whistling solo given by John
Peterson, with piano accompaniment by
Mrs. Bingham, was well received. Ed
gar Zelle then told of the tcooting"» of
Larrie O'Dee. It was a case of Irish
courtship in which a pig played the star
part the audience was very well pleased
with the story and the speaker. "For
the Chief* Daughter** was a selection
dealing with the tragedy of an Indian
iove affair and well rendered by Miss
Loida Buessmann. The final number,
"A Man after Her own Heart," in the
form of a monologue, was given by Miss
Alma Heimerdinger. The climax of the
story is in the fact that the "man" proves
to be a pick pocket.
As a whole the program was thorough
ly enioyabie and great credit is due
Miss Schoch for her work, while the
pupils themselves are to be congratu
lated upon the very excellent showing
they made.^'
.On Wednesday, Feb 4th. Mrs. Delight
Tiittle, of Town Home, mother of F. A.
Tttttle, celebrated her 90th birthday. She
is enjoying good health and was the re
cipent of many congratulations from
friends and neighbors. Mrs. Tuttle came
to this section of Minnesota in 1855* and
was one of the residents of Brown coun
ty during the Indian massacre in. 1862
and escaped by going to New Ulm. One
of her sons was killed by the Indians
during those terrible times. Her other
children living are Mrs. S. A. George
and Mrs. Henry Benke of New Ulm and
Mrs. L. C. Ives of Stark. Mrs. Tattle's
husband died about 12 years ago.
The Pioneer"drug store has four show
cases for sale at a-bargain.
A*'
'•f.V
E BROS
F. H. E N E
OCH S BROS
BUR CIGAR CO.
J. H. FORSTER
W G. A W I N
FiMTL WlCHERSKI
:T
SPECIAL SALE
Mtt. 1903,
$hi &
Not a fc&s£ of old, shelf-worn and"pS
picked
over stock, but goods fresh from the factory,
every piece. The manufacturer sent us two
lots instead of one and now he has made us
a price that enables us to sell
PERCALES
worth 10c per yd., 34 in. wide, at 6c per yd.
worth
I212c
^NDQINQHAMS
worth 7 cts per yard atitfcfcsi per yard.
This is the second of a series of sales to be
held at our store every Tuesday. Remem
ber the day and don't miss it once as we
mean to make things lively. Come early
and get,first choice.
One ticket for every 20c purchase. Contest closes Sept.
5th at 1 p. m. Ballot box at Crone's store.
j^V Tickets may be had at the following places^f business:
CBON E BROS F. H. RETZLAF OCH S & A E J. F. NEUMAN N
C. G. REIM DIETZ & A A N N
•wS?*
per yd., 36 in. wide, at 7c per yd.
:T
Shredded Cocoanut 16c per lb.
~vV
Here are a few grocery specials to brighten things up.
iFine dried Apricots 10c per lb.
IfExtra large fancy Peaches 10c per lb.
s&
Dyer Bros. Piano Contest!
THEO. MUELLER E N E & Co.'
ARNOLD & FRTTSCHE HUMMEL BROS.
FRK. SCHNOBERICH
W E N E E A BAKER
fWtt DURBAHN
ROBT. FESENMAIER
4
OnOMEYER'S
%*x&*
Next Monday and Tuesday,
Feb. 23rd and 24th.
m^^^mA^S^&^t^n^c^
O. M. OLSEN
EUG. A. PFEFFERLR
SARAH PFEFFERLE.^
'JOHN HENLE
\ftf!
V?V 'r"%~\
Safe &?&••
jFieece Lined Dress-goods^iN
In order to close out our broken pieces of fleece lined goods we will
offer them at 7 cts per yard. ^These goods are worth 10 and 15 cts and
some of it is 36 inches wide and fast colors. Here is an opportunity for a
gopd dress at half the regular price.
g-V
iQo to our large line of spring and summer woolen
ITe would call attention to our large uu of spring an a
dress-goods as well as our big line of work goods, also white goods. From
5c a yard up to $1.88 per yard. We have all the latest styles, call at our
store, we shall be pleased to show you the different lines of goods. i.
Bemember we give tickets on the Wesley Piano. Ours is
the only Dry Goods store where you can get the blue votes,
so buy your dry goods here and help*your society, or church
to win the $400 piano free. ,*-' ,. I
,tTlTTMM»TMMMTtTTTTMT^TMTH*» TTMTTTTTHHHT»
7&i>
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