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New Ulm review. (New Ulm, Brown County, Minn.) 1892-1961, July 05, 1905, Image 2

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New Ulm Review
Wednesday, July
5 1S05
O A. ALEXANDER,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Prompt attention given to collections.
Insurance in good old line companies.
Office cor. Minn, and 2d. N. bt.
New Ulm,
R. J. H. VOGEL,
in
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
Office over Alwin's Drug Store.
Residence on Broadway.
Residence Phone 179, Office Phone 188.
NEW ULM,
N N
\R. O. C. STRICKLER,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
Office over Alwin's Drug Store.
Residence cor. Broadway. & 2d N St.
NEW ULM,
MINN.
OIDALES& SOMSEN,
ATTORNEYS & COUN
SELORS.
Practices in all State and U. S. courts.
Collections given particular attention.
Office over Postoffice.
NE W ULM,
t\\l. L. A. FRITSCHE,
MINN.
PHYSSCIAN AND SURGEON
Office over Brown Co. Bank.
NEW ULM,
A. HAGBERG,
ATTORNEY & COUNSELOR.
Office in Masonic Blk., 2d floor.
Legal advice given and suits tried in
all courts. Collections attended to.
NE W ULM, MINN.
0.
A. HEERS,
ARCHITECT AND BUILDER.
Office on State street.
Plans and specifications furnished.
Contracts taken on all kinds of build
ings.
N E W ULM, MINN.
I)R
F. W. FRITSCHE,
DENTAL SURGEON.
tduntunder for extracting.
Office over Brown Co. Bank.
NEW ULM, MINN.
DR. Q. R. KOCH,
DENTIST.
Office over Stuebe's mea't market. Of
fice phone, liS residence, 3H.
N E W ULM, MINN.
C. & INS. W R. R.
HKPAKiUKK OI' TRAINS EAST.
y,,. 504 (Kx.Sun.) tiew lino, 3 a in
Xo. 24 (Ex.Sun.) old line, r,:4aa tn
X«». 502 (Daily) new line, 3:an pin
Xo '11 (Daily) old line :-J:5«
No. 14- Ex Sun.) new line ii':5o in
DEPARTURE OF TWAINS WEST.
Xo. 13 'Ex. Sun.) newline
Xo. '2 Pailv) old line, 1:0(1
Xo. r.OSiDaily) new line, l:n8a
Xo 27 (Ex Sun.) old line, S:da
No. i)01 (Daily) new line. 12-43 a
Trains Xos.504 and a(»3 havesleepuifjcars
between Mankato anil Ckieago and chair
'•ar* between Mankato and Minneapolis.
Dinintf cars between Wit.ona and Tracy
9 I 1
Mankato and Minneapolis.
Trains Nos.504 and 501 have sleeping cars
Detween Minneapolis ami Kedrield, S.
Further information inquire of H. L.
Beecher.Ajrent.
A.C. Johnson, C. A. Cairns
Gen. Aji't, Winoua. G.P. A.. Chicago
Minneapolis & St,Louis
Time Table
at New Ului, Minn.
May 25th, 1904.
Cerrected to
The "Short Line" to
St. Paul, Minneapolis, Chicago,
St. Louis, Peoria, Kansas City,
Omaha, Des Moines
and all points beyond.
TRAINS LEAVE AS FOLLOWS:
NORTHBOUND
Twin City Pass, (daily)... .6.40 am
Twin City Pass. (ex. Sun.) 1.50
Tiocal Freight (ex. Sun.).. .3.30
SOUTH BOUND
Esthi/rville Pass, (daily).. .9.37
StormLakePass.(ex.Sun.)12.28
Local Freight (ex. Sun.). .8.30 am
Elegant new Vestibuled Pullman
Sleeping Cars and Coaches run
daily.
For folders, rates, etc., apply to
G. W. NICHOLSON, Agent.
A. B. Cutts,
neapolis, Minn.
P. & T. A., Min-
California Prune Wafers, nature's cure
for all bowel troubles. Act promptly
without pain or iuconvenience. 100 for
25 cents. ASK your Druggist.
MARE MONEY
hysending your
I E S
FlIRS^ETC
to us-We pay
hiffh prices &sell
gvm», traps etccheap
...W. HIDE & FUR CO.
eoo]?St. Minneapolis Minn.
FOR CATAU08UE AND PRICE LISTS
JURY HOLDS MANY
Milwaukee, July 3. Wholesale
"grafting" which,,.it is alleged, has
been going on for several years in Mil
waukee county, is expected to be laid
bare through the result of indictments
returned by the grand jury, coupled
with other indictments which were
handed down by two previous grand
juries and which cases remain yet to
be tried. Late Friday the grand jury,
which convened ten days ago, handed
down 38 indictments implicating 21 in
dividuals. Judge Brazee in the munici
pal court, at the request of District At
torney Frank E. McGovern, ordered the
issue of capias and for the arrest of
those indicted.
List of Indicted.
The list of individuals for whom
capiases were issued is as follows:
Herman Haasch, ex-supervisor Frank
Burkhardt, ex-supervisor J. J. Galew
ski, ex-supervisor Fred C. Shultz. news
paper reporter Peter J. Mead, ex-su
pervisor Charles Besfield, ex-super
visor G. F. Reichardt. supervisor Tony
Klefish. committee clerk county board
William H. O'Keefe, supervisor Au
gust Puis, ex-supervisor Benjamin Ba
den, supervisor Charles Bottenberg,
ex-supervisor J. F. Dittmar, ex-super
visor Albert C. Bade, ex-supervisor
Wr. C. Wegner, ex-supervisor Frank
Fowle, supervisor Frank G. Oelfiein,
ex-supervisor Arthur S. Green, super
visor Max Reinnoldt, ex-supervisor
Julius Stamm, real estate dealer Fred
Hartung. ex-supervisor and present as
semblyman.
Bail Furnished Rapidly.
As rapidly as arrests are being made
bail is being furnished in the sum of
$1,000 on the first indictment and ?500
on each additional, where more than
one indictment has been returned
against an individual. All the indic
ments charge bribery.
Result of Confessions.
The bundle of indictments handed
down is said to be the result of confes
sions obtained first by District Attor
ney McGovern from Otto Seidel, Jr.,
the register of deeds and former su
pervisor, and Edward F. Strauss, also
an ex-supervisor. These two men later
went before the present grand jury
and, it is said, laid bare the history of
many questionable transactions of the
county board.
To Cover Big Deals.
The present investigation, it is said,
will cover several big deals. Four years
ago a site for a new morgue was pur
chased by the board of supervisors,
and it is said $20,000 was divided
among certain members of the board
after the deal went through. Another
deal was executed, it is alleged, when
a large addition was built to the coun
ty hospital, and still another deal when
furniture was purchased for this addi
tion. Repairs to the county court
house have been added at various times
in the past few years, and it is alleged
contracture were compelled to pay lib
eral amounts to members of the county
board before contracts were awarded.
Another matter to come up is a charge
that during the last campaign one or
more employes of the county clerk's of
fice was employed at the headquarters
or the republican county committee
and drew double pay. The grand jury
has not yet concluded its labor, and
other indictments are expected to be
handed down at any time.
SECRETARY JOHN HAY. ^^^f^Ziz^'X
NOTED DIPLOMAT WHO PASSED AWAY SUDDENLY AT NEW
HAMPSHIRE HOME.
THE MILWAUKEE BODY INDICTS
TWENTY-ONE PUBLIC
OFFICIALS.
CONFESSIONS LAY
BARE MANY CRIMES
A so A in he
E W A re a
O a a of he
Board.
FEDERAL JURY INDICTS 18
'RESTRAINT OF TRADE" CHARGE
AGAINST BIG PACKERS.
Chicago Body, as Result of Three
Months' Investigation, Re
turns Many Bills.
Chicago, July 3.—An indictment wag
voted against 18 packers, officials oi
four packing corporations, by the fed
eral grand jury Saturday. Thus ended
the investigation which has lasted
over three months and brought out
testimony of over 100 witnesses. One
indictment of more than 60 typewrit
ten pages was voted, covering charges
including combination in restraint oi
trade, conspiracy to monopolize trade
and receiving and granting rebates
Among those included as defendants
are: J. Ogden Armour, of Armour &
Co. Edward Morris and Nelson Mor
ris, of Nelson Morris & Co. Arthui
Meeker, of Armour & Co. Louis Swift
and E. F. Swift, of Swift & Co. Ferdi
nand Sulzberger, of Schwarzschild &
Sulzberger company Samuel MacLean.
former head of the National Packing
company.
When the grand jury met.Saturday
two names were stricken from the list.
One of these is supposed to be that
of Michael Cudahy, whose health is in
a precarious condition. The other is
said to be Ira M. Morris, who, it is as
serted, is not sufficiently active in the
business of Nelson Morris & Co.
In the 65-page indictment the facts
are set. forth describing the specific
violations of laws prohibiting "com
bination in restraint of trade," accept
ance of rebates and conspiracy in re
straint of trade. Those accused of vio
lations of any or all the counts are
mentioned in connection with the spe
cific detailed statement of the viola
tion. It is not likely that there will
be an extended report upon the in
vestigation made by the jury.
Trials of those under indictment
will probably begin in the July term
of the district court, and the prosecu
tions are to be pushed through tc
final determination with the greatesl
dispatch possible.
TO HEAD RUSS DELEGATION
M. Muravieff, Ambassador at Rome,
Appointed Chief of Peace
Envoys.
St. Petersburg, July 3.—M. Muraveiff.
Russian ambassador at Rome and for
mer minister of justice, will be chief
of the Russian delegation at the peace
conference in August. His name has
been forwarded to Washington aa
plenipotentiary, but no further Russian
representatives will be named until the
size of the Japanese mission i3 ascer
tained. If Japan names three pleni
potentiaries, Russia will meet her
wishes in regard to the number. In
that case Baron Rosen will be accred
ited with M. Muravieff and in any
event assist him. It is possible that a
third negotiator may not be selected.
"Wages of Sin.
fUeveland, O., July 3.—Albert Henry
Darwin, 36 years of age, of Joliet, 111.,
a widower and father of two children,
shot and killed Mrs. Anna Gray, 30
years of age, the wife of a tailor living
on Ottawa street, in Joliet, here Fri
day afternoon, and then attempted sui
cide. He was prevented from doing
so by several men, who overpowered
him after he had killed Mrs. Gray.
Darwin was infatuated with the wo
man. The couple had eloped, and
have been away from Joliet for a num
ber of weeks.
Three Die in Heroic Attempt.
New York, July 3.—Three persons
were burned to death in a fire in a
four-story wooden tenement building in
Devoe street in the Williamsburg sec
tion of Brooklyn Saturday. They were
Arthur Bocklin, his wife Annie, and
Henry Handle. The fire is believed to
have been of an incendiary origin. All
three lost their lives while trying to
save their children who meanwhile had
escaped in safety.
CAREER OF NOTED
ST ENDED
SECRETARY HAY
PASSES AWAY
HAMPSHIRE
The Dead Official Looked Forward to
Position Which He Occupied from
Boyhood The President Sends
Condolences.
Newbury, N. H., July 3.—Secretary
of State John Hay died Saturday
morning. The signs immediately pre
ceding his death were those of pul
monary ombolism. Mr. Hay's condi
tion during all of Friday had been en
tirely satisfactory. Mrs. Hay and Drs.
Scudder and Murphy were at the sec
retary's bedside when the end came.
Secretary Hay left Washington last
Friday for his summer home on Lake
Sunapee. He had been in Washington
since the preceding Monday, after his
return from the several months which
he spent in Europe. During his brief
stay in Washington, Mr. Hay has at
tended actively to business before the
state department, and had had several
interviews with the president on im-
SUMMER HOME OF SECRETARY HAY,
W E E E DIED.
portant pending questions. A the
time of his departure he was looking
forward to a period of rest and recre
ation at his summer home, and fully
expected to return to Washington in
the fall fully recuperated in health
and strength. Although he appeared
considerably better than when he left
Washington for Europe, just following
his severe illness oi last spring, yet it
was evident to his family and friends
that he was far from being a well man.
The Dead Diplomat.
John Hay was born in Salem, Ind.,
Oct. 8, 1838, of an old Scotch family.
He was graduated from Brown uni
versity in 1858, and studied law at
Springfield, 111., with Abraham Lin
coln, who was then a neighbor, and
was admitted to the Illinois bar in
1861. He went to Washington with
President Lincoln as his assistant sec
retary. Mr. Hay was intensely loyal
to President. Lincoln, and entered hear
tily into all the duties that the mar
tyred chief magistrate assigned to
him. In 1864 President Lincoln gave
him a commission in the army, and he
was made a major and adjutant gen
eral, serving at Hilton Head, and later
in Florida, under Mr. Lincoln's per
sonal direction. When he was mus
tered out of the military service, April
22, 1867, he had won the brevet of
lieutenant-colonel and colonel "for
faithful and meritorious services dur
ing the war."
Having an ambition for a diplomatic
career, Mr. Lincoln decided to send
him to Paris, but before he had depart
ed the president was assassinated.
Mr. Hay's service under the diplomatic
branch of the government continued
for several years. He went to Paris,
as President Lincoln had planned he
should, as secretary of legation, learn
ing to speak the French language flu
ently before he resigned March 28,
1867, to become secretary of the lega
tion at Vienna under Minister Motley.
In June of 1869 he accompanied Min
ister Sickles to Madrid, where he re
mained till the autumn of 1870.
Soon after his return to this country
Mr. Hay, who had already written
sufficiently to attract attention as a
litterateur, embarked on a journalistic
career, and on the invitation of Horace
Greeley he became an editorial writer
on the New York Tribune, than a
power in republican politics.
From 1876 to 1900 he took an active
part in presidential campaigns. When
Mr. McKinley was elected president
he sent Mr. Hay as ambassador to
England, and especially during the
Spanish-American war he gave evi
dence at that eventful time of his con
ception of the fundamentals of Amer
ican policy in international affairs.
Although Mr. Hay secured the abro
gation of the Clayton-Bulwer treaty,,
brought about the reference of the
most far-reaching question in the re
cent Venezuela disputes-priority in
payment for a belligerent claimant—
to the international court of The
Hague, and arranged for the peaceable
adjustment of the Alaska boundary
question, he is known throughout the
world principally for the breadth and
foresight of his policy in Asia. Mr.
Hay came to the state^department in
September, 1898, at the close of the
Spanish war
Roosevelt in Grief.
Oyster Bay, L. I., July 3.—President
Roosevelt sent the following message
to Mrs. Hay: "Mrs. John Hay, Lake
Sunapee: I cannot believe the dread
ful news. Pray accept our deepest
sympathy in your terrible bereave
ment. I do not know what to say to
express my sorrow.
"Theodore Roosevelt,"
4 4
SUDDENLY
AT NEW
HOME.
HAD ACHIEVED HIS __
FOSTERED AMBITION
JtV^S^M -,,
•m—
P3I
Lands!
Try a case of
parts of the city.
E Phone 8—2.
m. HENNINGSEN, 1
THE LEADING INSURANCE AND REAL ESTATE MAN.
'I represent 25 of the largest and strongest Fire and Tornado in
surance compauies in the world.
—I also represent the largest and strongest^,—
Bonding fidelity, Employers'inability, accident, 1bail and Hife
Insurance Companies.
Improved and unimproved lands
bought and sold.
I have some bargains in Red River valley lands iu Minnesota. The time to
buy land is now. If you buy land you are sure to save money. I have made
thousands of dollars for my clients. I can make money lor you.
JN. Henningsen, Insurance & Real Estate, New Ulm.
My agencv is one of the lareest in the state.
snifiiHmiMwmHMwmmminmmimmimimwmmimifnm imnfflfmimmmmimiimmmimmimniimimmnra
1 is August Schell Brewing Co.'s beer always pure?
-4^-Because-i^- 1
THE BARLEY IS RIGHT
THE WATER IS RIGHT
THE HOPS ARE RIGHT
THE PLANT IS RIGHT
our Pilsener beer and be convinced. We deliver to all
Aug. Schell Brewing Go.
mmuuiiiinimiimniuuuiii Dmimiumuuniimuuuiummiuumuii
You have heard of
AngelinaFlo ur..
but what you want to do is to
A SACK
You will then be convinced that all
is true.
Manufactured by the
New Ulm Roller Mill Co.
Kansas City Southern Railway
(Straight as the Crow Flies"
KANSAS CITY TO THE GULF
PASSING THROUGH A GREATER DIVERSITY OF
CLIMATE, SOIL AND RESOURCE THAN ANY OTHER
RAILWAY IN THE WORLD, FOR ITS LENGTH
Along its line are the finest lands, suitedfor growing small grain, corns flax,
cotton for commercial apple and peach orchards, for other fruits and ber
ries for commercial cantaloupe, potato, tomato and general truck farms:
for sugar cane and rice cultivation for merchantable timber- for raising
horses, mules, cattle, hogs, sheep, poultry and Angora goats.
Write for Information Concerning
FEMALE
WEAKNESS
E E O E N E N O E S E A S
New Colony Locations, improved Farms, Mineral Lands, Rice Lands and Timber
Lands, and for copies of "Current Events," Business Opportunities,
Rice Book, K. C. S. Fruit Book.
Cheap round-trip homeseekers' tickets on sale first and third Tuesdays of
each month.
THE SHORT LINE TO
E LAND OF FULFILLMENT"
K. DUTTOXT, Trav. a Agt. 8 O. W A S E S G. and A.
Kansa City, Mo. Kansa City, Mo.
P. E O E S S Trav a and Xmigr'n Agt., Kansa City,
Mtl- 3 Congress St.
VownaJXD,, MAIKB, Oct. 17,1991.
I consider Wine of Cardui superior
to any doctor's medicine I ever used
and I know whereof I apeak. I suf
fered for nine months with suppressed
menstruation which completely pros
trated me. Paine would shoot through
my back and sides and I would hare
blinding headaches, lay limbs would
swell np and I would feel so weak I
eould not stand up. I naturally felt
discouraged for I seemed to be beyond
the help of physioians, but Wine of
Cardui came as a God-send to me. I
felt a change for the better within a
week. After nineteen days treatment
I menstruated without suffering the
agonies I usually did and soon became
regular and without pain. Wine of
Oardul is simply wonderful and I wish
that all suffering women knew of its
good qualities.
n«MiAA an%
'^3^s*ae^sjg*'
Treasurer, Portland Boonomio League
Periodical headache* tell of fe
male -weakness. Wine of Cardui
cores permanently nineteen out of
every twenty cases of irregular
menses, bearing down pains or
any female weakness. If you are
discouraged and doctors have
failed, that is the best reason in
the world you should try "Wine of
Cardui now. Remember that
headaches mean female weakness.
Secure a $1.00 bottle of Wine of
Cardui today.
WINE
CARDUI
Wi^ii^u^^^^-^^^Mid^^^^M^i^^m
New Ulm, Miuu.
that 37-011 have heard
To Land Agents.
This to call your notice to the fact
that the Minneapolis fc St. Louis R.
R. will sell daily during- the summer
months round trip tickets at one fare
plus two dollars to certain northern
Minnesota and Dakota points, limit
for return October 31st. Low round
trip tickets also on sale daily to St.
Paul and Minneapolis after June 1st.
For particulars call on agents, or
address, A. B. Cutts, G. P. & T. A.,
Minneapolis, Minn.
WANTED—^yChicagjomanufactuing
House, person of trustworthiness and
somewhat familiar with local territory
as assistant in branch office. Salary
$18 paid weekly. Permanent position.
No investment required. Business
established. Previous experience not
essential to engaging. Address, Man
ager Branches, 323 Dearborn St.,
Chicago. 21-6t
Homeseekers' Rates.
Via the Minneapolis & St. L»uis R.
R. On tirst and third Tuesdays of
each month, to Nebraska, Kansas,
Missouri, Arkansas, Oklahoma, In
dian Territory, Texas, New Mexico.
Colorado, and other states. Stop
overs allowed and tickets limited
twenty one days. For rates, time of
trains, etc, call on agents or address,
A. B. Cutts, G. P. T. A.. Minne
apolis, Minn.
mt
0
A neat little circular telling
all about those fine fluffy Rugs
A made from your old carpets.
i\Uvrb MPLS. CARPET CLEANING
RUG FACTORY. 112 4th St. N., Minnea
polis, Minn. 7-l'06
asMammm
i'
I
1
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