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New Ulm review. (New Ulm, Brown County, Minn.) 1892-1961, February 01, 1905, Image 5

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89081128/1905-02-01/ed-1/seq-5/

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START CHURCH IN SPRING
Episcopal Congregation Purchases
B. Jun Lot.
Fund and Plans Ready for New
Place of Worship.
re to Four Thousand Dollar
Structure Planned.
The Episcopal church building which
has been a matter of speculation for
so long, is at last to become a reality.
The lot has been purchased, the plans
are all drawn, a large building fund
has been raised, and as. soon as the
frost is out of the ground in the
spring the work on the new place of
worship will be started.
Negotiations for the lot were closed
Saturday with B. Juni and Sunday at
the services in Gebser hall M. A.
Bingham, one of the building com
mittee, announced the news. The con
sideration is S800
The location is excellent, on the
corner of Broadway ana Second South
street, and will be convenient lor most
of the church members, who live on
the south side.
It is the plan to up a modest but
substantial building of red brick,
20x60 feet in dimensions. It will be
one story in height with a large base
ment which will be divided into rooms
for Sunday school purposes. The up
per floor will be used for the audi
torium and vestry rooms. The cost
will foot up to between $3,000 and
$4,000.
The plan ol building a church build
ing was first seriously thought of last
Are you run down,
Weak or Feeble?
Than use VINOL the great body
builder and strength creator for old
people, weak women and puny children
__ No one will dispute the curative
value of Cod Liver Oil. For centuries
it has been recognized as the grandest
of all body-building agents for wasted
human strength and vitality. But most
people cannot take Cod Liver Oil, to
them let us bay that VINOL in no way
resembles Cod Liver Oil. It does not
look, nor smell, nor taste like Cod
Liver Oil.
Yet VINOL is guaranteed to con
tain in a highly concentiated form all
the medicinal elements actually taken
from fresh cods' liver-., with organic
iron and other bodv-building in
gredients, in a dehciously palatable
and easily digested lorm.
Every bottle guaranteed to satisfy
or money refunded
Call and let u- explain its virtues
Eug.A.Pfefferle
The Reliable Druggist.
WHEAT
The market for Wheat has become
•lore Interesting again by reasons of
its wide fluctuations Not only is there
a better tone to the oiaiket, but talk of
oor demands for Wheat and Flour and
arge receipts of Wheat at primary
points hdb disappeaied, and attention
is now being directed to the news that
carries with it unmistakable evidence
£hat the shortage in the last crop was
not overestimated Foieign markets
also are advancing and getting in line
With general opinion that the making
ttp of the absence of United States,
Canadian, Australian and possibly
further Russian shipments cannot be
accomplished without a matena rise
1B prices.
Here at home we have a strong set
of conditions that are coming in force
to govern prices. Dealers in Flour
have been prevented from accumulat
in supplies by high prices, but they
must soon come in and replenish
stocks. Every advance has had back
of it reference to a scarcity of Wheat,
and until such time as these conditions
change it is going to be safe to follow
the buying side. W believe the mar
ke is gaining natural strength, and
would hold some Wheat for a perma
nent bull campaign when it appears
that country elevators are cleaned up
and the run of receipts practically over
for the year, as is the case at the pres
time.
EDWARDS-WOOD CO.
I
(Incorporated)
E A E S IN
STOCKS. GRAIN. PROVISIONS
MARKE REPORT.
Wheat No. 1
WheatNo. 3
No. 3
Com, per bushel
Oats,
Barley,
Ryp,
Flax,
Potatoes, ..
Onious,
Beans, white m.vy, per bushel
Eggs, per dozen
Butter, per pound.
Hogs, live, per hundied
Cows,
Steers,
Sheep,
Veal Calves,
Beef Hides,.
Hard Coal, per ton
Soft ..
Hard Wood, per cord.
Soft
Hay, per ton
Flour—100 lbs.
Patent $3 20
Straight 3 10
Bakers 2 60
Graham 2-80
Tiye 2 5
Shorts, per ton 5
Bian, per too 85
L08
104
.96
30
.30
40
65
1.05
.25
75
2 50
18
.15 to 20
8 3 80 to 4 0 0
2 00 to 2.50
2 50 to 2 75
2 50 to 3.00
4 00 to 4.25
7 J
10 00
$5.00 to 8 00
7.00 to 9 00
5 50
$6.00 to 8 00
Retail. Wholes.
$ 2 95
2 85
2.40
2.60
2 30
90
80
YOUR BRAIM. We are the only Arm in
&& city Whig exBluirfveiy wltb the
fanner. All MiQera know that our cars
m^m^^ama are o£ one grade and not elevator mixed,
wBScffaSuun8wljyoar»erriee4Bmoresatofa^rythaa
concern! Sutaptt tor gradate.
COOPER connissioN CO.. fltaDeapolU, man.
4r
winter when Bishop Edsall spoke so
encouragingly of the project that it
was at once taken up by the members.
He said he felt sure that if the congre
gation would go ahead with the work
he could secure outside aid of a sub
stantial sort.
A building committee comprising A.
W. Bingham, W. A. Bingham, F. H.
Behnke and R. L. English was appoint
ed to raise funds and secure a lot and
plans for a church. They began negoti
ations for the Juni lot and although
they had some difficulty at first in
making a bargain, they were at last
uccessful.
A gift from Mrs. Welles of Minne
apolis of 81,000 greatly encouraged
the workers and pledges from the
members came in more freely. After
paying for the lot, the committee now
has in its treasury $1,500 to apply on
the building, and with the aid expect
ed from the bishop the congregation
is hopeful of having its church free
from nearly, if not all, debt by the
time it is ready for occupancy.
Bishop Edsall is to be in the city
next Sunday and will probably dis
cuss the new church with his New Ulm
congregation.
Mankato with her double system of
telephone exchange is in trouble and
has appealed to the legislature for a
remedy. It seems that compettiion has
not worked to the best advantage of
the city and the board of trade pre
sented a petition urging the legisla
ture to place telephone and telegraph
companies under the jurisdiction of
the railroad and warehouse commis
sioners with power to fix rates and
compel reasonable service. Mankato
is particularly interested in obtaining
an arrangement whereby local systems
can connect with the long distance
system of the Northwestern Telephone
company. Mankato also wants the
telegraph companies to maintain a
night office in that town.
Gov. Johnson is at the very flood
tide of popularity. Society fawns at
his feet the commercial giants and
captains ot industry of the Twin cities
vie with each other in paying homage:
men of all political parties court his
favor. He is wined and dined and
feted and toasted and banqueted by all
sorts of societies and organizations.
From all over the country, tar and
near, invitations come to him. Lind,
Davis, Nelson, Van Sant—none of
these in their palmiest days ever
reached the place in popular estima
tion this modest and unassuming coun
try editor has attained since his inau
gural message to the legislature. How
long he will hold this place in the af
fections of the people remains to be
seen. A single mistake may end his
bnllant career. Who can tell? Fame
is fleeting and politics are uncertain.
—Martin County Sentinal.
P. A. Breitkreutz of Comfrey spent
Thursday in the city.
Mrs. Charles Helmes of St Paul is
in the city the guests of relatives.
George Glatzbach was down from
Sleepy Eye on business Thursday.
Mrs. L. P. Brocker of St. Paul is in
the city on a visit with her mother.
Dr. J. H. Vogel and Dr. J. P. Graff
made a business trip to St. Peter Fri
day.
A. W. Bingham made a trip to the
Twin Cities on business the lait of last
week.
Sheriff W. J. Julius was in the
Twin cities several days last week on
a social trip.
Adolf Bierbaum, who is attending
school in Mankato, spent Sunday at
home in this city.
Representative Ole Peterson of
Nicellet county paid New Ulm friends
a visit Saturday.
Joseph A. Eckstein made a business
trip to Rochester Wednesday and to
Winthrop Friday.
T. Mueller, Fred Williams
Ferdinand Sannwald spent a
hours in Nicollet Friday.
Redwood Falls citizens in
meeting have declared for a new
lie schoolhouse to cost $20,000.
and
few
mass
pub-
The appointment of George Glotz
bach as oil inspector for Brown coun
ty was confirmed last week by the sen
ate.
Mrs. Andrew Olin of Franklin ar
rived Monday evening for a visit with
her parents, Mr. and Mrs. S. D. Peter
son.
Be sure to call at J. F. Nenmann's
store next Monday, Feb. 6th, if you
want to see a nice line of spring gar
ments.
Anton Ochs and Louis Ochs were
passengers Friday morning for St.
Paul, where they attended a merchants'
convention.
GROWING ACHES AND PVINS
Mrt Josie Sumuor, Biemond, Texas,
writes, April 15, 1902 "I have used
Ballard's Snow Liniment IU my family
for thiee years. 1 would not b» without
it in the house. 1 have used it on my
little girl for growing pains and aches in
her knees. It cured her right away. I
have also used it for irost bitten feet,
with good success. 'It is the best li ni
ment 1 ever used.' 25c, 50c, $1.00.
Sold by Eugene A. Pfefierle. x&"
i^s^^
*mi
GREAT "SHERLOCK" BOOKED
Famou Detective of Ficti
-v & Y^Next Sunday^ /.
Si
Turne Theater Patrons to See4
es
Study in Scarlet."
A
Sir A. Conon Doyle's Most Thrill
ing Story Dramatized.
"Sherlock Holmes" the world fam
ous, is coming to New Ulm, not to
solve the great "New Ulm Murder
Mystery," but to entertain theater
goers in A. Canon Doyle's great de
tective story, "A Study in Scarlet."
He will be here next Sunday, Feb
ruary 5th, at Turner theater.
Seats are on sale at the City Drug
store and many have been secured in
advance.
"Sherlock Holmes" the greatest
detective in fiction, needs no introduc
tion to the reading public and the
story "A Study in Scarlet" wherein
the expert in criminology shows his
marvelous deductive power calls for
only a short one.
The story as dramatized centers
about an intense love drama enacted
on the plains of Utah in the Morman
settlement. The scene later shifts to
London where two mysterious murders
baffle the police and are only solved
by the great detective, who traces the
motive back to an early Utah tragedy.
The play is not one of the trashy
or bloodthirsty class of melodrama
but rises in its climaxes in true dram
atic strength. The plot is strong and
intense and is lightened by pretty love
scenes and bright comedy parts.
The play is produced under the
management of Tom Arthur and he
has gathered about him a company of
artists.
Fred W. Johnson spent Monday and
Tuesday in St. Paul and while there
was the guest of his brother. Gov
ernor John S. Johnson.
Dr. Kohler of Minneapolis, will be
in New Ulm Sunday, February 12th,
to do eye, ear, nose and throat work.
Hours from 9 a. m. to 3 p. m., at Dr.
Strickler's office.
Miss Ionia Seiter was surprised at
her home on State street Saturday even
ing by a party of friends who helped
her celebrate her birthday anniver
sary.
John L. Cuddy ot the firm of Cud
dy and Cavenaugh, is in Chicago
making business purchases. On his
way home he will visit for a short time
with relatives in Davenport, la.
Mrs. Eisenbach. who was committed
to the asylum at St. Peter two months
ago from New Ulm, has been returned
to the sheriff of this county on the
grounds that she cannot properly be
adjudged insane.
Miss Addie Olsen entertained a small
company of friends at her home on
State street Thursday evening. Whist
was played at three tables. Head
prizes were won by Richard Higgs and
Miss Martha Eichmann.
Clerk of Court John Larson took
the exhibits in the Koch case down to
Mankato yesterday and placed them in
charge ot the clerk of court of Blue
Earth county, Steven Thome. It was
no easy task, as the exhibits include
among other things a typewriter and
a large door.
Mrs. E. T. Critchett and her aunt,
Miss Helen Philips, left New Ulm
Monday for Republic. Kansas, where
they will spend the rest of the winter.
Professor Critchett accompanied them
as far as Mankato. It will be spring
in Kansas now in a week or so and
while we are having our worst weather
here everything will be pleasant there.
Attorney Henry N. Somsen and Fred
W. Johnson leave next Tuesday on a
trip south. They will go as far as
New Orleans and from there into the
western part of Louisiana. Their route
will be v\ ay of Lexington and Chat
tanooga. Mr. Somsen has business
interests which need his attention in
Louisiana and Mr John&on accom
panies him on a pleasure trip. They
expect to return in about two weeks.
Avers
For coughs, colds, bronchitis,
asthma, weak throats, weak
lungs, consumption, take
Ayer's Cherry Pectoral.
Cherry
Pectoral
Always keep a bottle of it in
the house. We have been
saying this for 60 years, and
so have the doctors.*
I have used Ayer's Cherry Pectoral Iff my
family for 40 years It is the best medicine
in the world, I know, for all throat and lung
troubles
MRS. J. K. NOBOBOSS, Waltham. Mass.
25C 50c gl 00. J. C. ATBB CO.,
All dmggistg. Lowell. Mass
for
The Lungs
Daily action of the bowels Is neces
sary. Aid nature with Ayer's Pills.
A prettjr calendar has been received
by the Review from A. I. Olding, now
the proprietor of a prosperous plumb
ing business in Redfield, S. D. &'
Mrs. Joseph Morintz of Alberta,
Canada, is visiting relatives and
friends in West Newton and Ridgley.
Her stay will extend through this week
at least.
3
f^ .«* It^x
IpAllen Potter and Miss Alma Leon
iLtd of Springfield were married Wed
nesday by Judge of Probate George.
The young people returned home the
same day.
There were two deaths Saturday,
both infants four weeks old. One was
the child of Mrs. Dietz and the other
little Viola Tanke: Both were buried
in the city cemetery.
Irs. Elizabeth Strickler has re
turned to her home in Lansing, Mich.,
after an extended visit in New Ulm
and Sleepy Eye with her sons, Drs. O.
C. and A. F. Strickler.
Judge of Probate S. A. George
Monday united in marriage John Gar
rioch of New Ulm and Miss Blanch
Pickle of town Home. The ceremony
was polished though simple.
An interesting feature of a sleighing
party last week was the walk to town
from Hauenstein's brewery by one
man and four young ladies, while the
rest of the crowd stayed and danced.
St. Anne Court, W. C. O. F., will
give another of their popular card
parties in the basement of the Catholic
church, Tuesday, February 7th. There
will also be a musical entertainment.
Ladies who are interested in a nice
spring Jacket, Cravanette, Suit or
Skirt should not forget to call at J. F.
Neumann's store next Monday, Feb.
6th, where you will find a large and
nice line to pick from.
Max Burg was in the city Saturday,
being home from a trip for the Burg
Cigar factory. He is wearing a new
overcoat, having had the misfortune
to have his other stolen from a hotel at
which he was stopping.
The following officers were installed
by the Knights of Pythias Monday
night: Adolf Wagner, C. C.: R. Higgs,
V. C. Albert Pfaender, C. R. S. C.
A. Zelle, P. C. Dirks, M. F. W.
Cavanaugh, M. W. J. Koehler, I. G.
A. Nagel, M. A. Dr. F. W. Fritsche,
A. G.
Rev. J. W. Brown of Montevideo
will preach morning and evening next
Sunday at the Congregational church.
He is said to be a very able preacher.
Rev. Mr. Knott, who has been filling
the pulpit for the last month, returned
to his home in Minneapolis the first of
the week.
The pioneers lost two out of three
games to Company A team Tues
day of last week, and Friday the Hau
brichs lost two games to the Buengers.
The scores were as follows: Company
A—630, 781, 799 Pioneers—698, 637,
797. Haubnchs—824, 693, 786 Buen
gers—682, 744, 828.
John H. Forster is on the program
of the fifteenth annual convention of
the Minnesota Funeral Directors as
sociation which meets in Minneapolis
at the state university February 16th,
17th and 18th. He 's one of the two
chosen to give a practical demonstra
tion of trimming caskets.
When the second trial opens in Man
kato New Ulm may be robbed of
her physicians for a few days at least,
as every medical man in the city is
subpoenaed by the state Dr. O. C.
Strickler, Dr. J. L. Schoeh, Dr. G. B.
Weiser, Dr. L. A. Fritsche and Dr.
J. H. Vogel all being witnesses.
Delegates from the southern part of
the state to the cement workers con
vention at Minneapolis praise the
qualities and appearance of the pro
duct of the New Ulm Stone company,
which was on exhibition during the
three-day's session. They expect to
see the material take first place in the
use for which it is intended.
Louis J. Buenger is now in Los
Angeles enjoying himself immensely.
He recently made the ascent of a
mountain, the last portion of which
had to be made on a donkev's back.
The New Ulm man writes that the hard
est part of the climb was finding an
animal that would carry Bim.
Clerk of Court John Larson believes
in having^all things properly labeled
and has very fittingly pasted on his
book of certificates of marriage this
little tribute, which he says is not
original: "Women—the fairest work
of the Great Author, the edition is
large and no one should be without a
copy.
Letters havejbeen received by friends
of Assistant Paymaster Frank
Baasen and Paymaster J. S. Beecher
saying that they[are now participating
in the naval maneuvers in the West
Indies, their ship, the cruiser Denver,
being one of those composing the fleet
commanded by Admiral Dewey. The
letter was written from Porto Rico.
Attorneysfof this city have received
bound copies"of the revised statutes of
Minnesota* for^ their consideration.
They are to go over them and mark
the changes they may suggest and re
turn them to the commission when the
entire work will be again taken up. I*
is a long and intricate piece of work
and one that will not be completed at
this session of the legislature.
February 16th is the date set for an
institute before the Farmers' Club, to
be held in this city. A number of
interesting and instructive topics will
be presented for- consideration, among
them rural telephones by A. D.
Stewart of Redwood county and a
talk on practical education for the boys
and girls of the farm.
The Commercial Bulletin of St.
Paul in its last issue published a
photograph of A. J. Alwin and a syn
opsis of a speech made by him at the
recent convention of the South Dakota
Retail Merchants and Hardware Deal
ers association held in Sioux Falls,
on the subject "Courtesies Equally
Between Salesman and Merchant."
No man in the city received the news
that the next trial of Dr. Koch is to be
held outside of New Ulm with greater
joy than Pat McHale, manager of the
local Western Union office. Pat has
had a strenuous time of it during the
last month, and while the trial was on
he sent some days as high as 20,000
words. In the evening he was assist
ed by I. L. Riem, the Eagle mill oper
ator, but even then they often worked
far into the night.
A POSITIVE NECESSITY.
Having to biy upon my bed for 14
days from a severely bruised leg. I only
found relief whpn I used a bottle of
Ballard's Snow Liniment. 1 can cheer
fully recommend it as the best medicine
for biuises ever sent to the afflictei. It
has now become a positive necessity
upon myself. D. Bvrnes, Merchant,
Doversville, Texas. 25c, 50c. $1 00.
Sold by Eugene A. Pfefierle.
Ernest Eyrieh, who for the last eight
years has been a clerk in Crone Bros.,
store, has decided to abandon the life
of the merchant for that of the plumb
er and has made arrangements to
enter the employ of Charles Stoll &
Sons the first of March. Mr. Eryich
learned the plumber's trade when he
was a boy in Le Sueur, but never fol
lowed it up. He has now decided to
start in where he left off years ago.
He is a popular salesman and Crone
Bros, patrons will be sorry to see him
leave.
WELCOME AS SUNSHINE
alter a long storm is a feeling of re
lief when an obstinate, pitiless cold
has been driven away by Allen's Lung
Balsam. Only people who have been
cured of thro at-ache and sore lungs
by this remedy can quite realize what
the feeling is. There is no opium in
the Balsam, its good effect is ladical
and lasting. Take a bottle home to
day.
Those who attended the trial of Dr
Koch probably never noticed that the
room was alwavs Jcept nicely heated
and that every morning everything
looked spick and span, no matter how
much dirt and confusion there might
have been the day before. Still if
things had not been so they would
have noticed it and somebody would
have been severely criticised, and that
sombody would have been the faithful
janitor, Henry Rowles. Henry took
as much pride in having the court
room look presentable as though it
had been his parlor and he certainty
did good work which the county com
missioners should appreciate. He was
kept up late every night and had to
roll out long before daylight the
morning.
DOING THE RIGHT THING.
The trouble begins with a tickling in
the throat and a nagging little cough.
Soreness in the chest follows and the
patient wonders if he l* going to have
an all winter cold. Probably, if he
does the wrong thing or nothing.
Certainly not if he uses Perry Davis'
Painkiller, the staunch old remedy
that cures a cold in twenty-four hours.
There is
Davis.'
ROYAL"
Baking Powder
Saves Health
The use of Royal Baking Powder is
essential to the healthfuiness of the
family food.
Yeast ferments the food.
Alum baking powders are injurious.
Royal Baking Powder saves health.
ROYAL BAKING POWDER CO., NEW YORK.
"Pretty Peggy" was canceled and
New Ulm theater goers missed one of
the best shows on the road this year. I Paul Hackbait
It was canceled not because the com- Ferd. Bleck
pany was not willing to play here nor Speath
because the local management was not
anxious to have it play, but be
cause the public did not seem to ap
preciate a good thing. Up to Friday
there had been advance sale of but
$20 and as the company was expecting
a $400 house, the outlook was too un
inviting and it refused to come.
SLEEPY EYfrBOWLERS ARE VICTORS
Beat New Ulm Players by Fifty-eight Pins it
Three Games.
New Ulm bowlers went down to de
feat in Sleepy Eye Saturday night, but
by a small score, fifth-eight pins in
three games. In the first game the
Sleepy Eye rollers had all the best of
it and piled up a lead of seventy-thtee
pins. The second game was more
nearly even and with a trifle better
luck the local boys would have won
as it was they lost by six pins. In the
third game New Ulm took a brace and
won easily by twenty-one pins.
The Sleepy Eye players have
promised a leturn game and are ex
pected down next Saturday. Eleven
of the local talent made the trip to the
neighboring city Saturday in a bob
sleigh, starting at 5 o'clock. After the
game they were treated to an oyster
supper by their hosts and shown a
good time generally. After the fun
was over the drive home was made.
The individual scores on both sides
are given below
NEW ULM.
Ed Grams 152
A. J. Meyei 151
12«)
118
109
R. Dahms
Wicherski
F. Williams
J. Vetter
C. Emmerich
A Burmeistei
A. Kelm
W. R. Hodge
A. McMaster
J. Hickel
M. Siedel
P. Gescbwind
O. W. nagci
W. Sundt
R. Brust
W Kelm
155
166
126
15.
1
167
168
119
14,
1
133
150
%i
-*3
170
160
143
98
128
1.S5
148
127
14J
161
132
14
160
H«)
106
196
98
127
131
182
187
117
14b
144
154
1407
1411
1418
SLEEPY EYE
154
130
191
191
126
127
132
127
10S
131
182
139
13»
151
121
107
141
IO-J
1480
1417
CRONE BROS. SPECIALS.
Look at our new aces and embroi
deries.
The best wearing shoe isthe Douglas.
Sweet Orr overalls and jackets to b»
had only at our place.
Just received a nice lot of Ladies'
white muslin underwear
Eggs taken in trade or cash.
Groceries received fresh every day.
Dr Fahrney Alpen-Kreuter is th©
best blood purifier
Read our ad.
Our dress goods stotk is a complete
beautiful line
SWIFT'S
PRIDE
SOAP
To introduce this i). m«!
of soap, we will foralimilt*
time sell
8 Bars for
25c
We guarantee it to
good as any of the st.
soaps.
Red Front Gr
Qeo. 'H&u?n
PARKL
Clesnae* and beam
Promote* a IBXUIU
Never TaSia to I
Hair to its Yon
Gores scalp dtoeaan
-"18
4
ttfJl
4
1
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