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New Ulm review. (New Ulm, Brown County, Minn.) 1892-1961, September 06, 1905, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89081128/1905-09-06/ed-1/seq-2/

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New Ulma Review
Wednesday, Sept. 6, 1905.
F.
A. ALEXANDER,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Prompt attention given tojcollections.
Insurance in good old line companies.
Office cor. Minn, and 2d. N. St.
NewTJlm,
I)R.
J. H. VOGEL,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
Office over Alwin's Drug Store.
Residence on Broadway.
Residence Phone 179, Office Phone 188.
NEW ULM, MINN.
iR. O. C. STRICKLER,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
Office over Alwin's Drug Store.
Residence cor. Broadway & 2d N St.
NEW ULM,
piR. L. A. FRITSCIIE,
PHYS5CIAN AND SURGEON
Office over Brown Co. Bank.
NEW ULM,
1 A. HAGBERG,
Office over Stuebe's meat market. Of
fice phone, 158 residence, 36.
NEW ULM.
ftbrf*
I N N
OIDALEI& SOMSEN,
ATTORNEYS & COUN
SELORS.
Practices in all State and U. S. courts.
Collections given particular attention.
Office over Postoffice.
NEW„ULM, MINN.
MINN.
ATTORNEY & COUNSELOR.
Office in Masonic Blk., 2d floor.
Legal advice given and suits tried in
all courts. Collections attended to.
NEW ULM, MINN.
0
A. HEERS,
ARCHITECT AND BUILDER.
Office on State street.
Plans and specifications furnished.
Contracts taken on all kinds of build
ings.
NEW ULM, MINN.
JYR. F. W.'PRITSCHE,
DENTAL SURGEONL.
Uduntunder for extracting.
Office over Brown Co. Bank.
NEW ULM, MINN.
DR. Q. R. KOCH,
DENTIST.
N N
C. & N W R. R.
UEPARTL'KK OF TRAINS EAST.
Pass. No. oOl (Ex.Sun.) new line, 3:42a
No. 24(Ex.Sun.) oldline, 5:45am
No. 50i (Daily) new line, 3:55
No. 23 (Daily) old line 3:56
No. 14 Ex. Sun.) new line 6:55 pm
DEPARTURE OF TKAINS WEST.
No. 13 (Ex. Sun.) new line, 7:52
No. 23 Daily) old line, 1:00
No. 503 (Daily) new line, l:i8am
No. 27 (Ex. Sun.) old line, 8:25
No. 501 (Daily) new line. 12-43 am
Trains Nos.504 and &03 have sleeping cars
bet-ween Mankato and Chicago
a
chair
-ars between Mankato and Minneapolis.
Dining cars between Winona and Tracy
and Mankato and Minneapolis.
Trains Nos.504 and 501 have sleeping cars
Detween Minneapolis and Redtield, S. D.
Further information inquire of H. L.
Beecher, Agent.
A.C.Johnson, C. A. Cairns
Gen. Ag't, Winona. G.P. A.. Chicago.
Minneapolis & St.iouis
fime Table
at New Ulin, Minn.
May 25th, 1904.
Corrected to
The "Short Line" to
St. Paul, Minneapolis, Chicago,
St. Louis, Peoria, Kansas City,
Omaha, Des Moines
and all points beyond.
TRAINS LEAVE AS FOLLOWS:
NORTH BOUND
Twin City Pass, (daily) 6.40 a
Twin City Pass. (ex. Sun.) 1.50
7ocal Freight (ex. Sun.).. .3.30
SOUTH BOUND
Esthu^ville Pass, (daily).. .9.37
StormLakePass.(ex.Sun.)12.28
Local Freight (ex. Sun.). .8.30 am
Elegant new Vestibuled Pullman
Sleeping Cars and Coaches run
daily.
For folders, rates, etc., apply to
G. W. NICHOLSON,"Agent.
A. B. Cutts, P. &jT. A., Min
neapolis, Minn.
California Prune Wafers, nature's cure
for all bowel troubles. Act promptly
without pain or inconvenience. 100 for
25 cents. ASK your Druggist.
MARE MONEY
bysendmg your
HIDES
FURSlETC
tous-Wepayr
.- nighprices &seu
£ini9,traps etccheap
N.W. HIDE & FUR CO.
eoolgStU Minneapolis rlmn.*
?Brr^FOI^/VTAroOU^5^^MC^UST5l
gf- g?^-.:
1
CESSATION OF HOSTILITIES TO
TAKE PLACE AFTER TREATY
IS RATIFIED.
FORMAL END OF WAR
IS SOON TO FOLLOW
Text of Portsmouth Agreement Will
Not Be Kept from the Public
Signing Is to Be Quiet and Un
ostentatious.
Portsmouth N. H., Sept. 2.—An
armistice has been signed, to take
effect after signature to the treaty.
The delay in cessation of hostilities
was due to refusal of Japan to con
sent to earlier time.
Japan has refused to consent to the
cessation of hostilities until the treaty
of peace has been signed. The Rus
sian plenipotentiaries, accompanied by
their secretaries, called on Baron Ko
mura and Mr. Takahira shortly after
noon Friday and were in conference
with them for half an hour. Japan
having indicated Thursday night
through Baron Komura her willing
ness for an armistice. Mr. Witte, sup
posed Friday that he would find them
ready to sign. Baron Komura ex
plained that while his government was
ready to consent to an armistice, his
instructions were that this.should not
take effect until after the signing of
the treaty. The discussion lasted for
half an hour, the Russian position be
ing that Japan's contention was with
out precedent, and that if the armis
tice was not to take effect until the
signing of the treaty, it was practical
ly unnecessary. However, the Japan
ese were insistent and an agreement
was accordingly entered into, provid
ing for an armistice which shall take
effect the moment the treaty is signed.
Mr. Sato Explains Stand.
Mr. Sato, in explanation of Japan's
insistence that the armistice shall not
go into effect until the treaty is signed,
said: "It is necessary that not only
the commanders in the field, but all
the commanders of ships, shall be
notified, and this necessarily requires
a little time. Japan did not desire to
have the armistice go into effect until
the commanders on sea and land havq
been notified, thus insuring the main
tenance of the agreement." It is pointed
out in Japanese circles that an armis*
tice has practically been in effect since
the conference began, and it is de
clared that there is no ground for
anxiety for a clash before the signa-.
ture of the treaty.
Text of Treaty Coming.
It is now expected that the text ol
the peace treaty will be completed by
Saturday night or Sunday. Full sum*
maries, if not the actual text, will then
be cabled io Tokio and St. Petersburg
for the approval of the respective gov
ernments, and by Tuesday, or Wednes*
day at the latest, Mr. Witte and Baron
Komura expect to receive final author*
ity to affix their signatures. The sub*
sequent exchange of ratifications by
the two governments will be simply a
formality. The conditions of the
armistice, or rather complete suspen-.
sion of hostilities marking the con
clusion of the war, have been ar
ranged, except for minor details, by
the plenipotentiaries here.
Signing" to Be Quiet.
The ceremony of signing the "Treaty
of Portsmouth" will be as quiet and
unostentatious as possible. Both sides
desire to avoid any spectacular feat
ures. Both realize that, for different
reasons, the treaty will not be pop
ular in their respective countries. In
Japan especially there is expected to be
a great popular outcry. "We know,"
said a member of the Japanese mis
sion Friday, "that we are going home
to stones and perhaps dynamite." No
arrangements looking to a joint fare
well visit to President Roosevelt have
been made or even suggested. Baron
Komura and Mr. Witte will go sep
arately to Oyster Bay. to express
thanks on behaif of their respective
countries and say "good-by." Mr.
Witte expects to sail September 12 on
the Kaiser Wilhelm II. He has al
ready provisionally engaged a suite of
rooms on that steamer. Baron Ko
mura has provisionally engaged cabins
on a steamer sailing from the Pacific
coast September 20. He and his suite
expect to leave New York September
12. The projected trips of the mis
sions to the White mountains have
practically been abandoned because of
lack of time.
No Secret About Agreement.
The "Treaty of Portsmouth" is to
be given 4 the world. There is to be
no secret about it, neither government
having any reason to withhold it. Its
provisions are therefore to be pub
lished broadcast textually, but not im
mediately. Mr. Sato said to the press
Friday that it would not be given out
until the final ratifications had been
exchanged by the sovereigns of the
two' countries. The treaty will be
engrossed on the treaty paper of the
American state department, a pecul
iarly fine quality of linen parchment
paper. Two of the caligraphers of the
state department have Leen sent for
to come here and do the engrossing.
It is officially stated that President
Roosevelt will not come to Ports
mouth to be present at the signing of
the treaty.
Tannery Plant Burns.
Columbia, Pa., Sept. 2.—The tannery
plant of Henry Hollinger was de
stroyed by fire Friday. The loss is
estimated at $100,000 partially in
sured.
S O MINNESOTA
A Grand Chance."
A golden opportunity presents itself
to the homeseeker in the sale of Min
nesota state lands. Approximately
260,000 acres will be sold under the
state laws of Minnesota and the terms
,on which this land is sold are such as
•to permit a man of small means to se
cure for himself a home of his own.
The lands will be sold at public auc
tion to the highest bidder. But 15 per
cent of the purchase price needs to be
paid at the time of sale. The balance
may run for forty years at 4 per cent
annual interest if desired. Bear in
mind that the settler is dealing with
the State of Minnesota and that the
title to all state land is perfect, makes
this an uucommon offer. The lands
owned by the state of Minnesota are
distributed particularly in the north
ern part of the state, some in rich
wheat fields in the western portion of
the state, and in the main, will grow
anything that is indigenous to the soil,
and this section is admittingly the
most perfect dairying country in the
United States. S., G. Iverson, the
state auditor and land commissioner
has charge of these sales and the loca
tions of the lands, as well as specific
terms of sale will be gladly furnished
by him.
Pttople Get Benefit.
Dtiluth. —The prices of kerosene and
gasoline were reduced one-half a cent
a gallon as a result of the recent deci
sion of the state railroad and ware
house commission in ordering a reduc
tion in shipping rates. The cut in
prices mean a saving of 8140,000 to the
people of the state in the course of a
year.
The state commission ordered ship- tacks by the populace.
ments of oil in less than car lots be en
tered as fourth instead of third-class
freight by the railroads. This reduc
tion in rates resulted in a cut of half a
cent a gallon on coal oil and gasoline
throughout the state. The annual
consumption of these products in Min
nesota amounts to about 28,000,000
gallons, and it is from this the saving
of money as a result of the warehouse
commission's action is computed at
$140,000 a year.
Fatalities.
Minneapolis.—The percentage of fa
tal accidents in factories, mills and
workshops in Minnesota is increasing
to a rather remarkable extent, accord
ing to a report issued by Labor Com
missioner W. H. Williams, covering
the accidents of the last six months.
Mr. Williams reports that 439 acci
dents occurred during the six months,
and that of these forty-one, nearly 10
per cent, were fatal. The percentage
of fatal accidents in 1004 was 6.02 per
cent.
No reason is known for the increase
in fatalities, and an investigation will
probably be made. One of the objects
of receiving reports on accidents is to
enable the bureau to keep in touch
with conditions in the factories, mills
and workshops and to ascertain
whether the laws of the state regard
ing the safeguarding of machinery are
complied with.
Everlasting Ice Cream.
Minneapolis.—The state dairy and
food commission has a sample of ice
cream that possesses wonderful merits.
It tastes deliciously, melts in the
mouth almost as easily as butter, looks
enticing, and retains all its splendid
qualities just as well in a leather
satchel as on a block of ice. It is the
kind of product the housewife can buy
a week before she gives -an ice cream
party or ladies' aid societies can keep
what is left over from one ice cream
social until the time time rolls around
for a similar function.
J. G. Fowler, food inspector of the
department, purchased this wonderful
ice cream from one of Minneapolis
most popular parlors. It was a com
position of gelatin, starch and custard.
An Old Relic.
Ked Wing.—Bernt Eide, while de
stroying the old sidewalk of the Schref
property on Sixth street, found a relio
of the time of the revolutionary war.
While digging a few inches below the
surface of the ground his attention
was attracted by a glimmering bit of
yellow lying partly buried in the dirt.
Stooping over, he picked up a rare
locket of old gold. Upon one side were
some unknown designs, probably the
motto or mark of some secret society,
and on the opposite side appeared the
name of "Horace Wilder" and the date
"1776"
News Notes.
St. Paul—Charles Eckblade, suffered
a fracture of his right thigh and and
two ribs while at work in the Ameri
can Hoist & Derrick works.
Winona—Frank A. Johnson, the
bachelor capitalist of Winona, who has
been a familiar figure on the streets of
this city for a number of years, died
at St. Mary's hospital in Rochester.
St. Paul—The residence of Timothy
Foley, was damaged by fire to the ex
tent of $7,000. The loss is covered by
insurance amounting to $40,000.
Rushmore—Rushmore has voted to
have a fourth room added to its school
which will give the children of the
vicinity regular high school work.
Dodge Center—During a storm light
ning struck the dome of the public
school house, shattering it somewhat,
but doing no serious damage to the
building.
Mankato—County Auditor Weaver
has forwarded to Brown county the ex
pense account of the third Koch trial,
which foots uo, exclusive of attorney
hire, to 84,654 50.
St. Paul—Young men giving the
pames of William Jounson and J. Gir
oux. were shot while attempting, it is
alleged, to break into the saloon of
B, Connolly, Jackson and Acker
itraati.
EARLY ANATOMISTS
Dissection Was Practiced ,In Egrypt
'•^"i In'300 B. C.
Dr. William Williams Keen tells
some interesting facts regarding the
early history of dissection. The first
human anatomists were in Alexandria
three centuries before Christ, and they
and their successors for 2,000 years
were commonly reported to have in
dulged in antemortem dissection. Says
Dr. Keen: "Vesalius was shipwrecked
and died -while fleeing for his life on
such a charge. The Edinburgh act of
1505, giving the surgeons the body of
one criminal annually 'to make an
anatomle of,' was guarded by the pro
viso 'after he be deld.' Even poetry
has lent its aid to perpetuate the leg
end of the 'invisible girl,' whose ghost
was believed to haunt Sir Charles
Bell's anatomical rooms, where she had
been dissected alive on the night pre^
ceding that appointed for her mar
riage."
For a long time Alexandria was the
only medical center of the world, and
the physician Galen (born about 130
A. D.) had to journey from Rome to
the African city even to see a skeleton.
He sent his students to the German
battlefields to dissect the bodies of the
national enemies, while he himself
used apes as most resembling human
beings. Human dissection was revived
in Bologna in the fourteenth century,
where Madonna Manzolina later was
professor of anatomy, undoubtedly one
of the first women doctors, if not the
very first. Leonardo da Vinci, painter
of "The Last Supper," was a great
anatomist, but dissection had fallen
Into disuse when Vesalius finally re
vived it about the middle of the six
teenth century.
Even in comparatively modern times
anatomists have been the objects of at
In 1765 Dr.
John Shippen of Philadelphia was
mobbed as a grave robber. Doctors'
riots In New York occurred twenty
three years later and were due to the
belief that the medical students robbed
graves continually. It was the lack
of opportunity that led to the practice
of grave robbing and originated what
Dr. Keen calls "a set of the lowest
possible villains—the resurrectionists."
WORK.
The work which presents no difficul
ties to be overcome soon grows unin
teresting.
There are some workers so anxious
to catch time by the forelock that they
almost tear the forelock off.
If It is true that good, work implies
that the workman knows himself it is
equally true that the best work shows
that he has forgotten himself.
There is only one right way to work,
and It is neither in doing things before
they are started nor in doing them all
over again after they are finished.
The world is altogether too restricted
in its use of the word "art." Work of
any kind done superlatively well is art
—dusting pictures as well as painting
them.
A good worker is pretty much like a
horse, after all. When it's uphill going
don't worry him when it's downhill
going don't hurry him, and be sure to
take good care of him once he's in the
barn.—Success.
An Oxford Bank Note.
The Clarendon Press once made a
bid for printing the notes of the Bank
of England. It was many years ago,
when the forger was abroad in the
land, and it was desired to make his
task more difficult. A sample Oxford
note was adorned with a number of
unintelligible quotations from out of
the way languages—Arabic, Coptic and
others. It was thought no forger
could produce them, and an elaborate
argument was given in with the sam
ple note to that effect. Nowadays any
note may be copied by photography,
and the unique quality of its paper is
the security of the Bank of England
against fraud.—London Sketch.
A Business Talk.
"Miss de Simpson," said the young
secretary of legation, "I have opened
negotiations with your father upon the
subject of—er—coming to see you
oftener with a view ultimately to
forming an alliance, and he has re
sponded favorably. May I ask if you
will ratify the arrangement as a mo
dus vivendi?"
"Mr. von Harris," answered the
daughter of the eminent diplomat,
"don't you think it would have been a
more graceful recognition of my ad
ministrative entity if you had asked
me first?"—Chicago Tribune.
Malay Houses,
Malay houses are invariably built on
posts, so as to raise the floor from four
to six feet above the ground. The floor
Is composed of bamboo, with inter
stices between slats, the earth beneath
becoming the receptacle of the drain
age of the establishment. The uni
versal plan of the well to do natives
is to build the house in two divisions,
the front one for receiving visitors and
lounging generally, while the rear por
tion Is reserved for the women and
children.
Elephant Sajgaclty.
A remarkable instance of the sagac
ity of a female elephant which had lost
her young one in a pit trap has re
cently been related. The mother made
strenuous attempts to rescue her off
spring by throwing quantities of earth
and branches of trees into the pit, but
all her efforts were in vain, as the
hunters arrived before the pit was suf
ficiently filled to allow the young one
to clamber out.
Advice.
Widow (tearfully)—Yes, my daugh
ters _are now my only resources.
Friend—Take my advice and husband
your resources well.
I Phone 8—2.
NJKHENNINGSEN,
THE LEADING INSURANCE AND REAL ESTATE MAN.
I represent 25 of the largest and strongest Fire and Tornado in
surance companies in the world.
—I also represent the largest and strongest
Bonding fidelity, Employers' inability, accident, and flite
Insurance Companies*
I 2irifle? Improved and unimproved lands
l^dlllld* bought and sold.
I have some bargains in Red River valley lands in Minnesota. The time to
buy land is now. If you buy land you are sure to save money. I have made
thousands of dollars for my clients. I can make money for you.
$N. Henningsen, Insurance & Real Estate, New Ulm.
My agencv is one of the largest in the state.
siwnimmfflmmmmmiiffliminiifflfflifflnifnminniiiimmm mmrnmmimmiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinmiimimniiimig
AllC. 5CHELL BREWlrfC (OIUlPQlW 1
QllllllillllllUlllllllllillllltllDlllllllllllillllllllllllllll aiUIIIHililiHllllllllllllillllllllimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiii.il
You have heard of
..Angelina Flour..
but what you want to do is to
TRY A SACK.
You will then be convinced that all that you have heard
is true.
Manufactured by the
New Ulm Roller Mill Co.
Kansas City Southern Railway
'Straight as the Crow Flies"
KANSAS CITY TO THE GULF
PASSING THROUGH A GREATER DIVERSITY OF
CLIMATE, SOIL AND RESOURCE THAN ANY OTHER
RAILWAY IN THE WORLD, FOR ITS LENGTH
Along its line are the finest lands, suitedfor growing small grain, corn, flax,
cotton for commercial apple and peach orchards, for other fruits and ber
'ies for commercial cantaloupe, potato, tomato and general truck farms
f»r sugar cane and rice cultivation for merchantable timber- for raising
hordes, mules, cattle, hogs, sheep, poultry and Angora goats.
Write for Information Concerning
CREE
Because this great medicine
relieves stomach pains, frees the
constipated bowels and invigor
ates the torpid liver and weak
ened kidneys
No DOCTOR
is necessary in the home where
Thedford's Black-Draught is
kept. Families living the
country, miles from any physi
cian, have been kept in health
for years with this medicine as
their only doctor. Thedford's
Black-Draught cures bilious
ness, dyspepsia, colds, chills and
fever, bad blood, headaches,
diarrhoea, constipation, colic
and almost every other ailment
because the stomach, bowels
liver and kidneys so nearly con
trol the health.
THEDFORD'S
BLACK
DRAUGHT
GOVERNMENT HOMESTEADS
New Colony Locations, improved Farms, Mineral Lands, Rice Lands and Timber
Lands, and for copies of"Current Events," Business Opportunities,
Rice Book, K. C. S. Fruit Book.
Cheap round-trip homeseekers' tickets on sale first and third Tuesdays of
each month.
THE SHORT LINE TO
HEALTH
"I don't think we could keep
house without Thedford's Black
Draught. We have used it in the
family for over two years with the
best of results. I have not had a
doctor in the house for that length
of time. It is a doctor in itself and
always ready to make a person well
andhappy."—JAMBS HALL, Jack
sonville, 111.
E LAND OF FULFILLMENT"
H. 3 SUTTON, Trav. Pass. Agt. S. Q. WASHES, G. P. and T. A
!*j Kansas City, Mo. Kansas City, Uo.
E. ROESLEB, Trav. Pass, and Xmig'n Apt., Kansas City, Bio.
1
As a Hot Weather 1
Beverace
good, properly cooled and
served beer is always a
strong- favorite—you try 1
other drinks, but you come
back to beer. Made of pure
water, pure hops and other 1
materials and manufactured 1
by skilled workmen, Schell's 3
beer is hard to equal, im- 1
possible to excel.
New Ulm, Minn. 1
To Land Agents.
This to call your notice to the fact
that the Minneapolis & St. Louis R.
R. will sell daily during the summer
months round trip tickets at one fare
plus two dollars to certain northern
Minnesota and Dakota points, limit
for return October 31st. Low round
trip tickets also on sale daily to St.
Paul and Minneapolis after June 1st.
For particulars call on agents, or
address, A. B. Cutts, G. P. & T. A.,
Minneapolis, Minn.
WANTED—By Chicago manufactuing
House, person of trustworthiness and
somewhat familiar with local territory
as assistant in branch office. Salary
$18 paid weekly. Permanent position.
No investment required. Business
established. Previous experience not
essential to engaging. Address. Man
ager Branches, 323 Dearborn St.,
Chicago. 21-6t
Homeseekers' Rates.
Via the Minneapolis & St. L»uis R.
'. R. On first and third Tuesdays of
each month, to Nebraska, Kansas,
Missouri, Arkansas, Oklahoma, In
dian Territory, Texas, New Mexico,
Colorado, and' other states. Stop
overs allowed and tickets limited
twenty one days. For rates, time of
trains, etc, call on agents or address,
A. B. Cutts, G. P. & T. A., Minne
apolis. Minn.
PARKER'S
HAIR BALSAM
Cleanses and beautifies the hair.
Yxomotes a luxuriant growth.
Never Fails to Bestrre Gray
Hair to itB Youthful Color.
Cures icalp diseases & hur fulling.
60c,and 100 at Dnggista

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