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New Ulm review. (New Ulm, Brown County, Minn.) 1892-1961, July 27, 1904, Image 2

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5
New Ulm Review
Wednesday, July 27, 1904.
DR
G. F. REINEKE,
SPECIALIST,
EYE, EAR, NOSE AND THROAT.
Office in the Ottomeyer Block. Hours
from 10 to 12 a. m. and 1 to 5 p. m.
N W ULM, MINN.
R. J. H. VOGEL,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
Office over Alwin's Drug Store.
Residence on Broadway.
Residence Phone 179, Office Phone 188.
N E W ULM, MINN.
R. O. C. STRICKLER,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
Office over Alwin's Drug Store.
Residence cor. Broadway & 2d N. St.
N E W ULM, MINN.
OOIDALE & SOMSEN,
ATTORNEYS & COUN
SELORS.
Practices in all State and U. S. courts.
Collections given particular attention.
Office over Postoffice.
N E W ULM, MINN.
A LBERT PFiENDER,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Office in the Ottomeyer Block.
N E W ULM, MINN.
I)
A. HAGBERG,
J.
ATTORNEY & COUNSELOR.
Office in Masonic Blk., 2d floor.
Legal advice given and suits tried in
all courts. Collections attended to.
N E W ULM, MINN.
C.
A. HEERS,
ARCHITECT AND BUILDER.
Office on State street.
Plans and specifications furnished.
Contracts taken on all kinds of build
ings.
N E W ULM, MINN.
[)R. L. A. GEBHARDT,
Office in the Ottomeyer Block.
N E W ULM, MINN.
R. F. W. FRITSCHE,
CENTAL SURGEON.
rOduntunder
for extracting.
Office over Brown Co. Bank.
NEw ULM, MINN.
DR. Q. R. KOCH,
DENTIST.
Office in the Post Office Block, over
the City Drug Store.
N E W ULM, MINN.
C. & N. W. R. R.
DEPA8 IUKE OF TRAINS EAST.
Pass. No. 504 (Ex.Sun new line, 3 42 a
No. 24 (Ex Sun.) old line, 5-45 a
No. 502 (Drfily) new line, 3 55pm
No. 12 (Daily) old line 3 56 tn
No. 14 Ex. Sun.) new line 0:55
DEPARTURE OF TRAINS WEST.
No. 13 'Ex. Sun.) new line, 7.52
No. 23 Daily) old line, 1:00
No. 503 (Daily) new line, l:i)8am
No. 27 (Ex. Sun.) old line, 8-40
No. 501 (Daily) new line. 12-43 am
Trains Nos.504 and 503 have sleeping cars
between Mankato and Chicago and chair
cars between Mankato and Minneapolis.
Dining cars between Winona and Tracy
and Mankato and Minneapolis.
Trains Nos.504 and 501 have sleeping cars
between Minneapolis and Redfield, S. D.
Further information inquire of H. L.
Beecher, Agent.
A. C. Johnson, C. A. Cairns
Gen. Ag't, Winona. G.P A.. Chicago.
Minneapolis &St.Louis
Time Table
at New Ulm, Minn.
May 25th, 1904.
Corrected to
The "Short Line" to
St. Paul, Minneapolis, Chicago,
St. Louis, Peoria, Kansas City,
Omaha, Des Moines
and all points beyond.
TRAINS LEAVE AS FOLLOWS:
NORTH BOUND
Twin City Pass, (daily) 6.40 a
Twin City Pass. (ex. Sun.) 1.50
Local Freight (ex. Sun.).. .3.30
SOUTH BOUND
Estherville Pass, (daily).. .9.37
StormLakePass.(ex.Sun.)12.28
Local Freight (ex. Sun.). .8.30 a
Elegant new Vestibuled Pullman
Sleeping Cars and Coaches run
daily.
For folders, rates, etc., apply to
G. W. NICHOLSON, Agent.
A. B. Cutts, G.
neapolis, Minn.
P. &JT. A., Min-
EXCURSION RATES TO YELLOWSTONE
NATIONAL PARK,
Via the North-Western Line, daily, with
favorable return limits. Variable routes.
Most wonderful scenery in the world.
Apply to agents Chicago & North-West
ern R'y. 38
As
Minneapolis Journal,]
BOTCHERS' TRUCE
WAS SHORT LIVED
PACKERS AND STRIKERS REACH
AN AGREEMENT TO SUBMIT
TO ARBITRATION.
Men Start to Resume Work, But De
clare Discrimination Is Made in
Reinstating Them and Strike Is
Again Ordered.
Chicago, July 21.—The strike of the
50,000 butcher workmen at the great
meat packing plants of the United
States was settled Wednesday night.
By the terms of the agreement,
signed by representatives of each side,
all disputes pertaining to wages and
working conditions will be submitted
to a board of arbitration, and pending
an adjustment of the controversy the
men will receive the same wages that
were paid just previous to the strike.
The question of reinstating the men
on strike was the chief matter of dis
pute, and finally was disposed of by
an agreement that the men shall be
taken back as fast as possible without
discrimination. After 45 days from
the date work is resumed any former
employe who has not been taken back
will have the privilege of submitting
his case to arbitration.
Strike Is Renewed.
Chicago, July 23.—The stock yards
strike is on again On the charge that
the packers were discriminating against
certain persons in the reemploymont
process the union officials Friday or
dered their men to quit work, and the
situation at the yards is as bad as
ever The strike was renewed in other
packing centers also. Strike leaders
declare that unless the employers
change their attitude at once, all the
allied trades workmen will walk out
and that a complete stoppage of work
at the packing plants will ensue.
President Donnelly, after conferring
with other leaders, gave the order for
the strike and then sent this telegram
to union officials in other packing cen
ters of the country: "Packers already
have violated agreement by discrimi
nation. Order men out."
When the word that another strike
was ordered reached the workmen who
had gone to the different departments
to begin their labor, they finished the
work immediately in hand and then
marched in bodies out of the yards,
taking their tools with them.
Fail to Agree.
Chicago, July 25.—A general strike
of the teamsters, firemen and mechan
ical trades employed in the meat pack
ing industries in Chicago and other
packing house centers seems certain.
The union committee in charge of the
negotiations in the interest of the strik
ing butcher workmen submitted an ul
timatum to the packers demanding the
immediate acceptance by them of the
terms.
The three points in the ultimatum of
the labor representatives follow: All
strikers to be reinstated within ten
days workers in the killing, cutting and
casing departments to be taken back
within 48 hours after the resumption of
work strike of the allied trades on the
nonacceptance of those terms by the
employers.
In reply the packers unanimously re
affirm their previous stand. They pre
pared a letter, in which they declared
they had an agreement with the
butchers and were ready to put it in
force at any time. Therefore they
were in no position to negotiate for a
new contract. At the same meeting at
which the packers voted to make no
new concessions to the strikers they de
cided to attempt to open all their plants
here and elsewhere.
Values It Highly.
Esopus, N. Y., July 22 —Former Pres
ident Cleveland's published article dis
cussing the present democratic policy
and Judge Parker's leadership is re
garded by Judge Parker as likely to be
of great value in the campaign and as
one of the strongest apepals yet made
to democratic voters.
4
:Jiir^SI#:Mtfe
DOfJTHE
The Czar Should Have That Order of Breastplates Fitted to Be Worn in
This Fashion.
NAMED FOR GOVERNOR.
Joseph W. Folk Is Selected as Stand
ard-Bearer of Missouri
Democrats.
Jefferson City, Mo., July 22.—After
an all night session, marked by inter
vals of disorder and commotion that
could not be quelled by the gavel, the
democratic state convention unani
mously nominated Joseph W. Folk,
circuit attorney of St. Louis, for gov
ernor and adopted a platform which
promises vigorous, unrelenting crusade
against corruption and boodle in Mis
souri in the event of democratic su
premacy at the polls.
Joseph Wingate Folk, was born in
Brownsville, Tenn., October 28, 1869
His father is Judge Henry B. Folk, of
Brownsville, and his mother is a de
scendant of the Estes family of Virginia.
Mr. Folk is a graduate of Vanderbilt
university of Nashville, Tenn., Where he
finished his literary and legal education.
He practiced law in Brownsville for two
years and then went to St. Louis in 1892.
Soon he became identified with the
younger element of the democratic
party and first became prominent in
political circles when he was made a
charter member of the Jefferson club,
the leading democratic organization
He served in the capacity of president
of the organization in 1898. Mr. Folk
became generally known to the citi
zens of St. Louis through, the prom
inent part he took in the settlement of
the great street car strike of 1900. As
circuit attorney of St. Louis Mr. Folk
successfully prosecuted a number of
bribe takers in both branches of the mu
nicipal assembly.
President Passes Quiet Day.
Oyster Bay, L. I., July 25.—President
Roosevelt passed a very busy although
from a news viewpoint a quiet day at
Sagamore Hill Saturday. Secretary
Loeb joined him at an earlier hour than
usual and together they spent several
hours in the disposition of a large
amount of routine business which had
reached the president by mail and by
wire, principally from Washington. No
visitors had appointments with the
president Saturday.
Indicted for Bribery.
St. Louis, Mo., July 23.—Col. Edward
Butler, a prominent local politician, was
indicted Friday by the June grand jury
on the charge of bribing a witness. The
indictment grows out of the confession
of Charles F. Kelly, former member of
the house of delegates, who says that
Butler gave him $15,000 for leaving the
country and staying away, until the
bribe givers, against whom he had dam
aging evidence, were protected by the
statute of limitations.
Canadian Wins Shoot.
Bisley, England, July 25.—Private
Perry, Canada, won the king's prize
with a score of 321 points. He thus
takes the king's gold medal and a $1,250
purse, having defeated all the crack
shots of the British empire. His score
was ten better than the winning score
of 1903. The prince and princess of
Wales were among the spectators.
Davis to Be Notified.
Bedford Springs, Pa., July 25.—Hen
ry G. Davis, democratic nominee for
vice president, has made a decision in
regard to his notification. It will be
held at White Sulphur Springs, W. Va.,
either the first or second week of Au
gust.
To Notify Parker.
Esopus, N. Y., July 25.—Judge Parker
has fixed August 10 as the date for the
ceremonies notifying him of his nomi
nation by the democratic national con
vention as a candidate for the presi
dency.
Writ of Error Granted.
Frankfort, Ky., July 25.—The court of
appeals Saturday granted a writ of error
in the case of James Howard, under a
life sentence for the murder of William
Goebel. The case will go to the supreme
court.
Died at the Age of 103.
Philadelphia, July 25.—Mrs. Mary
Nixon, of Bryn Mawr, a suburb of this
city, who last Christmas celebrated her
one hundred and third birthday, died
Sunday.
RUSSIANS DRIVEN
mJm
APPROACH OF THE JAPANESE
FORCES CZAR'S MEN TO EVAC
UATE THE CITY.
JTierce Engagement Occurs in the Vi
cinity—Battle Viewed from House
tops in the City—Heavy Losses
Reported.
Newchwang, July 25.—The Russians
have evacuated this city.
Fierce Battle Rages.
Newchwang, July 25.—A battle was
fought Saturday near Tatchekaio, at
tended, it is believed, with heavy
losses. The progress of the battle was
watched by many people in New
chwang from the roofs of houses. The
day was clear and the smoke of the
guns could be plainly seen.
Oku's Men Fight.
St. Petersburg, July 25.—A badly
mutilated dispatch from Tatchekiao,
dated July 20, which has been received
here indicates that an engagement of
some importance had occurred on the
seacoast road between Kaichow and
Yinkow. The dispatch states that the
Russians made a night attack on a for
tified Japanese camp at Sangoss, on the
seacoast north of Kaichow. They got
•within close range and opened fire on
the camp before they were discovered,
and forced the retirement of the Jap
anese toward Kaichow. Later, how
ever, the Russians were forced to re
treat.
Victory for Kuroki.
Tokio, July 23.—Gen. Kuroki, after
a severe fight, occupied Kiaotung only
July 19. The place had been fortified
by the Russians, who defended it stout
ly. In the fighting Gen. Kuroki's troops
drove the Russians from their strongly
fortified position on the Chi river,
which is northwest of Motien pass and
east of Anping, inflicting upon the en
emy more serious losses than they sus
tained themselves. The fight began on
the 18th and ended on the 19th. The
Japanese lost 424 men in killed and
wounded. The Russian losses are esti
mated at 1,000.
Japs Repulse Fierce Attack.
Tokio, July 19.—At three o'clock
Sunday morning, a heavy fog veiling
their movements, two divisions of Rus
sians, commanded by Lieut Gen. Kel
ler, made an assault on the Japanese
positions at Motien pass. Gen. Kuroki
adds that the Russians assailed all the
Japanese positions at Motien pass and in
its vicinity desperately. The Japanese
resisted stubbornly, repulsed the Rus
sians and pursued them for a consider
able distance westward. Kuroki in his
report praises the valor of his men.
Fixes Loss at 2,000,
Gen. Kuroki's Headquarters in
the Field (via Fusan), July 20.—More
Russian troops were engaged in Sun
day's battle at Motien pass than in
previous engagements. There were
probably double the number of those
which took part in the fight at Yalu
river, while opposed to them were only
one brigade and one battalion of the
Japanese forces. The Russian loss iff
estimated at 2,000 The burial of the
dead continues. The Japanese casual
ties aggregated 300. The engagement
has conspicuously demonstrated the
wonderful efficiency of the Japanese in
fantry. They proved incomparably the
better marksmen, more initiative and
they outfought and outgeneraled the
Russians on every point.
[Relations to Be Resumed.
Washington, July 23.—Colombia is
again to come into full diplomatic re
lations with the United States and the
Panama matter will be a closed inci
dent between the two republics. The
state department has received a cor
dial letter from the Colombian minister
for foreign affairs announcing that Dr.
Thomas Herran has beenN given full
letters of credit as Colombia's envoy
at Washington. Dr. Herran for many
years was secretary of legation here
and after the hurried exit of Minister
Concha was charge d'affaires until the
legation was closed last winter as a re
sult of the Panama affair.
Thousands in Prison.
Washington, July 20.—The immigra
tion bureau has issued a statement show
ing a total of 44,582 inmates in the penal
reformatory and charitable institutions,
of the United States, not including Ha
waii and Porto Rico. These comprise
28,939 males and 15,643 females. There
are 24,717 prisoners serving for life, 10,
112 for over two years and 9,753 under
that period.
Death of Wilson Barrett.
London, July 23.—Wilson Barrett,
the actor, died Friday morning. He
underwent an operation for cancer July
20, and the doctors thereafter said that,
after a few weeks' rest Barrett would
be all right and able to carry out his
intention of producing a new play in
September. His death is attributed to
heart failure.
Chicago's New Directory.
Chicago, July 22.—The new city di
rectory for Chicago has been given to
the public. Based on the number of
names it gives Chicago a population for
1904 of 2,241,000. This figure is arrivedl
at by computing upon the census of 1899.
The new directory contains 657,000
names, an increase of 3,000 over the
directory of 1903.
Bates Are Eaised.
Detroit, July 25.—A general increase
in insurance rates was ordered Satur
day by the supreme tent, Knights of
the Maccabees of the World. Policies
hereafter will be furnished new mem
bers at rates ranging from 85 cents for
each $1,000, at the age of 18 years, to
$2.75 at the age of 50,
t-^JKg
mmm
bk- &b
#•#•#•#•#•#•#•#•$•#•#•#•#•
1 ry a case of
parts of the city.
Phone 8—2.
mm
N?HENNINGSEN,
THE LEADING INSURANCE AND REAL ESTATE WAN.
I represent 25 of the largest and strongest Fire and Tornado in
surance companies in the world. -'7l
—I also represent the largest and strongest—
Bonding fidelity, Employers' liability, Accident, *§ai( mid fife
Insurance Companies,
I Improved and unimproved lands
1^0llUO« bought and sold.
I have some bargains in Red River valley lands in Minnesota. The time to
buy land is now. If you buy land you are sure to save money. I have made
thousands of dollars for my clients. I can make money for you.
*N. Henningsen, Insurance & Real Estate, New Ulm.
My agency is one of the largest in the state.
The high quality of
HGOLD
I Why is August Schell Brewing Co.'s leer always pure2?
-V-Because-2^-
I THE BARLEY IS RIGHT
THE WATER IS RIGHT
1 THE HOPS ARE RIGHT
I THE PLANT IS RIGHT
Aug. Schell Brewing Co.
ciuiiHUiniiinniiHiiUiiitmiiiiuiiuimimtuuuiint uuuuuunuuuiui
.... Would like to have you try our....
"Veribest" Brand of
Sugar=cured Hams and
....Bacon....
These goods are made from choice corn-fed hogsT cured and smoked
with great care—so as to give them a delicious flavor. We guarantee
these hams and bacon to be first in quality and flavor, barring none
of the outside brands: and will gladly refund money if goods are not
as represented. We also carry a fine line of fresh Beef, Pork. Veal
and Mutton Sausages a specialty.
Stdebe's Jtfodel flfledt JVlar^et.
118 North Minn. St. Telephone 152.
You have heard of
..Angelina Flour..
but what you want to do is to
TRY A SACK.
You will then be convinced that all that you have heard
is true.
Manufactured by the
New Ulm Roller Mill Co.
BurtinOton
Special Rates
Are now offered by the Burlington
TO COLORADO RESORTS
Where the days and nights are all cool and the scenery
sublime.
TO YELLOWSTONE PARK
The "Wonderland" of the world, now more delightful than
ever before.
TO THE BLACK HILLS
Which Shall It Be
With their healthful spring waters and wonderful caves.
Tell me your preference and I
tion free.
Ja A N I S General Passenger Agent,
)SA"tM0
O I N
FLOUR
a surprises everyone. Try a sack and you will
5 find a big improvement in your bread. Man
5 ufactured by
iEagle Roller Mall Co
Daily capacity 3580 bbls.
New Ulm, Minn
our Pilsener beer and be convinced. We deliver to all
New Ulm, Minn.
,"!r
will give you full informa-
209 Adams St., CHICAGO.
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