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New Ulm review. (New Ulm, Brown County, Minn.) 1892-1961, March 30, 1904, Image 2

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New Ulm Review
Wednesday, March 30, 1904.
R. G. F. REINEKE,
SPECIALIST,
EYE, EAR. NOSE AND THROAT.
Office in the Ottomeyer Block. Hours
from 10 to 12 a. m. and 1 to 5 p. m.
W MINN.
R. J. H. VOGE2U
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
Office over Alwin's Drug Store.
Residence »n Broadway.
Residence Phone 179, Office Phone 188.
N E W ULM, MINN.
R. O. C. STRICKLER,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
Office over Alwin's Drug Store.
Residence cor. Broadwav & 2d N. St.
N E W ULM, MINN.
I)R
EDMUND W. BAYLEY.
PHYSICIAN & SURGEON.
Telephone 184.
to 4 p. m. and 7 to 9 p. m.
Hours 12
Office overGlsen's Druty Store
N E W X^LM, MINN.
LTOIDALE & SOMSEN,
ATTORNEYS & COUN
SELORS.
Practices in all State and U. S. courts.
Collections given particular attention.
Office orer Postoffice.
NEW ULM. MINN.
LBERT PF^ENDER,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
[Office in the Ottomeyer Block.
NEW ULM, MINN.
i)
A. HAGBERG,
ATTORNEY & COUNSELOR.
Office in Masonic Blk., 2d floor.
Legal adyice given and suits tried in
all courts. Collections attended to.
N E W ULM, MINN.
A. HEERS,
ARCHITECT AND BUILDER.
Office oa State street.
Plans and specifications furnished.
Contracts taken on all kinds of build
ings.
N E W ULM, MINN.
L. A. GEBHARDT.
Office in the Ottomeyer Block.
N E W ULM, MINN.
tyi W. FRITSCHE.
DENTAL BURGEON.
Oduntunder for extracting.
Office over Brown Co. Bank.
NEW ULM. MINN.
DR. GEO. R. KOCH,
DENTAL SURGEON.
Office ia the Postoffice block.
At Hanska the 2d and 4th Thursdays
©f each month.
N E W ULM, MINN.
C. & N. W. R. R.
DEPAR I UKB OF TRAINS BAST.
Pass. No. 504 ffix.San.) new line, 3:42 a
No. 24 (Ex.San.) aid line, 5:45 a
No. 502 (Daily) new line, 3:55
No. 22 (Dailyold line 3:56
No. 14 Ex. Sun.) new-line 0:55
DEPARTURE OFTRAINS WEST.
No. 13 Ex. Sun.Jnewlme, 7:52
No. 23 DailyV old bine, 1:00
No. 50S(Daily) new line, l:»8am
No. 27 (Ex. Sun old line, 8-40
No. 501 (Daily) new line. 13-43 a
Trains Nos.504 and 503 have sleeping cars
between Mankato and Chicago and chair
cars between Mankato and Minneapolis.
Ditjing- cars between Winona and Tracy
and Mankato and Minneapolis.
Trams Nos 504 and 501 have sleeping cars
between Minneapolis and Redfield, S. D.
Further information inquire of H. L.
Reecher, Agent.
A C. Johnson, C. A. Cairns
Gen. Ag't, Winona. G.P A Chicago.
Minneapolis & St. Louis
Time Table
at New Ulm, Minn.
March 2, 1904.
Corrected to
The Short Line" to
St. Paul. Minneapolis, Chicago,
St. Louis, Peoria, Kansas City,
Omaha, Des Moines
and all points beyond.
TRAINS LEAVE AS FOLLOWS:
NORTH BOUND
Twin City Pass, (daily) 5.55 a
Twin City Pass. (ex. Sun.) 1.50
Local Freight (ex. Sun.).. .3.30
SOUTH BOUND
Estherville Pass, (daily).. .8.54
StormLakePass.(ex.Sun.)12.28
Local Freight (ex. Sun.). .8.30 a
Elegant new Vestibuled Pullman
Sleeping Cars and Coaches run
daily.
For folders, rates, etc., apply to
G. W. NICHOLSON, Agent.
A. B. Cutts, G.
neapohs, Minn.
P. & T. A., Min-
RESIDENCE BUTTED BY FIRE
Flames Destroy Hom of Samuel
D. Peterson.
Hot Air Furnace Responsible Fo
Conflagration.
Dwelling Very Badly Damaged
Oaly Shell Remains.
Fire which broke out in Representa
tive S. D. Peterson's residence at the
corner of Minnesota and Second South
streets shortly before noon Saturday
practically destroyed the building and
caused a loss variously estimated from
$7,000 to $9,000. Inside of two hours
Mr. Peterson and his family were ren
dered homeless and much of their fur
niture was ruined or damaged. It was
the most destructive conflagration that
New Ulm has witnessed since the Van
Deusen elevator fire seven years ago.
An over-heated radiation pipe con
nected with a hot air furnace is thought
to have caused the blaze. In Mr. Peter
son's dwelling these pipes run upward
to the second story through the walls
and it is supposed that one of them be
oame too warm and the wood ignited.
Only ten minutes before the fire was
discovered Arnold Gulden, an employe
of Mr. Peterson and whose duties com
prise tending the furnace, visited the
basement. He did not see anything
wrong with the furnace and is confident
that the fire did not originate in the
cellar.
About twenty minutes to twelve, how
ever, Miss Susan C. Hohmann, prin
ipal of the high school and a boarder
at the Peterson home, noticed smoke
issuing from a register in her room.
She gave the alarm at once but in a
very few minutes flames broke out in
several of the apartments on the upper
floor. As the fire appeared at different
points almost simultaneously it is the
theory that it had been smouldering in
the walls for some hours and did not
gain gre-it headway until discovered.
An alarm was turned in from Box
32 and the department responded but
when the firemen reached the scene
they found themselves confronted with
several difficulties. Dense smoke filled
all the rooms, even to the basement,
and as the fire was concealed in the
walls it was very hard toworkeffective
ly. Flames would appear in one place
and be extinguished only to break out
at another, and in this way it was
necessary to use more water than would
ordinarily have been the case. The de
partment was successful in confining
the flames to the burning house, how
ever, and at no time were adjacent
buildings threatened by flying sparks.
When the fire was put out it was
found that only a shell of the building
remained. The roof of the south wing
was a total wreck and the wails and
partitions eaten away. In the early
stages of the fire a salvage brigade
succeeded in saving a piano belong
ing to Mrs. Peterson and another the
property of Miss Ida McCabe. Both
instruments were damaged, as were
also a large number of other house
hold articles carried out and Mr.
Peterson's valuable library. To this
water contributed as much or more
than fire and all the carpets and
draperies were ruined.
The owner of the building estimates
the damage to the structure at $6,000,
the total cost of erection having been
between $8,000 and $9,000. His house
hold goods and chattels he valued at
St,000 or $3,000 but the loss on these
cannot be reckoned, although it will
probably reach 40 per cent. In addition
the Misses Susan C. Hohmann, Ida
McCabe, Mary Fitzpatrick and Jessie
K. Hummel lost clothing and personal
effects having an aggregate value of
$500 or $600. Mr. Peterson carried
$3,000 insurance on the building in the
Springfield Fire & Marine Insurance
company and $1,700 on his furniture
in the Firemen's Fund but the property
of the young ladies was not insured.
Temporarily Mr. Peterson and family
will ocuupy Geo. Doehne's cottage on
Second South street.
This will Interest Mothers.
Mother Gray's Sweet Powders for Child
ren, Cure Feverishnesb, Bad Stotn ich.
Teething Disorders. Bteak up Colds, more
and regulate the Bowels and Destroy
Worms. They never fail. Over 30,009 tes
timonials. At all druggists, 25c, Sample
mailed FREE. Address, Allen S. Olmsted,
Le Roy, N. Y. 13
FIRST PR0BATL JUDGL
Funeral of John'B.£Xastor Held Here
Sunday.
John B. Castor, an early settler of
New Ulm and the first judge of probate
ever elected in Brown county, passed
away at the national soldiers' home in
Milwaukee, Wis., last Wednesday at
the advanced age of 75 years. De
ceased was born near Coblenz, Prus
sia, Feb. 2, 1829, and came to this
country in 1,843. He settled in Chicago
and was married in that city May 30,
185.5, to his surviving wife, coming to
this city the following year.
In the early days and when Brown
county extended as far westward as
the Missouri river, Mr. Castor was
elected judge of probate and some of
his old records are still on file. He
also served as county commissioner
In August, 1862, Judge Castor helped
repulse the Sioux attacks upon New
Ulm and subsequently enlisted in the
First Minnesota Mounted Rangers.
About ten years ago he applied* for
admission to the Minnesota Soldiers'
Home and remained there some time,
finally being transferred to the Milwau
kee home, where he died. The remains
reached this place Saturday and the
funeral services were held Sunday
from H. Forster's undertaking es
tablishment. Burial was made in the
city cemetery.
There Is No {lore Pain Prom Corns
After the Foot-Base Sanitary Corn Piasters
are first applied. They cure by Absorption.
The Sanitary Oils and Vapors do the work.
Try them. At all Druggists 25c. or by
mail. Sample mailed FREE. Address.
Allen S. Olmsted. Le Roy, N. Y. 13
ENCAUSTIC PAINTING.
The
Art Wai Practiced by Ancient
Greeks and Romans,
The use of paint brushes is of great
antiquity. But as late as the fifteenth
century it was customary to apply var
nish by smearing it on with the fingers
or with a bit of sponge, as the var
nishes then used were too viscid to
flow well with a brush and could be put
on more thinly and evenly with the fin
gers. This practice was used in the
earliest times of which there is any
record. The Egyptian mummy cases
bear evidence ot having been varnish
ed in this manner.
The use of fresco, or water color
paints, though the oldest, was not the
only method known to the ancients.
The Greeks and Romans especially
practiced encaustic painting. Encaustic
plaints were made of clarified bees
wax, with which, when melted, pig
ments were mixed. These paints were
applied hot with brushes or spatulse,
and when cold they were given a glazed
surface by holding a torch or a hot iron
near them. The hot iron was called
the "cauterium."
Another method is said to have been
to melt the wax with rosin, and after
the pigment was added the compound
was allowed to cool to a hard and brit
tle mass, which would be pulverized.
The colored powders made in this way
were mixed with water, so that they
could be applied with a brush like fres
co paint, after which they wrere melt
ed by the cauterium. If rosins were
thus used with the wax, a sort of var
nish was the result. If the wax was
used alone, the finished painting was
sometimes varnished. These colored
waxes were also used for writing. The
red especially was used for royal sig
natures, whence the use of red sealing
wax for a seal. And this "incausticum,"
as it was called in the middle ages, is
the origin of our word ink.—Cassier's
Magazine.
THE ALBATROSS.
In
Ouriona and Elaborate Dances
Which It Participates.
It is well known that many of the
cranes and other long legged wading
birds indulge in curious antics that
partake closely of the nature of the
human dance, but it is not known to
many persons that the albatross has
the most elaborate and ceremonious
dance of them all.
Only very few have ever seen the al
batross on land probably nine persons
out of ten who have seen the wonder
ful birds at all have observed them
only on the ocean.
One of the nesting places of this
great winged creature is the island of
Laysan, the Pacific ocean, and there
at times the ground is absolutely cov
ered with their nests. It is on Laysan
that the albatross dance was first seen
by a lucky scientist
The ceremony begins when a lot of
the birds are grouped in a circle. Two
will advance toward each other, bend
ing and nodding their heads in exact
imitation of the human bow. Then
they spar with their bills, crossing
them gently and still making funny
little bows. Then one bird will lower
its head and stand quite still in that
pose, while the other throws its head
back till the bill points straight into
the air. It puffs out its breast and ad
vances with a queer, fantastic strut,
uttering a curious grunt. The other
bird begins to snap its bill till it pro
duces the sound of castanets.
So the two will alternate, advancing
and retreating and bowing to each oth
er by turns. Sometimes one will pick
up a bit of grass or a feather and offer
it to the other. Then a second couple
will join the dance, and at last as many
as forty of the huge birds may be en
gaged in the queer pastime
Startled the Englishmen
A London paper relates that an en
terprising Yankee came over to Eng
land and decided to open a shop in
Birmingham. He obtained premises
next door to a man who also kept a
shop of the same description, but was
not very pushing in his business meth
ods. The methods of the Yankee, how
ever, caused the older trader to wake
np, and with the spirit of originality
strong upon him he affixed a notice
over his shop with the words, "Estab
lished fifty years," painted in large
letters. Next day the Yankee replied
to this with a notice over his store to
this effect: "Established yesterday.
No old stock
Licorice.
Licorice was once highly esteemed
medicinally, and its cultivation in Eng
land began early in the reign of Queen
Elizabeth. It was thought a sovereign
remedy for coughs and at one time was
a very profitable crop. Its name comes
from two Greek words signifying
"sweet root." The root was first im
ported from Spain. The extract of
licorice is still used in eandy and lozen
res and, it is said, must be made from
the dried roots, otherwise it is not so
bright and clear in color.
HER L0N6 JOURNEY ENDED
Mrs. Delight Tuttle Passes Away
at Advanced Age.
Settled in Brow County in Days
of Territorial Pioneers.
Came Her Illinois Wit
Oxen and Prairie Schooner.
Death claimed another of the very
early settlers of Brown county Friday
when Mrs. Delight Tuttle passed away
at the home of her son, Frank Tuttle,
in the township of Home. Mrs. Tut
tle had attained her ninety-second
year and was one of the oldest if not
the oldest woman in the county. She
was very widely known among the
older residents and by them was great
ly venerated and esteemed.
Mrs. Tuttle was born in Bradford
county, Pennsylvania, Feb. 2,1812. the
year which marked the opening of
hostilities between America and Eng
land, and was married at the place of
her birth when 22 years of age to
Albert Tuttle. With him she came
west in 1852, settling in McHenry
county, Illinois, where they remained
two years. Then with an ox team and
prairie schooner, and accompanied by
a number of other emigrants similar
ly equipped, they started for Minne
sota.
Their route lay through Iowa and
past the Chain Lakes and on the
morning of July 3, 1855, they came out
upon the Cottonwood river in what is
now the township of Leavenworth.
The party was in some doubt as to
their whereabouts but the following
morning they heard the Fourth of July
salute fired by General Sherman's
batteries at Ft. Ridgely and one of
the party traveled toward the sound
until he reached the encampment. He
learned their exact location and the
pioneers made preparations to remain
but later were told that the land they
had selected came within the Indian
reservation and that it could not be
homesteaded.
Upon learning this the Tuttles
moved down into MiIford, where they
lived for many years, but subsequent
ly Mr. Tuttle disposed of the property
and moved to the town of Home, tak
ing up his residence on the land where
his wife spent the remainder ot her
life. Mr. Tuttel was a member of the
first state legislature from Brown
county and represented a territory
which extended from New Ulm west
and north to Bismark, N. D.. and
south to the Iowa line. He died about
twenty ears ago.
The deceased needs no greater eu
logy than to say that she was a splen
did type of the pioneer woman. In
the early days she and her husband
kept open house in the full sense of
the word and many a weary traveler
found it a haven of rest. All of the
privations of the pathfinder fell to her
lot and, while a refugee in this city
during the Indian outbreak of 1862,
she saw her eldebt son, William Tuttle,
shot down outside the barricade.
Mrs. Tuttle is sur\ived by four
children, Mrs. Esther Behnke and
Mrs. S. A. George of this city Mrs.
L. C. Ives of Stark, and Frank Tuttle
of Home. Her funeral was held yes
terday from her late home, the serv
ices being conducted by Rev. Richard
Boynton, pastor of Unity Church, St.
Paul. The remains of Mrs. Tuttle
were laid to rest beside those of her
husband in the city cemetery here.
DUELING IN GERMANY.
I la
L.
Custom Firmly Established
Among the Students.
In every German university there ia
still dueling, and there will be as long
as German universities exist. Each
has its quota of fighting clubs, which
correspond to our own secret societies.
Every student is anxious to be invited
to join one of these clubs, and, having
been initiated, it is not long before he
is assigned to a duel. The members of
these various organizations are distin
guished by their colored bands and
caps, as our fraternity men are by
their Greek letter badges. The most
aristocratic of the fighting corps are
the Borussia at Bonn, to which all the
Hohenzollern princes belong, and the
Saxo-Borussia at Heidelberg, of wrhich
most of the German princes outside of
the Hohenzollerns are members. Other
prominent fighting corps are the Rhe
nania of the University of Wurtzburg,
Normania of Berlin, Franconia of Mu
nich and the famous corps of Hanno
vera, in which Bismarck was a famous
fighter, of Gottingen. Every corps has
its own officers, its own laws, rules,
regulations, but all are bound by a uni
versal "code of honor."
The customs and ceremonials inci
dent to these student duels are queer
and peculiarly fascinating, the cos
tumes and fighting attire unique and
interesting. The duels are of two
kinds—the one an "honor duel," where
one student has insulted another, and
honor has to be satisfied by a little
blood letting, but these are often not
infrequently the result of purpose
rather than qf actual insult just for the
sake of a little fighting. The German
student, like Tat, is often "spoiling for
a fight." The other kind of duel is gen
erally a more serious matter and is
known as "by agreement." It is by a
challenge from one corps to another
and partakes of the tournament order.
A list of dates is drawn up, and on a
certain day of each week a member of
the one corps meets a member of the
I other for "die mensur."—Fritz Morris
in Illustrated Sporting News.
Rates
West
Try a case of
parts of the city.
Phone 8—2.
•pVERY day dur
ing March and
April the Burlington
offers very low rates
to the west from the
Missouri river. ,***
$25.00 to Portland, Taeoma,
Seattle, SanTranoiaeo aad Lot
Angeles.
$22.50 to Spokane,
S20JQQ to Bntte, Helena and Salt
Lake.
or esp ondingly
low rates to hundreds
of other points.
If you are going
anywherewest better
write me for infor
mation. Maybe I can
offer you money
saving suggestions.
J. FRANCIS, Gotft Passenger Agent
Omaha, Neb.
N. HENNINGSEN,
THE LEADING INSURANCE AND REAL ESTATE MAN.*
I represent 25 of the largest and strongest Fire and Tornado in- ^1
surauce companies in the world.
—I also represent the largest and strongest
Bonding Fidelity, Employers' liability, accident, feail and life
Insurance Companies,
I Improved and unimproved lands
l^dllUd* bought and sold.
I have some ImigHins in Red Itiver valley lands iu Minnesota. The time to
buy land is now. If you buy land you are sure to save money. I have made
thousands of dollars tor my clients. I can make money lor you.
*N Henningsen, Insurance & Real Estate, New Ulm.
My agency is one of the largest in the state.
The high quality of
HGOUD
O I N
FLOUR
surprises everyone. Try a sack and you will
5 find a big improvement in your bread. Man
5 ufactured by
Eagle Holler Mill Co I
Dail capacity 3590 bbls. New Ulm, Minn.
Why is August Scnell Brewing Co.'s beer always pure?
-^-Because-2^_
THE BARLEY IS RIGHT
THE WATER IS RIGHT
THE HOPS ARE RIGHT
THE PLANT IS RIGHT
our Pilsener beer and be convinced. We deliver to all
Aug. Scliell Brewing Go.
.... Would like to have you try our.. ..
"Veribest" Brand of
Sugar=cured Hams and
....Bacon....
These goods are made from choice corn-fed hogs, cured and smoked
with great care—so as to give them a delicious flavor. We guarantee
these hams and bacon to be first in quality and flavqr, barring none
of the outside brands: and will gladly refund money if goods are not
as represented. We also carry a fine line of fresh Beef, Pork. Veal
and Mutton Sausages a specialty.
Stdebe's Jtfodel Jfledt JflafKet.
118 North Minn. St. Telephone 152.
This Trade Mark is on Every Sack.
NEW ULM ROLLER
FOR-
and
Fin? l3&l$ing.
Sold iu 51b. packages at all groceries.
TRY A SACK.
You will be surprised to find how
much betteryour cakes taste and look.
il\
9
&
rii 'i

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