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New Ulm review. (New Ulm, Brown County, Minn.) 1892-1961, June 04, 1913, Image 7

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89081128/1913-06-04/ed-1/seq-7/

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10 to
12
Visit
ing
12-130
or 2
2-3
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"Infant welfare"
Miss Augusta Mettle
3-4
"How to handle a bad
boy"
or
"Three years experi
ence with tbe girls of
the street"
John E. Gunckel
President of tbe Nat.
Newsboys' Association.
4-5
"Polly of the Circus"
or
"The dawn of a tomor
row"
or
Program of dramatic
readings and imperson
ations.
Miss Harriet Hetland
"How to develop the
good in a bad boy"
John E. Gunckel
A
This Mystery
PUZZLING FINGER PRINTS
Famish tk« oaly clew to
SENSATIONAL NURDER
Wu it the dead man's beautiful ward, who
had millions to lain?
Waa it hia eon, from whom he had parted
in anger?
Or waa it tome intereated third party or an
accomplice
ONLY THE FINGER PRINTS CAN TELL
For t/€ anjttfer read
TheArgyleCase
-MW^W
i&w?
WHO MADE THEM
4
Solv
Business men's lunch
eon address
"The industrial strug
gle"
or
"Business & Health"
Dr. Raymond V. Phelan
Illustrated lecture
"Early Greek civiliza
tion"
Professor John C.
Hutchinson
"Civic welfare"
"What the Old World
can teach the New"
Dr. Raymond V. Phelan
"Story and Song"
Mrs. Eleanor Poehler
Contralto
Miss Mary Allen
Pianist
The University
Club
Miss Kate kebrvap **nrt Horbort
Grussendorf went to St. Paul to be
married Tueidey. They did not out
Hoe their plane to anj of their friende
but they are expected home this
month. Both young people have been
engaged in telephone work for tome
time and Cupid evidently got the
wires crossed. Good wishes will have
to take the place of a nice little write
up because we can't give details.
A very unique "shower" was ar
ranged in honor of Miss Lydia Sha
pekshm at the home of Miss Alma
Raabe Thursday evening. Twenty of
Miss Schapekabm's girl friends were
asked to dress each a bottle of any
chosen shape, size or contents, to re
present a doll.
vV
"Public Health"
Dr Ernest B. Hoag
3-3:45
"Books as tools of effi
ciency"
Miss Clara Baldwin
3:45-4:30
"Tbe evolution of
song"
Dr. James Davies,
soloist
Mrs. Catherine Parker
pianist
4:30—5:15
Glee
(Twelve men)
Mrs. Eleanor Poehler
Contralto
"Public discussion and
democracy"
Professor Frank M.
Harig
Music
Debate:
"Resolved, that tbe
women of the United
States should be given
the ballot"
or
Resolved, that social
ism is preferable to the
present order.
Stanley Gillam
H. L. Hall
Carl Painter
Edwin Dahlberg
As many kinds of-
bottles as there were guests were re
presented and prizes were given for
the prettiest doll and the most conic
one. Mis* Lena Wellner was awar
ded first honors and Mrs A. P. Boock
got the other trophy. The rooms were
prettily decorated with wild flowers and
refreshments were served. As a final
mark of esteem, Miss Shapekabm was
presented with a cut glass bowl.
Now is the time to select your wall
paper at 5c per double roll at J. H.
FORSTER'S. Advt 10
Lest week Tuesday morning Henry
J. Landsteiner of Fairfax and Miss
Anna M. Buechl were united in the
holy bonds of matrimony at the
Catholic Church, Rev. Schlinkert
officiating. M. J. Buechl and Miss
Louise Landsteiner attended as wit
nesses to the ceremony. After the
ceremony a reception was tendered the
newlyweds at the home of the bride's
parents, Mr. and Mrs. M. Buechl, at
which only the immediate relatives
and friends attended. The young
couple left the same day for a short
honeymoon trip to the Cities. They
will make Fairfax their nome where
the groom ie engaged in the tinner's
business, being a member of the firm
of Landsteiner & Co.
Foley Kidney Pills repay your con
fidence in their healing and curative
qualities. Any kidney or bladder dis
ease not beyond the reach of medi
cine will yield to their use. Mrs.
Cordelia Copeland, Ardeola, Mo.,
says: "I had kidney and bladder trou
ble for over a year and 5 bottles of
Foley Kidney Pills cured me." It is
the same story from everyone who
uses them. All say, "they cured me."
For sale by O. M. Olsen.
University Week in New Ulm at Turner Hall, June 2nd to 7th inclusive.
Afternoons Free Evening 25c Season Ticket $1.00.
O N A a E S A 3 FRIOAX 6 WEDNESDA BATUWPAY
The members of the staff will be glad to meet the people of the town and surrounding country at this time to visit and to
learn about the various interests of the community. No formal exercises will be given before noon.
"The social influence of
the Drama"
Dr. Hardin Craig
"Plays and games for
children"
Miss Edna S. Fischer
of the Mankato Normal
(Of special interest to
parents and teachers)
'Uncle Remus Stories"
Dr. Hardin Craig
Illustrated lecture
The vroscone-A prac
tical demonstration
or
The art of flying—Il
lustrated with motion
pictures.
Dr. Burt L. Newkirk
*V"-i*7* if
Just as if playing the piano
When you play the
you control the expression COMPLETELY—
you secure the effects you want INSTANTLY—
you PEEL that you are PLAYING a musical in
strument—
you enjoy the artist's sensation of PERSONALLY
producing music reflecting your every mood—
HAMILTON
Manualo
The Player-Piano that is all but human
ID playing a piano, the fingers do two things: Fir6t, they pick out
the keys (notes) to be struck as the the music directs. That is the
mechanics of playing. Second, they give the mindthe sensation of touch
—)the "feel" of tbe keys so that the performer uses just the right
force to secure the volume and accent desired. That is giving expree
sion to the musical feeling.
In playing the Manualo, the perforations in the music roll pick out
tbe keys (notes) to be Btruck. Thus the mechanics of playing ie takeD
care of mechanically. But tbe Manualo leaves to you the expression—
enables you to color the music as your musical feeling directs because,
through the pedals, you experience the same sensation of touch that tbe
pianist obtains from fingering the keys. Here is tbe way the Manualo
makes possible this wonderful control:
First of all, every change in the
strength and accent of pedaling tbe
Manualo makes a corresponding
change in the volume and accent of
the music. The pedaling acts so di
rectly on the piano hammers that
they strike tbe strings with a force
proportionate to that of tbe pedaling
and with identically the same ac
cent. Every strength of pedaling
from the easiest to the most forceful
produces a corresponding volume
from the softest to the loudest. And
every degree of accent on any stroke
of the pedals accents the note or
passage affected to like degree.
Then tbe kind of pedaling which
produces each effect has a distinct
sensation of touch to the feet. The
"feel" of the pedals indicates to a
nicety with what volume and accent
the music will play.
Lastly, the feet are naturally sen
sitive to these changes of touch.
We dance to music. A lively tune
puts action into our feet not our
hands.
W. J. Winkelman
Business Men's lunch
eon address
1
'Financing the farmer''
Professor C. W.
Thompson
"Education for effici
ency"
Professor A. V. Strom
or
Professor G. A. Works
"Successful Co-opera
tion"
"Socialism for and
against"
Professor C. W.
Thompson
Program of dramatic
readings and inter
pretations
Mrs. Dorothy
Kurtzman
Illustrated lecture
"The Panama Canal"
Dr. E. V. Robinson
We even walk in rhythmic time.
Unlike the hands, which have to be
trained to finger tbe keys, tbe feet
need but little practice to be in
stinctively guided by the "feel" of
the pedals so that the natural musi
cal impulses expressed through the
pedaling make the Manualo respond
with just the expression which your
musical feeling desires.
Therefore in playing tbe Manualo,
you have the pleasure of really play
ing a musical instrument of pro
ducing a music as you wish it be
cause you control the expression on
the same principle that tbe pianist
controls it—the principle of touch.
You feel yourself determining the
volume of every passage. You feel
tbe accent on the accented beats.
You feel the melody singing its solo
above the accompaniment. You
feel tbe crashing chords. In a word
through the pedaling you feel your
self playing the Manualo as inti
mately as if yon were playing the
piano by hand.
"Sex Education"
Dr. Anna J. Norris
(For mothers and their
daughters)
Local base ball game
might also be scheduled
at this hour.
"The conservation of
Old World gifts in
art and crafts"
Maurice I. Flagg
or
Miss Scovel
Program of dramatic
readings and Imper
sonations
Miss Emilie Eggen
Dramatic club
in
"Judah", a three-act
drama by
Henry Arthur Jones
EIGHT NATIONS
LIKE PEACE PLAN
Make Favorable Answers to
Biyaa's Proposals. "1#-•#
SEVERAL ASK FOR MORE TIME
Italy, Great Britain, France, Brazil,
Sweden, Norway, Peru and Rus-
sia Will Sign Peace Pact.
Washington,*^laY 31.-|Bscretary "1
Bryan signalized the4ay cofppemora- if fc
tlve of the country's~hero dead by an
nouncing that eight nations have re- '-A
sponded favorably to bis peace plan
asking that suggestions be submitted
in regard-to details. The nations in
the order in which they have accept
ed are Italy, Great Britain, France,
Brazil, Sweden, Norway, Peru and
Russia.
Secretary Bryan said that no na
tion, to which .his peace plan was sub
mitted, had replied adversely, al
though some had asked more time tor
consideration.
To each of the governments ex
pressing a willingness to enter into
the peace agreement a tentative state
ment has been submitted embodying
details suggested by the president.
The secretary, pointing out that this
statement was submitted for consider
ation, with no intention of insistence
upon any particular detail, declined to
make public its contents.
Mr. Bryan discussed tbe progress of
his plan in the following statement:
"It will be remembered that about
a month ago a plan was, by the presi
dent's direction, submitted to all the
governments having representative*
here, the plan being in substance a»
follows:
Provisions of the Peace Plan.
"First—That the United States is
prepared to enter into an agreement
with each and every country severally
providing for the investigation of all
disputes of every nature by an inter
national commission, the contracting:
parties agreeing not to declare war or
begin hostilities until such investiga
tion is made and report submitted.
"Second—The investigation to be
conducted as a matter of course by
the commission without the formality
of a request from either party.
"Third—The report to be submitted
within a given time, the time to bo
agreed upon.
"Fourth—The parties to reserve the
right to act independently on the
subject matter in dispute after the
report is submitted.
"The composition of the commis
sion was a matter of detail to be
agreed upon by the contracting par
ties. The time, also, in which the re
port should be submitted was a mat
ter of detail to be agreed upon by the
contracting parties.
"Eight nations have up to this time
responded favorably to the principle
and asking that suggestions be sub
mitted in regard to the details, others
replying that the proposition is re
ceived sympathetically and expressing
a willingness to consider the details.
The nations, in the order in which
they have accepted, are:
"Italy, Great Britain, France, Bra
zil, Sweden, Norway, Peru and Rus
sia.'"
APPROVESPROBERESOLUTION
Senate Provides for Inquiry Into West
Virginia Mine Strike.
Washington, May 28.—By a viva
voce vote the senate passed tbe reso
lution authorizing a sweeping investi
gation of conditions preceding and ac
companying tbe strike of coal miners
in the Paint creek region in West Vir
ginia.
Under the resolution's authority the
senate, through the education and la
bor committee, will look into the
charges of peonage in West Virginia,
of violation of the immigration laws,
of Interference with mails and postof
fices and of violation of the Consti
tution and laws of the United States
in the trial of citizens by a military
tribunal.
HOLD PELKEY AND BURNS
Canadian Authorities Accuse Them of
Manslaughter.
Calgary, Alta., May 28.—Both Tom
my Burns and Arthur Pelkey have
been committed to stand trial for man
slaughter in connection with the
death of Luther McCarty.
Both are released on bail of 110,000.
Tbe case likely will not come up un
til October.
Gibson Jury Disagrees.
Newburgh, N. Y., May 80.—The jury
in the case of Burton W. Gibson, after
deliberating for nearly twenty-five
hours, was discharged, being unable
to agree as to his guilt on a charge
»f murdering Mrs. Rosa Menschife
Szabo. At a previous trial the jury
was unable to agrees.
British Army Aviator Killed.
Montrose, Scotland. May 28.—Lieu
tenant Desmond Arthur of the royal
flying corps of the British army waa
killed when his aeroplane turned tur
tle and crashed to earth from a great
•eight ^.^.jm
iu

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