OCR Interpretation


New Ulm review. (New Ulm, Brown County, Minn.) 1892-1961, August 06, 1913, Image 2

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89081128/1913-08-06/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

5
WfWW^1^
New Ulm Review
Wednesday, August 6,1913
TNB. u. A.PRITSCHE
PHYSICIAN SURGEON
SOffioe over Brown Co. Bank.
G. F. BEINEKE, M. D.
1 Specialist in Diseases
of the
lye Ear, Note and Throat.
OFFICE HOURS
10 to 12 A. M. and 1 to 5 P. M.
Offloe in the Olsen Block.
Residence, 622 Center. New Ulm, Minn.
7 7
goMSEN, DEMPSEY, & MUELLER
t, ATTORNEYS & COUN-
SELORS.
Practice, in all State and U. 8. courts
KBW ULM, Mn"*-
A LBERT STEINHAUSER
ATTORNEY AT LAW
Office over Review.
Special attention given to probating
Estates. Practices in all Courts
of the State and S. Court.
BewUlm, Minn.
M. A. BINGHAM. A. W. BINOHAM.
Bingham Bros
DKALKRS IN
DKALK
NEW ULM MINN.
GULDEN & HIPPERT
PLUMBERS
All kinds of plumbing and fitting
in first class Manner. Estimates
furnished. All work guaranteed.
Before placing your work, it will be
for yonr interest to consult us.
414 Second North Str. Tel. 24"
William Pfaender Agency
General Insurance
Insurance against fire, hail, tornado,
automobile, accident and death, in
the best of companies.
Real estate bought and sold.
Legal documents executed, loans
negotiated, steamship tickets sold
CHAS. EMMERICH
PLUMBER
STEAM AND HOT WATER HEATING
GAS FITTING.
We are prepared to do all kinds of
plumbing in a first-class manner Do
not fail to call upon us when plumb
ers' services are required.
Minn, and Center Sts.
Phone 281 New Ulm
JUST THINK
OF IT
No Ashes,
No Clinkers,
No Soot.
Petroleum Carbon
Coke
$9.00 Per Ton
E NflGE
Exclusive Agent.
£H? Your Backache
and Rheumatism
WITH
FOLE KIDNE PILL
S
Backache drags on your vitality. Saps
your strength. Weakens your endurance.
Hampers you in yourwork.
Besides that, it meanssome
thing wrong with your,
kidneys a weakness, an
inflammation, a breaking:
down, may be, of thekidney
tissues. Foley Kidney Pitis
is the true answer. They
will help you QUICKLY,
strengthen and heal your
kidneys, regulate the action
of your bladder, and drive
Out Backache and Rheumatism. They
will make a strong, well man of you.
No habit forming drugs. Try them*
O. M. OLSEN.
OVER 65 YEARS'
EXPERIENCE
JOHN P. MITCHEL
Nominated for Mayor of
New York on Fusion Ticket
New York, Aug. 2.—John P. Mitchel,
collector of the port of New York, was
nominated for mayor of this city on
the fusion ticket by the fusion com
mittee of 107 shortly before 2:20
o'clock in the morning. Mr. Mitchel
received 45 votes to 43 for Charles S.
Whitman, district attorney of New
York county. The nomination of Mr.
Mitchel was afterwards made unani
mous.
HANNAFORD TO HEAD
NORTHERN PACIFIC
dough to Be Chairman Board
ol Directors.
New York, Aug. 2.—William I'.
Clough, first vice president and a mem
ber of the executive committee, is to
be the successor of Howard Elliott as
head of the Northern Pacific railroad,
according to authoritative announce
ment in Wall street.
Instead of being president, how
ever, he will become chairman of the
board of directors, a new position
soon to be created, following the ex
ample set by the New York, New Ha\
en and_Hartford in methods of railroad
administration.
The office of president will be hlled,
it is said, by J. M. Hannaford, now
second vice president.
1913 AUGUST 191
3
W
101
1
Chicago
TRADE MARKS
DESIGNS
COPYRIGHTS AC.
Anyone sending a sketch and description may
Quickly ascertain onr opinion free whether an
invention is probably patentable. Communica
tions strictly conlldentlaJ. HANDBOOK on Patents
sent free. Oldest acency forsecunnepatents.
Patents taken torough Blunn A Co. receive
tptcial notice, withou charge, in the
Scientifict American.
A handsomely tllnKtTsied weekly. Largest cir
culation of any scientific Journal. Terms. S3 a
year: four months, $1. Sold byall newsdealers.
MUNN S Co.36,B~»-«' New York
Branch Office. G25 SU WasbiBston. D.
1
tiff »*w*t«
S
1
8
1213141516
17181920212223
%l25B6tt7282930
GRAIN AND PROVISION PRICES
Duluth Wheat and Flax.
Duluth, Aug. 4.—Wheat—On track
and to arrive, No. 1 hard, 90%c No.
1 Northern, 89%c No. 2 Northern,
"•7%@88c Sept., 89%c Dec, 91%@
91-ac. Flax—On track and to arrive,
$1.41% Sept., $1.42% Oct, $1.42%.
South St. Paul Live Stock.
South St. Paul, Aug. 4—Cattle
Steers, $6.50f£8.25 cows and heifers,
$4.50® 7.00 calves, [email protected] feed
ers, [email protected] Hogs—$8 [email protected] 8.60.
Sheep—Shorn lambs, [email protected]:
shorn wethers, $4.00 4 50 shorn
ewes, [email protected]
Grain and Provisions.
Aug. 4.—Wheat—Sept.,
91%@!n%c. Corn—Sept.,
Dec, 66%c. Oats—Sept.,
44%c. Pork—Sept., $20.
25%@263,£c.
Chicago.
88'6c Dec,
69%@69%c
52%c Dec
90. Butter--Creameries,
Eggs—15c.
springs, 17c
Poultry—Hens, 13%c
turkeys, 19c.
Minneapolis Grain.
Minneapolis, Aug. 4.—Wheat—Sept.,
87%@87%c Dec, 90%c. Cash close
on track: No. 1 hard, 90ftc No. 1
Northern, 88%@89%c to arrive,
89%c No. 2 Northern, 86%@87%c
No. 3 Northern, 84%(&86i4c No. 3
yellow corn, [email protected]%c No. 4 corn,
[email protected] No. 3 white oats, [email protected]%c
to arrive, 40^0 No. 3 oats, [email protected]
barley, 44©57c.
Chicago Live Stock.
Chicago, Aug. 4.—Cattle—Beeves,
[email protected] 10 Texas steers, $6.75g7.80
Western steers, [email protected] stockers
and feeders, $5.30® 7.80 cows and
heifers, [email protected] calves, |[email protected]
$10.75. Hogs—Light. [email protected] mix
ed, [email protected] heavy, $8 2n§9.1o
rough, [email protected] pigs. $6.00§ 8.85
Sheep—Native, $4.15^5.25 y«arlings,
$5 [email protected] lambs, [email protected]
ABOUT THE STAT
Mi
Hews of Especial Interest to
DOCK CRASH FATAL TO FOUR
-'A*
Accidsnt at ths Head of ths Lakss
Said to Be Due to Carelessness
of Switching Crew.
V-
Two men are* known, to have' been
killed, two are'fatalljr injured, four
were seriously hurt and five are said
by the workmen to be unaccounted
for as the result of a collision of ore
trains at the Allouez ore docks. The
company contends that only two were
killed. After the accident the 500
men employed on the docks went on
strike, demanding a change in condi
tions to prevent a recurrence of the
disaster.
Nick Libest and John Koski, labor
ers, of Superior, are the dead.
Isaac Isei, laborer, leg cut*off and
an unidentified man, laborer, leg and
arm cut off, cannot live.
The accident is blamed to careless
switching. A moving ore train ran
into a standing train, throwing the
workmen into ore pockets and cover
ing them with ore.
FLOOD OF REFUND CLAIMS
Secretary of Minnesota Railroad Com*
mission Nearly Swamped.
Claims of many thousands of ship
pers tor refunds of overcharges dur
ing the period of railroad rate litiga
tion are pouring into the office of the
state railroad and warehouse commis
sion, and Assistant Secretary Thomas
Yapp is having difficulty in arranging
them for presentation to the roads.
,In many cases the claims are for in
terstate shipments. It has been dis
tinctly ruled that no refunds on this
class of freight can be made. It is
only for shipments entirely within the
state that the supreme court ruling
applies, and the interstate rates were
not directly affected by the decree in
the Minnesota case.
The commission is making every ef
fort to secure prompt action on the
part of the railroads on all claims
filed, and it has been assured by offi
cials of the various lines affected that
arrangements are now being perfect
ed so that the refunds due can be
quickly and amicably adjusted.
FATAL CAVE1N AT ANOKA
Victims Caught in Trench When
Walls Collapse.
One man was killed, five were in
jured, one so seriously he may die,
and twenty or more narrowly escaped
when the walls of an excavation being
made to install a new boiler in the
state asylum for the insane at Anoka
caved in.
Scores of workmen dug frantically
in the ruins in the hope that the one
man, caught beneath more than a ton
of cement and mortar that fell into
the exca\ation, might be taken out
alive. His body was found crushed.
More than twenty men had been
employed digging a deep trench to
the boiler room of the asylum.
Those in it were working near the
building when suddenly one wall
caved in. John Johnson, who was
killed, was directly beneath the ava
lanche. Albin Rydquist. who was prob
ably fatally injured, was caught and
almost buried. The others were struck
with pieces of falling cement, but
managed to extricate themselves and
then rescue Rydquist.
TANK FALLS THROUGH STORE
Mankato Man Buried Under Tons of
Debris.
More than twenty workmen nar
rowly escaped death, one was buried
for two hours beneath tons of debm
and the Patterson Mercantile com
pany's four-story building at Mankato
was damaged to the extent of $40,000
when a steel water tank, containing
15,000 gallons, fell through the build
ing.
The tank tore through one corner
of the building, carrying boxes of gro
ceries and other stock with it.
The debris and one end of the tank
stri-. squarely on top of Gomer Jones'
motorcycle store, in which two me
chanics were working.
One of the men, Ernest L. Skoog,
was trapped under fifteen feet of brick,
mortar and boxed goods. A crowd
gathered and scores of men went to
work to dig bun out.
When taken out it was found that
both Skoog's legs were fractured. It
is thought he will recover.
•$.*4. 4*+ 4- '!"fr*
PULMOTOR SAVES CHILD.
Minneapolis, July 31.—A
newly-born baby girl, daughter
of Mrs. William Cummings,
was saved from death at the
city hospital by the use of the
pulmotor. The little girl was
born apparently lifeless. Dr. Ed
mund Smith, hospital staff phy
sician, applied the pulmotor for
twenty minutes. Then the child
was breathing normally. It is
believed she will live A twin
brother was born at the same
time.
4"fr4* 4- 'i-4'"t-
vw$7M%*7(i~ r, $ *rr«r'./'*w*
FRED D. SHERMAN.
Commissioner of Immigration
for ths Stats of Minnesota.
OF GREAT VALUE TO STATE
Minnesota Subject of Laudatory Arti
cles in Eastern Magazines.
The state of Minnesota Is getting
some valuable advertising at the pres
ent time in some of the largest East
ern magazines. A recent issue of The
Country Gentleman, an agricultural
paper of national circulation, contain
ed an editorial which gave the Min
nesota state board of immigration
much publicity, and at the same time
called public attention to the re
sources and opportunities of Minneso
ta. In this article The Country Gentle
man mentioned the fact that Minneso-*
ta has approximately 27,000,000 acres
of undeveloped lands capable of pro
viding 165,000 farms of 160 acres
each. It also quotes the price of
Minnesota lands, which range from $8
per acre for wild land to $125 for
highly improved farms.
The Youths Companion of July 17
published an editorial highly compli
mentary of Minnesota and pointed out
the fact that Minnesota bad wisely
bandied her state lands, so that today
she has a permanent trust fund of
over $29,000,000 and will have in 1950
a fund of $200,000,000. Articles of this
character, appearing in such largely,
circulated papers, are of incalculable
value to Minnesota. As a result of
this publicity many inquiries are be
ing received by the state board of im
migration asking about Minnesota's
landB and opportunities.
Fred D. Sherman, the commissioner
of immigration, is preparing a series
of articles on Minnesota which will
appear from time to time in several
Eastern magazines.
WESTON AT END
OF LONG WALK
Arrives at Minneapolis After
Hiking 1,600 Miles.
When Edward Peyton Weston, the
aged pedestrian, ended his long jour
ney on foot from New York to Minne
apolis he was accompanied by an es
cort in which Governor Eberhart and
Mayor WT. S. Nye of Minneapolis were
two notable figures.
Both the governor and Mayor Nye
set out briskly from St. Paul, keeping
pace with the noted old hiker. They
kept the pace until they reached the
city limits Here they entered auto
mobiles.
The enthusiasm of the St. Paulites
who were in the party with Weston
held firm until the hikers were well in
the Midway district. Here a few
began to drop out, but others took
their places at every block.
Minneapolis downtown streets were
jammed when Weston strode up Nicol
let avenue and ended his 1,600-mile
walk. Weston immediately laid the
mortar on the corner stone of the
new Minneapolis Athletic club's build
ing.
The crowd was immense. Hours
before Weston was due to reach Min
neapolis the curbs along his route
•were lined with people. His course
was a continuous ovation. Frequent
ly the crowds pushed beyond police
lines, and the walker was forced out
of his stride. Whistles and cheers
added to the din.
Weston started the morning of June
2 from the steps of the College of
the City of New York and has walked
in the sixty days an average of thir
ty-three miles a day and as much as
forty-five miles some days.
INJURES WIFE KILLS SELF
St Paul Man Becomes Temporarily
Insane.
While their two children struggled
to prevent him, Joseph Schroepffer,
a contractor of St. Paul, struck
his wife on the head with a hammer,
then fled to the barn in the rear of
their home and committed suicide. It
Is believed Schroepffer was tempo
rarily deranged.
The woman was taken to the city
hospital by Police Surgeon Schnacke.
Her recovery is expected.
it
r^ff/ZIT^^ *l" 5
Phone 101
Western Land Securities Co.
Home Office, 213 Gilfillan Block, St. Paul, Minn.
Buy Land in the Upper
Peninsula of flichigan
Buy a farm now where farming pays in Cloverland, we
have without question tjie best low priced land.proposition,
now open to settlement in the United States. 500,000 acre*,
for sale in large or small tracts, at only $20.00 per acre for
first choice and twenty years topay for it. No one ques
tions the advancement in agriculture and stock raising ID
these localities. The conditions for fanning are most favor
able. Rains are well distributed throughout the year and
crop failures are unknown. The soil, in fact, is of sncb
variety as to satisfy any landseeker. MUCK BEDS, CLA
LOAMS, BLACK PRAIRIE SOIL, all these can be foiind
and each has its value in the different lines of dairyingjnnt
laising, gardening or grain growing. The climate is ideal
owing to the proximity of Lake Superior and Lake Michigan,,
none of our land being over thirty miles from the big lakes.
Crops, that have been grown show wonderful yields—
OATS, 109 bu. per acre. FLAX, 28 bu. per acre. CLOVERr
three tons per acre. TIMOTHY, 2 to 3 tons per acre.
FALL WHEAT, 46 bu. per acre. Close to good markets
with excellent shipping facilities ineluding boat freight to ali
cities located on the big lakes, thus insuring by close com
petition,
LOW FREIGHT RATES
Fruits thrive here—Berries and Cherries reach perfec
tion. Apples hold the worlds prize, granted at the Chicago
Land Show in 1912.
This is the OPPORTUNITY of the present time never to
be excelled. You cannot fail if you grasp the situation im
mediately. Come and see this land for yourself.
O. H. OSMUNDSEN,
Camping, Tramping Time
IS HERE
No tramping trip should be made
without a compass and no camp
ing outing is successful without
^ood, wholesome* bread, the kind
that is made from our
COMPASS FLOUR
The New Ulm Roller Mill"
A Well-Kept Lawn
Why not discard the old mower which has
served it's time and get one that runs smoothly,
cuts easily and evenly, makes but little noise
and makes your work a real pleasure?
We will be pleased to have you look over
our stock of tools for use on the lawn, such as
hose, nozzles, sprinklers, grass hooks, rakes,
shears, etc. We believe we can please you in
price as well as quality and assortment.
New Ulm Hardware Co.
JOB WORK IN THE CITY.
AT THE NEW ULM PUBLISHING OO.
BUY THE BEST
SINGER SEWINC MACHINES
At the NEW ULM MUSIC STORE. Repairing done
promptly. Can supply repairs for all makes
of machines.
O. H. HAUSER. Dist, Agt»
i-r I 1
Cen'l Aet.
New Ulm, Minn.
$
Mi

xml | txt