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New Ulm review. (New Ulm, Brown County, Minn.) 1892-1961, January 13, 1904, Image 2

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fUw Uim Review
Wednesday, Jan. 13th, 1904.
C. & N W R. R.
DEPARTURE OF TRAINS EAST.
a No. 504 (Sx.Sun. line 4:00 a
No. 18 (Bx.Sun.) old line, 5:45 a
1)R.
No 502 (Daily) line 3:55
No 23 (Daily) old line 3:56 na
No. 2 E Sun.) line 6:5o
DEPARTURE DETRAINS \*EST.
No 5 fEx. Sun.) line 7.52
No 17 Daily! old line, 1:00
No 508 (Daily) line, 1:«»8 a
No 21 E Sun.) old line, 8:40p
N 5 E S 11.15
No 501 (Daily) line, 12-38 a
a in Nos.501 a 503 a in a
a a to a Chicag a a
~ars between a a to a Minneapolis.
Dinin cars VViuona a a
a a a to a Minneapolis
a in Nos.804 a 501 a sleeping a
between Minneapoli a Redfield, S.
information in re of Jj.
Beecher, A
A C. so W is
Gen. Ag't W in a G. A. a
M. & ST. L. R. R.
Corrected to a 5th, 1904.
N
I S
5-59 am 1 Minneapalis&St a *12:28
*l:50prnf a 8:54
I S O a from W in I *8:30am
Dail except S a
N a of a N a
St. a a Minneapolis
Close connections for Chicago.St.room's
a a all points E a a S
R. E is Agent.
R. G. F. REINEKE, M. D.
SPECIALIST,
EYE, EAR, NOSE AND THROAT.
Office Ottomeyer Block. Hours 10 to 12
and 1 to 5.
NEW ULM, MINN.
R. J. H. VOGEL,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
Office over Alwie's Drug Store.
Residence on Broadway.
Residence Phou.« 179. Office Phone 188
NEW ULM, MINN
0. C. STRICKLER,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
Office over Alwiu's City Drug Stoie.
Residence cor. Broadway & 2d N. St.
Is E\\ ULM, MINN
EDMUND W. BA.YLEY,
PHYSICIAN & SURGEON.
Office Hours: 12 M. to 4 P. M. and 7 to
9 P. M.
Office over Olsea's Drug Store.
Tel. 184. New Ulm, Minn
ITOIDALE & SOMSEN,
ATTORNEYS & COUN
SELORS.
Practices in all State and U. 3. courts.
Particulai attention given to collec
tions. Office over post-office.
New ULM, MINN.
A LBERT PFAEtfDER,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Ottomeyer Block.
NEW ULM, MINN.
0
1 A. HAGBERG.
ATTORNEY A COUNSELOR.
Office in Masoni Block—2d Floor.
a ad rice given a it tried in all
a Collections a to
NEW ULM, MINN.
0
1 A. HEER3.
ARCHITECT AND BUILDER.
N S AND SPECIFICATIONS FURBISHED
a a on all in ot Build
in Office on S a Street
NEW ULM, MINN.
R. L. A. GEBHARDT,
Office in the Ottomeyer Block.
NBW ULM, MINN.
FRED W. FRITSOHE,
DENTAL SURGEON
Oduntunde for Extracting
©fflce ever Brown Co. Bask
$ffv» ULM,
IKT-
P&
MINN.
DR. GEO. R. KOCH,
DENTAL SURGEON.
OFFICE IN THB POBTQFKCE BLOCK.
NEW ULM, MINN.
At Hanska the 8d and 4th Thursdays
©f each month.
Your
Liver
Is it acting well? Bowels
regular? Digestion good? If
not, remember Ayer's Pills.
The kind you have known all
yOUr J.C.AyerCo.,Lowell, Massi
(WantHie.,r
you moustache or beard
a beautiful brown or rich black? Use
BUCKINGHAM'S DYE
BjPgTtCIS OP DBPOUISTS OB HALL CO NASHUA, H. H.
50 DOLLA ASSESSMENT
Members of Farmers MutualTelephone
Company Assess Themselves.
mt
The annual meeting of the Minnesota
Valley Farmers' Mutual Telephone
company was held at Lake Crystal
Monday, and was attended by sixty
or seventy of the members. Daniel
Williams of South Bend was reelected
president, J. H. Doty of Courtland
first vice president, James D. Price of
Cambria second vice president, David
Crane of South Bend trustee for one
year, Robt. S. Hughes and Elliot
Upson of Lake Crystal trustee for two
years, and David E. Bowen of Cam
bria and Wm. S. Hughes of Butternut
Valley trustees for three years.
The accounts of the company were
referred to a committee consisting of
Messrs. Bowen, Doty and Upson to
audit.
An assessment of $50 a member was
levied to pay the indebtedness of $600.
It was also voted to ehange from a
mutual to a stock company if sufficient
stock can be subscribed, and com
mittees were appointed to do the
soliciting.
"Wm. Buchholtz of the Northwestern
and C. K. Willard of the Citizens' tele
phone company were present by invita
tion to explain the cost of construc
tion, which they did. The company
has a good line built, amounting to
over one hundred miles.
Good Showing for 1903.
The annual meeting of the Lafayette
& Bernadotte creamery company was
held at the school house in Dist. No.
43, on January 9th, 1904.
The annual report of Secretary C.
A. Swanson was read and adopted as
follow:
Total No. lbs. milk received. .4,423,835
butter made 193,362
Average test 0382
Average yield 4.3T
RECEIPTS.
Butter and butter milk, etc.,
sold to patrons and deduct
ed on checks $5,127.22
Cash sales 38,232.26
Total receipts $43,359.52
DISBURSEMENTS.
Paid by butter and produce $ 5,134.42
Cash by checks .. 30,889.21
Total paid for milk 36,032.63
Butter maker's wages 1,063 98
Skimming station's "wages 1,105,00
Secretary's wages 199.00
Treasurer's wages 55.00
Hauling butter and supplies 125.19
Coal 1,796.64
Supplies 2,214.03
Repairs paid out of skng f'd 539.39
Total $43,130.86
Balance ahead for year $ 228.66
WHAT IN A NAME?
Everything is in the name when it
oomes to Witch Hazel Salve. E C. De
Witt & Co. of Chicago discovered some
years ago how to make a salve fiom
Witch Hazel that is a speci6c for Piles.
For blind, bleeding, itching and pro
truding Pilrfs, eczema, cuts, burns,
bruises and all skin diseases DeWitt't*
Salve has no equal. This has given rise
to numerous worthies* counterfeits. AsU
for DeWitt's—the genuine. Sold by all
druggists.
WORLD'S FAIR NEWS NOTES.
Indiana's poultry exhibit at the
World's Fair will consistof 1,000birds.
The Chinese pavilion at the fair is
receiving the staff decorations and
other ornamental work. The big
dragons on the north facade present a
startling and striking appearance.
A Dayton, O., car company will ex
hibit at the "World's Fair two hand
some railroad coaches, all of the
timbers and finishing lumber of which
were made from catalpa trees grown
on a farm near Dublin, Ind.
Work on the Festival Hall, the last
of the important exposition buildings,
is progressing with, great speed.
Weather conditions have been such
that the contractors have lost but little
time.
A company of Milwaukee men have
organized and applied for a concession
to install fountains in various parts
of the World's Fair grounds and sell
mineral waters, ice cold, at a penny a
glass. The exposition management has
installed many drinking fountains and
filtered river water will be supplied
free.
No REASONABLE MAN
imagines that a neglected cold can be
cured in a day. The uncountable air~
cells in the lungs are inflamed and the
throat is as tender as an open sore. But
time and Allen's Lung Balsm will over
come the cold and staveofE consumption.
The cough will cease and the lungs will
be sound as anew dollar. All druggists
sell Allen's Lung Balsm.
Real Estate Transfers.
Wm. Pfaender to Anna Ambrosch,
10, 8, N New Ulm, $15.
Conrad Genecke to Hans Rickers,
1, 175, NNew Ulm, $150.
Emil Wicherski to Gustav Dahms,
2, 184, N New Ulm, $100.
Sebastian Wagner to Ferdinand
Marks, 160 acres, S 23, and 80 acres,
S 22, 109, 34, $9,240.
Chas. Stuebe to Gabriel Gebhardt,
80 acres, S 4, and 80 acres, S 9, T110,
31, $7,200. *_,
1 A Splendid Song. ?£,=•
"Lights of Home" is the title of this
years best story a a is founded
on, and a feature in Lottie Blair Par
ker's latest play of the same title.
Al Trahern, the composer and pub
lisher has sent copies to all music
dealers, so that those interested may
hare no^rouble in securing it. *,-,
MINNESOTA NEWS.
Died From Eating: Shot.
His intestines perforated several hun
dred times by shot that he hadb. swal
lowed when eating wild game that had
fallen to his gun, Chris Larson of Mc
Intos died in the Bethesda hospital
at Crookston, while his medical attend
ants were ignorant of the nature of his
aliment. «j. jfyM^EgS
A post m&rtem examination revealed,
the astonishing condition of the man,
a condition such as never has been no
ted before modern surfferv. ^SsaliyiE
Larson owned an eighty-acre farm
near Mcintosh. He was extremely ec
centric and refused to sleep anywhere
but on a heap of straw in a stable, with
his horses and cattle—never having
any more adequate covering than an
old binder canvas.
His diet consited mainly of wild
game, such as rabbits, prairie chickens,
ducks and geese, supplemented with
additions of vegetables as he was able
to raise on the farm. Altho eccentric,
he was thrifty and managed to work
his land tg a good advantage.
v-
Unusual Fatality
Arthur Proehl, the nine-year-old son
of Mrs. Elizabeth Proehl, who resides
with her father, Henry Beneke, in
Rich "Valley, near Glencoe, was killed
in a peculiar manner.
The little fellow went to the hen
house to gather some eggs, and had to
climb up to reach the upper tier of the
nests.
His* weight on the tier pulled it over
and it fell, carrying the boy with it,
pinning him down on the floor in the
corner of the coop in such a manner
that his mouth and nose were forced
into the hollow of his left arm, which
had become doubled under his face as
he fell.
The weight of the box was so great
that the boy was unable to move it and
he was suffocated, being dead when
found ten minutes later by his uncle,
John Beneke.
Cost of Corn.
The results for 1903 bf the statistical
investigations at Northfield, Marshall
and Halstad, which are being carried
on by the state experiment station and
by the statistical bureau of the United
States department of agriculture, are
being' summarized. These investiga
tions were undertaken to secure facts
for the use of all the farmers of the
state as to the cost, returns and pro
fits of each line of business on the farm.
It was found that the cost of grow
ing an acre of field corn, including cut
ting, shocking and shredding, was
$14.83 The cost each acre when husk
ing on the hill was 311.81.
Some of the factors used, as 15 cents
an hour for man labor and 73^ cents an
hour for horse labor, have not been
finally settled upon, hence the footings
may be changed before Tihe facts are
finally published.
a of Regents.
Judge Greenleaf Clark of Si. Paul
was reappointed member of the board
of regents of the state university by
Gov. S. B, Van Sant and E. W. Randall
of Hamline, secretary of the Minnesota
Agricultural society, was named to
succeed Theodore L. Schurmeier of St
Paul. The term of office is six years,
beginning Jan. 1, 1904.
A delegate of citizens from Hamline
appeared before the governor to urge
the appointment of Mr. Bandall They
emphasized his business ability and
sound judgment as evidenced by his
work in connection with the manage
ment of the state fair.
State Treasury.
The December receipts at the state
treasury aggregated $660,745.94. The
principal items were: State taxes, $238,
711.87 state institutions, $156,170.61
telephone taxas, $33,209.97 redemption
of funding banks, $25,000 interest on
bonds, $32,787.50 grain inspection,
$48,234.78 stumpage, $29,263.36 school
lands, $32,811.92 interest on school
lands, $17,580.84 hunters'licenses, $11,
838.85.
Bail Ma a
£on Davis, a giant lumberjack, with
an. alleged record as a barroom fighter,
lost an eye in W. G. Carlin's saloon at
Eloorwood a few weeks ago, and later
he returned to that vilfcage. with a 38
caliber revolver to get satisfaction. He
now lies mortality wounded in the jail
at Floorwood.
Long Service.
Judge F. M. Crosby of Hastings has
been in judicial service longer than any
judge in Minnesota. This year he en
tered upon his thirty-third year on the
district bench, a record not only re
markable but unequaled. His present
t»rm will not expire until Janu
ary, 1909. Judge Crosby is regarded
as one of the best judges of the state,
and has a unblemished record.
News in Brief.
The coal sheds of the Northwestern
railroad at Tracy were destroyed by
fire.
The Arlington hotel at Brainerd
was damaged by fire to the amount
of $50,000. «S"
Steele county land owners are agi
tating drainage ditch propositions of
much importance.
Ancient Landmark lodge, A. F. and
A. M., will celebrate its fiftieth annl?
versary at St. Paul. & a
The knitting and top-setting depart*
ments of the knitting mill at Mankato
were closed on account of a strike of
100 operatives, who are mostly girls.
The strike was caused by a temporary
reduction of 10 per cent in the wages.
Armando Martinucci, employed as a
bartender in a saloon in St. Paul, tried
to start a fire with gasoline. He was
badly burned.
Gilbert G. Olson, of Pelican Rapids,
attempted suicide by hanging, but
failed.
An organization is formed at Crooks
ton, to include local real estate dealers,
bankers and loan agents.
'iThe Mankato theater has been in-
J^SsC-p*-
ffe
a in
S fl^i&Si??***,^
REYES RECEIVES ANSWER.
W a in to to
N a a on of
a of 1846
Washington, Jan. 8.—Gen, Rafael
Reyes, the Colombian special envoy,
has received the answer of the Washing
ton government to his note charging
the United States withjapen yjplation
of the treaty of 1846 %£$$£?
The answer, which was prepared by
Secretary Hay, though couched in the
most diplomatic terms, and expressing
the wish of this government to deal
justly with Colombia, is an emphatic
refusal to reopen the Panama ques
tion.
Prior to the receipt of the reply, Gen.
Reyes wrote to the state department
requesting that the correspondence be
transmitted to the senate for its con
sideration. Pending an answer to this
request, the correspondence will not be
made public.
Arthur M. Beaupre, United States
minister to Colombia, who arrived in
Washington on leave of absence, says
that Colombia will yield her present ag
gressive position in relation to the Pan
ama affair. She realizes that it would
be suicidal to attack the United States.
FUNERAL IS HELD.
a S S at Inter*
of a of E
id a
Princeton, N. J., Jan. 9.—The funeral
of Ruth Cleveland, who died Thursday
of diphtheria, was held at the family
residence at ten o'clock Friday morn
ing. The service was brief and simple
and was conducted by Rev. Maitland
Bartlett, pastor of the First Presby
terian church. In addition to the fam
ily a few of the closest friends of the
family were present. The interment in
the Princeton cemetery was private and
took place immediately after the serv
ice. At the request of her physician
Mrs. Cleveland did not go to the cem
etery. Among the hundreds of mes
sages of condolence from friends was
one from President Roosevelt.
ENTITLED TO ENTER.
S re me id it
to A re ]*ot Aliens, a
No a re
ol
Washington, Jan. 5.—In an opinion
by Chief Justice Fuller, the supreme
court of the United States decided that
citizens of Porto Rico are not aliens of
the United States and that they are en
titled to enter this country without ob
struction The opinion was delivered
in the case of the Porto Rican woman
Gonzales, who, in 1902, was refused ad
mission to the port of New York on the
ground that she was likely to become a
public charge. The decision was based
entirely on the immigration act of 1891
and took the ground that the Porto
Ricans owe allegiance to the United
States, and to no other government.
Colon, Jan. 9.—All the American ma
rines have now landed. The last con
tingent from the Dixie encamped at
Bas Obispo, 30 miles out on the line of
the railway. The work of constructing
intrenchments at Empire is being
pushed. Guns are now mounted there.
All the warships now patrolling the
coast are expected to assemble in the
harbor of Colon early next week.
a an a W a
Tokio, Jan. 9.—The Japanese govern
ment has practically determined to
continue negotiations. It is dissatisfied
with Russia's terms, as indicated in the
reply to Japan's last note, but does not
feel warranted in issuing an ultimatum
or breaking off negotiations and will
make another effort to secure their
modification before resorting to force.
in a
New York, Jan. 7.—There were
9,768 failures reported to Bradstreet's
in the calendar year of 1903, with lia
bilities of $154 277,093 and assets of
$84,060,475 This marked a decrease
in number of just two per cent, from
1902 and of eight per cent, from 1901.
id I S
Milwaukee, Jan. 9.—A special from.
Madison, Wis., says President Roosevelt
has been chosen to deliver the principal
oration at the semi-centennial jubilee of
the University of Wisconsin next June.
There seems to be no doubt that the
president will accept the invitation.
a it on a
Chicago, Jan. 7—Van Dine, Marx
and Niedermeier, three men accused
of the street car robbery and double
murder, and a long list of other des
perate crimes, were put on trial for
their lives in Judge Kersten's court
yesterday morning.
a A a
Chicago, Jan. 8.—Warren Barnhart,
oldest member and vice president of
the firm of Barnhart Brothers & Spin
dler, type founders, 183-187 Monroe
street, died at his late residence, 677%
La Salle avenue. Mr. Barnhart was 67
years of age. ~i'Z
f*
A
Mexico City, Jan. 9.—At the Los Lau
reles mines near the little hamlet of
La Yesca, west of Guadalajara, a large
number of boxes of dynamite which
were stored in a powder house exploded,
killing 20 men and injuring 40 others.
•&&* Apoplexy Causes Deaths.
Cedar Rapids, la., Jan. 9. J. H.
Coutts, president of the First national
bank of Tipton, has dropped dead in a
hotel here. The cause was apoplexy.
Mr. Coutts was 55 years old. ^F^rags
a a re
Capetown, Jan. 9.—It is officially an
nounced that peace has been declared in
Damaraland, German Southwest Africa,
and that the hostile Hottentots have
surrendered, ifel^:
Phone 8—2.
V.
,1 .|,•!•.|..1..|.•!•.|.fr*4..t4.»4^.4. I 1 fl» M-M .ji.|.frfr |T'MT!f'&ffi I 11 I 14
MRS. B. FOLLMANN.
»MM}^3»«H^4"M^3^4^**^fr*'S^4»4'4^4'4'4'4'^
N. HENNINGSEN,
THE LEADING INSURANCE AND REAL ESTATE MAN.*
I represent 25 of the largest and strongest Fire and Tornado in- S
surance companies in the world.
—I also represent the largest and strongest S
Bonding fidelity, Employers'liability, accident, fail and life
Insurance Companies.
I Improved and unimproved lands
bought and sold.
I have some bargains in Red River valley lands in Minnesota. The time to
buy land is now. If you buy land you are sure to save money. I have made
thousands of dollars for my clients. I can make money lor you.
•N. Henningsen, Insurance & Real Estate, New Ulm.
9 a is one of he a in he a
The high quality of
«GOLD COINK
-V*-Because-^-
THE BARLEY IS RIGHT
THE WATER IS RIGHT
THE HOPS ARE RIGHT
mpr?~-.^^S^BJl
FLOUR I
surprises everyone. Try a sack and you will
5 find a big improvement in your bread. Man
ufactured by
(Eagle Roller Mill Co
Daily capacity 3590 bbls. New Ulm, Minn.
Why is August Sctiell Brewing Co,'s beer always pure?
THE PLANT IS RIGHT
'lry a case of our Pilsener beer and be convinced. We delivtr to all
parts of the city.
Aug. Sctiell Brewing Co.
HARD MAPLE SOAP is absolutely free from harsh al
kalies, corrosives, and other adulterations. That is why it
is superior to other laundry soaps.
,55 &
#M
Some Fair Questions
put to intending purchasers are often
unanswerable. For instance, why bay 4.
Millinery* Goods and Hats!
where tbe prices .are far in excess of
quality? Why not select from our 4»
superb assortment of Trimmed and 4*
F-lt Hats, etc. These prices are tell- 4.
ing. Trimmed Hats at $7 for $3.50,
$5 for $2.50, $3 for $1.50.
-FOR-
Spong? C*b*s
and
Fine i3&king.
Sold in 51b. packages at all groceries.
TRY A SACK.
be
STnis Trade Mark is on Every Sack.^ betteryour cakes taste and look.
NEW ULM ROLLER MILL
\T
4.
»MM»4
',
New Ulnu Minn.
IK
^'Prised to find how
*&*.** 'SS.'k

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