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New Ulm review. (New Ulm, Brown County, Minn.) 1892-1961, September 05, 1917, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89081128/1917-09-05/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOLUME XL.
"is
EXAMINATIONS FOR
**MST DRAFT END
ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY-
TWO MEN ACCEPTED BY
•J*
4 BOARD.
FIFTY-TWO MORE ARE READY
TO BE PASSED UPON AT
ONCE.
\y The Brown County Exemption board
rV has completed the examinations for
the first draft, 172 men having been ac
cepted for the army. These have not
been passed upon by the district board
at Mankato, and some of them may be
further eliminated. To make sure that
there will be enuf to fill the quota,
case any number of the men accepted by
the county board are exempted by the
district organization, fifty-two more
had been acted upon when the Review
went to press. They probably will be
today.
Local Men Not Called.
Sheriff W. J. Julius, chairman of the
board, Monday received a telegram from
Governor J. A. A. Burnvuist, saying
that none of the Brown county drafted
men would be called out today £s had
been expected, and to make no provision
along that line until further notice. It
k. j|hal been announced that an advance
*V "^iguard of 5 per cent of the drafted men
be sent away on September 5,
rat for some reason this plan has evi
dently been changed.
N
Those who have been examined and
will not be included in the first draft
will probably come in on the second call
without further examination, altho no
official announcemnet to that effect has
yet been made.
Those Who Are Accepted.
The following have been accepted
since the publication oj previous list:
1729 Edward Schieffert, Sleepy Eye.
1187 Alva Rpsecrans, Sleepy Eye.
««5/
753 Arthur E«Hansen, Hanska.
%4 168 Harry Brand, New Ulm.
1774 Clifford Simmons, Comfrey
1511 Jos. J. Schwaegerl, Springfield.
1188 Alphons Ruffing, Sleepy Eye.
911 Edward Keim, Hanska.
1517 John Wersal, Comfrey.
49 John Rewitzer, New Ulm.
1160 Mike Weiss, Sleepy Eye.
1192 Milton C. Sasse, Sleepy Eye.
143 Ferdinand Steinhaus, Morgan.
557 Geo. N. Wmdschitl, Sleepy Eye.
1464 Edward Haber, New Ulm.
857 Edwin A. Mogensen, Evan.
1554 Walter Gould, Springfield.
357 Arthur C. Wmdhorn, New Ulm.
1173 George P. Schmid, Sleepy Eye.
492 Frank Peehtl, Sleepy Eye.
565 Peter J. Guldan, Sleepy Eye.
1447 Milton Essig, New Ulm.
1049 Alfred A. Hamann, Searles.
349 Frank Schaefer, New Ulm.
1407 Bernhard Johnson, Hanska.
875 Elvm G. Hagen, St. James.
The Ones Exempted.
The following have been exempted by
the local board.
121 Thorbjorn J. Smlsberg, New Ulm.
221 Charles H. Nicklaus, New Ulm.
1537 Joseph G. Fischer, Comfrey. —.
1474 Ludwig Wandersee, New Ulm.
1414 Elmer W. Gebhard, New Ulm.
*& 1616 George H. Hartwig, Evan.
292 Frank Macho, New Ulm.
504 Joseph F. Savoy, Sleepy Eye.
1064 Alfred H. Fritsche, New Ulm.
1205 Andrew C. Rasmussen, Sleepy Eye.
1510 Otto Riederer, Springfield.
1091 Louis P. Sorenson, Evan.
470 William J. Hoss. Jr., New Ulm.
312 Charles A. Amann, New Ulm.
1284 Otto Tauer, Hanska.
90 William Backer, New Ulm.
191 Emil G. Berg, New Ulm.
477 Morris Benzuly, Sleepy Eye.
1179 Royce H. Keyes, Sleepy Eye.
130 Frank J. Baier, JTr., New Ulm.
424 George Dietz, Jr. New Ulm.
840 Henry Sholtz, Comfrey.
1347 William Febinger, Sleepy Eye.
657 Percy M. Bott,. Springfield.
175 Walter R. Schleuder, New Ulm.
300 Clemence J. Hegler, New Ulm.
278 Gust. H. Doose, New Ulm.
1622 George F. Stroup, Sleepy Eye.
1240 Peder R. Paulson, Hanska.
524 William Allen, Sleepy Eye.
1172 Joseph Battes, Sleepy Eye.
532 P. Joseph Cassidy, Sleepy Eye.
1139 Herman Rossow, Morgan.
1214 Nicholas P. Maurer, Sleepy Eye.
336 Ernst Pfeiffer, New Ulm.
1357 Anton Bakken, Hanska.
If 8 F. Wm. Pfeif£er, New Ulm.
1707 Even R. Owens, Sleepy Eye.
1660 Albert H. Baumann, New Ulm.
1652 George Dauer, New Ulm.
1640 Edward Helget, Sleepy Eye.
1798 William K. Polkow, Springfield.
585 Conrad H. Stern, Sleepy Eye.
{Continued on page 2 col
J%.
INTOXICATED LAMBERTON M^
•V MAN PAYS FOR CAR RIDE
James McCortney Gets Off With
Fine of Fifty Dollars.
James McCortney of Lamberton.ac
companied by his wife and a neighbor
and his wife, came to NewsUlmto attend
the fan*. The fhend and the two women
attended the show, but McCortney pre
ferred to hang around town and get
drunk. When it came time for the party
to leave for home McCortney was too
intoxicated to drive his car, and Mrs.
McCortney requested that their friend
take charge. To this McCortney stren
uously objected and a quarrel ensued.
During the squabble Policeman John
Herzog interfered and ordefed the other
man, whose name is not known here, to
take charge of the car during the journey
to Lamberton. When a distance of about
a mile from town MCortney again be
came insistent that he do the driving.
As a result the man and the two women
walked back to town and took the night
train for home.
McCortney, left to his own distraction,
lost his way, became confused as to the
direction, turned about and later in
the evening was found by the police
headed toward St. Peter, with his car
the ditch. He was taken to jail, and
Wednesday arraigned before Justice
George Hogen, charged with driving a
car while intoxicated. He plead guilty,
but begged so piteously that his license
be not revoked that Justice Hogen let
him off with a fine of $50 and costs.
LOYALTY MEETING
IS GREAT SUCCESS
THOUSANDS GATHER IN CITY
TO HEAR GOVERNOR BURN.
QUIST'S TALK.
BANQUET IS TENDERED THE
DRAFTED MEN FROM BROWN
COUNTY.
1
The date and time set for the farewell
banquet to the Brown county drafted
boys, and for the loyalty meeting follow
ing, prevents the Review from giving a
detailed account of the affair, which at
this writing premises to be a great
success, from every point of view. The
weather was all that the promoters
had dreamed, the town was profuse
ly decorated and there premised to be a
very large crowd, ccming from many
parts of this section of Southern Minne
sota.
The crowd, which gathered in the
Court House square, was presided over
by Judge I. M. Olsen, and the address
of welcome was delivered by Fred W.
Johnson. Governor J. A. A. Burn
quist was the principal speaker of the
evening, while addresses were also de
livered by Julius A. Coller of Shakopee,
Senator Julius E. Haycraft of Fairmont,
and Senator Frank Clague of Redwood
Falls.
Several bands, including the Hof
meister's and a number from other points
were in the parade,
The banquet to the departing drafted
and enlisted men, who have not gone to
the front, or been called out, was sej ved
at the Armory, the ladies of the New
Ulm Chapter of the Red Cross being in
charge. It was arranged under the
auspices of the Commercial club.
The order of march for the parade
was headed as follows:
The Red Cross leading, and delegations
from the various towns in line. New
Ulm, first Sleepy Eye, Springfield,
Hanska, Comfrey, Mankato, Redwood
Falls, St. Peter, Madeha, Olivia, Lamber
ton, Fairfax, Morgan, Lafayette,
'The- Hofmeister Family Orchestra
furnished the music at the banquet. The
ball was handsomely decorated with
flags and bunting.
RED CROSS CHAPTER IS
ORGANIZED AT HANSKA
A chapter of the Red Cross was or
ganized at Hanska, at an enthusiastic
meeting held in that village last Satur
day evening. The new organization
starts out with a good sized member*
ship. Addresses were made by F. W.
Johnson, president Mrs.41. L. Beecher,
secretary of the New Ulm chapter, and
several others. Committees were ap
pointed and the necessary steps taken
for a permanent organization. Another
meeting will be held soon, when the
officers will be elected.
Those who attended from New Ulm
and assisted in forming the chapter,
were the following: Mr. and Mrs., H.
KM fe«.#'r.bas
son, Mrs. E. G. Hage and Mrs. James
Garrow.
INTERESTING TALE
OF THE RED CROSS
FORMER SCHOOL TEACHER OF
NEW ULM SPEAKS AT THE
ARMORY.
Or*
MRS.
THORPE
The accomplishments of the Red Cross
in the war, and what it means to every
boy or man who is called out to fight, were
vividly described in an address-delivered
before a fair sized audience at the Armory
Friday evening, by Mrs. George C. Thorpe
of Washington, D. C. Mrs. Thorpe,
who is the wife of Lieutenant Colonel
Thorpe of the United States army, was
twelve years ago a teacher in the public
schools of New Ulm, her name then being
Miss Cora Wells. For the past two years
Mrs. Thorpe has been engaged in Red
Cross work, and has lectured in behalf
of that organization, more recently in
various towns in Minnesota. The ad
dress here was under the auspices of the
New Ulm Fed Cross chapter.
Red Cross Work Described.
Mrs. Thorpe described the work cf
the soldiers the first, second and third
line trenches, and how the wounded are
carried thru tunnels from the trenches
to retreats where the first aid is given
from there to the Evacuation hospital,
and trom there to the Base hospitals,
which are under the absolute control of
the Red Cross, and where all sick and:
wounded soldiers are treated and cared
for until able to return to the battle
fields or are sent home. In the first
hospital the men who are found to be only
slightly wounded are given care until
they are able to return to the trenches.
All Treated Alike.
All sick or wounded, whether friend
or enemy are given equal treatment
in the Red Cross hospitals. This is one
underlying principles of
ganization.r ~^l "&*•**
KEW ULM, BROWN COUNTY, MINNESOTA, WEDNESDAY!*SEPT. 5, 1917.
-•^E.
TELLS OF THE
WORK ACCOMPLISHED
FOR SOLDIERS.
tfcat^Qi-35hat
Mrs. Thorpe told of the needs* of the
Red Cross. One of the most important
at the present time is bandages. For
the lack of these many lives are lost,
the speaker declared. The society is
also need of many more ambulances
than are now to be had. She told how
a whole regiment of men, overcome by
gas had died because they could not be
taken to a hospital in time, for the lack
of motor ambulences.
She closed by making an appeal to the
men and women of New Ulm to forget,
for the time being, why we are at war,
or when it will end, but to bend every
effort to aid in making the lives of those
who go, many of whom wril be from
Brown county, as easy as possible.
Talks From Shoulder.
The speaker was introduced by Presi
dent F. W. Johnson of the local Red
Cress organization, who deplored the
fact that there was not a larger audience.
He said the comparatively small atten
dance was a disappointment to those
who were devoting their time and ener
gies to the work. Mr. Johnson called
attention to the fact that there are now
some 600 members of the society in this
city, and that many women are meeting
daily_ at the Armory, where they ate
sewing and knitting, making all sorts
of comforts for the boys who will soon
be in the trenches or in training camps
in this country.
"The time is past," said Mr. Johnson,
"when we can discuss the cause which has
lead to the war. The fact simply re
mains that we are at war, and it is our
duty to dosthe best that we can to make
the burden of those who go as light as
possible. It is the duty of every man
and woman in New Ulm and elsewhere
to do as much as, possible for the Red
Cross. When you help the Red Cross
you are helping our own Brown county
and New Ulm boys, who are or will
be at the front."
s~
MAY BE Itf FRANCE SOON
Dr. A. V. Seifert, or Lieutenant
Seifert, if you please, will leave today
to report to the division commander,
Umted States Army, at Camp Mills,
Long Island, N. Y. Lieutenant Seifert
said yesterday that he rather expects he
will be sent to France at once. His
reason for this belief is the fact that
his order reads to report to the com
mander of the Forty-Second divi
sion, which has been designated as
the ones to cross, the pond at once, and
which will include, the First,Minnesota
Artillery. Lieutenant Seifert- says he
b^n^ormed that ^officers-will
le snips, wf",
will be sent in transports.
privates
INTOXICATED MWm
CAN'T RUN AUTOS
if
3 tr
LIApLErTO FINE ANEKCANCEL
LATI6N OF" LICENSE WHEN
4t
CONVICTED
NEW LAW MAKES SUCH ACTION
BY COURTS ABSOLUTELY
IMPERATIVE.
"Whoever operates a motor vehicle
"while in an intoxicated condition shall
be guilty of a misdemeanor/*"
"Provided that any person convicted
under -this section shall forfeit any li
cense which he may have to operate a
motor vehicle under the laws of this
state, and shall 'also be disqualified to
operate any motor vehicle for a period
of three months after the date of such
conviction, and provided further that
any violation of this provisison shall be
a misdemeanor."
New Law Is Drastic.
The above is a provision'added to the
automobile laws, passed during the last
session of the legislature and went into
effect on April 15. The law also pro
vides that a driver thus convicted is,
in addition to the forfeiture of his
license, liable to pay a fine of not less
than $25 nor more than $100. The
justice may also impose a straight jail
sentence, without the option of paying
a fine.
Complaints Are Numerous.
The reason for the drastic action of
the legislature is obvious. Not only in
this vicinity are the complaints of
serious accidents and narrow escapes
numerous. While there are occa
sional such instances here, they* are
much more frequent in other towns of
the state.
New Ulm Law-Abiding.
It must also be said for New Ulm
in nearly every instance theoffeftd
ing parties *afe from other* localities.
There is probably not a city anywhere™
which the citizens are more law-abiding
than in this city.
The following communication, signed
"A Citizen and Taxpayer," published
in the Lake Crystal Union, indicates
how intolerable conditions are that
vicinity and around Mankato:
"If you will grant me space I wish
to call the attention of the public to
the great danger that the people along
the highway leading out of Mankato
are being subjected to. With the au
tomobile'has sprung up an evil through
the excessive use of liquor that is en
dangering the lives of all who travel.
It is not an uncommon thing for an
automobile loaded with men- who have
visited Mankato and have become in
toxicated by the use of too much liquor
to drive through our city or on some
other country road, at a high rate of
speed compelling other travelers to get
into the ditch to save their families and
themselves from instant death. Will
we, as America citizens, straining every
nerve to provide for the great emergency
that is now upon us allow these people
to not only spend their time and money,
but interfere with the peaceful pursuits
of citizens who are trying to do their bit
this great conflict? It lies within our
power to eliminate this great evil at
once and I hope to hear this subject
being discussed by every American
citizen in our city and through the
columns of our neighbor newspapers.
Several accidents have recently occurred
and it is a disgrace for the citizens of
Blue Earth county to allow it to con
tinue."
SHERIFF STOPS MEETING
OF COURTLAND CITIZENS
Friday evening about one hundred
of the voters of Courtland Township
met at the Swan Lake school-house for
the purpose of organizing a local of the
"People's Council for Democracy and
Peace." About the time they were
ready to open the meeting Sheriff August
Olson, a St. Peter policeman and a party
from Courtland village appeared upon
the scene and the Sheriff told those
present that he had orders from the
Governor, the Attorney-General and the
Public Safety Commission to prevent
meetings of this character and practi
cally ordered them to disperse.
Rather than have a row, the people
quietly dispersed and the first attempt
to organize a local in Courtland Town
sgip has railed, but this uncalled ior
violation* of the constitutional ijjghtsof
the people has- in no/ way (faMp^e^^
ardor o£
thevoterirof
DEPARTING SOLDIERS ARE
GIVEN HEARTY FAREWELL
Knights of Columbus Officers En
tertain Young Men.
*s«r«aMSwsr^ mem «&
New Ulm soldiers, who are members
the of local court, Knights of Columbus,
were 'given a farewell dinner and recep
tion by the officers of that orgamzjation
Monday evening. The guests of honor
were: Dr. A. C. Amann, Dr. A. F.
Groebner, Dr. A. V. Seifert, John Chris
topherson and Adolph Amann. The
three former have enlisted in the dental
reserve corps, medical department of
the army, while the two latter have been
drafted. All expect,soon to be called
to the colors and are liable to leave
at any time.
The dinner was served at the Dakota
HoteL and besides the guests of honor
there were present the following officers
of the court: Grand Knight Henry J.
Berg, William A. Pfefferle, Leo Schiller,
Frank Kosch and Ed. Berg.
Following the dinner the party re
paired to the residence of Grand Knight
Berg, where the members were royally
entertained by the county treasurer
and his wife. The evening was spent
in playing cards, visiting and in various
forms of amusement.
The event was one to be remembered
as one of the bright spots in New Ulm
by the departing soldier boys after they
have reached the trenches of France.
.y
BIG CLASS GOING
TO BE INITIATED
LOCAL KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS
WILL BE ENTERTAINED BY
LOCAL MEN.
MYSTERIES OF ORDER TO BE
IMPARTED TO MANY CANDI
DATES, lg.:
With eighty-nine* candidates-the local
council, Knights of Columbus, will ini
tiate the largest class in its history at
the New Ulm Armory, next Sunday,
September 9. There are expected to be
between 600 and 700 members of the or
der present to witness the ceremony
and to attend the banquet which will be
served in the evening.
Initiations All Day.
The initiation ceremonies will begin
immediately following mass at the Catho
lic church in the morning. The first
and second degrees will be worked by
the local team, while the candidates wjll
be put thru their paces in the third by
the crack team from La Crosse, Wis.
It is expected that it will be about
6 o'clock or 6:30 in the evening when the
work of the degree teams has been com
pleted, and then an important part of the
program will be begun.
A banquet will be served in the dining
room of the Armory following initiations,
at which it is expected that more than
600 covers will be placed. Rev. Robert
Schlinkert will be toastmaster, and ad
dresses will be made by Hon. A. H.
Schubert of La Crosse Rev. J.tL. O'Con
ner of Worthington Rev. Joseph Mor
gan of Pipestone, and others, whose
names have not yet been made public.
Committee Hard at Wosk.
The arrangements committee has been
at work for some time preparing for the
event, which is expected to be the largest
ever attempted in this part of the"state.
County Treasurer H. J. Berg is the
Grand Knight of St. Patrick Council, and
under his guiding hand, and with the
enthusiasm that he has injected into
the work the council is one of the many
strong organizations of New Ulm and
of Southern Minnesota.
The election of officers of St Patrick
CouncU will be held at the hall in the
Catholic school building on Monday
evening, September 10.
a
AUTO TOURISTS COMING «.
Jr
Courtland wbi
beUcsvein Fea^a^d^emaqracy.^
•4*
A letter was received Thursday" hy
Harry Bingham, who was secretary of
the New Ulm Automobile club, when
this city boasted of such an organization,
from Amboy, Minn., saying that an
automobile trip was contemplated by
a number of the automobile club to
New Ulm, and asked if it would be
possible for the visitors to use either of
the parks for a picnic while in the city.
The letter was turned over to Presi
dent G. A. Ottomeyer, who after con
sulting members of the park board,
notified the Amboy people by telephone
that they would be welcome to the use
Thembr^d^ not state when they would
arrive.-VlF
NUMBEK36
COUNTY FAIR O fe
OUT AHEAD IN GASH
V$
WMtM
NEW VENTURE IN ENTERTAIN.
MENT^f ROVES FINANCIAL
OFFICERS AREjWELL PLEASED
WITH RESULT^OF THE 1917
-»7 V£wJ2k* SHOW.
The countytfair has comeanofgohefor
another year, and the officers'of the
Brown County Agricultural society are
well pleased with the results of the big
show of 1917. There were larger crowds
at each day's session, and every one was
apparently better satisfied with what he
saw than ever before. The society
members are satisfied that the people
want ssomething besides cheap horse
races, and similar entertamiment at
the county fairs, and the contention
of the officers that there was a demand
for a different and better class of features
has been sustained by the totals of the
gate receipts.
Tuesday's attendance is said to have
been three times greater than on any
similar day of the ^air in years past,
when there were more than 4,000 people
on the grounds during the day and
evening.
There was some disappointement on
the part of the visitors Tuesday, owing
to the lateness of the day in which the
aeroplane artist got around to make his
flight, and some from a distance were
obliged to leave without seeing this at
traction. The iojlowing day however,
he was given to understand that he
must get busy earlier in the afternoon
with the result that he ^gave a fairly
good flight at a more reasonable hour.
The balloon ascensions were exceptional
ly good especially. The vaudeville acts
were excellent and gave good satisjfajtioik
from beginning to end.
Now that the fair management has
a
Wad
on^ajaew tack m^e^aipggeBaent
and enfertaimrent line, it is like|y^hat
improvements will be made in the future..
Advertising Given Credit.
Secretary W. E. Englebert does not
give all of the credit for the success of
this year's fair to the unproved class of
amusements and .attractions, but says
the increased amount of advertising is
entilted to much of the credit.
"The success of this year's fair proves
what the right kind of attractions and
liberal judicious advertising will do."
said Mr. Engelbert, after he had finished
figuring up the receipts and profits.
The following is the table of receipts:f
Gate Receipts.
Sunday, ball game $93.75'
Tuesday afternoon 1,809.50
Tuesday evening 151.25
Wednesday afternoon 776.00
Wednesday evening 206.50
Total
Tuesday afternoon
Wednesday afternoon
Wednesday evening
Total
%i
"-"Si
$*5
*•&
•"'sS
$3,837,001
Grand Stand.
$105.75
54.00
26.50
$186.25,
Concessions.
Doll Stands
Refreshment Stands
$229.75
153.00
Tolal $383.75
Advance sale of tickets, about $265
Grand total $3,871.00
Mr. Engelbert says that when all ex
penses have been paid^there will be
a surplus of nearly""^ $1,500. In
years past the society has usually about
broken even. This is the first in many
years when there has been a surplus. 1
LOCAL CATHOLICS HOLD
HARVEST FESTIVAL HERE
The annual Harvest Festival washeldt
by members bf thefloly Trinity Catholic
church, Sunday.afternoon, at the Catho
lic Park. The proceedings began with,
a dinner served in the park, at which a
large number of people were present*
Following the dinner, which was given
by the ladies of the Catholic Order of
Foresters, there were various amuse
ments and games, and laarge crowd was
present during the entire afternoon.
Music was furnished by Hofmeister's
Band. The affair was pronounced an.
unqualified success by-all those present*
and also by the Lady Foresters, from
a financial point of view.
The ntw city well in North German
park has been completed and the con
tract for the pumping machinery will
soon be awarded. It is expected to be
the best of the four wjeDs which now
supplies the city with water.

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