OCR Interpretation


New Ulm review. (New Ulm, Brown County, Minn.) 1892-1961, April 05, 1922, Image 7

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89081128/1922-04-05/ed-1/seq-7/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 7

CHILD TRAINING.
I was in a barber's chair recently
when a young married man came in.
He is one of tfre kind called "a good
mixer" all of the barbers called him
by his first name. He told a few stories
loud enough so that everyone in the
shop could get, as he called it "an ear
ful." His only child is not very old
but when praising "the kid" nearly
every other word was mixed with pro
fanity in order to give, according to
his idea, greater force.
Finally one of the barbers asked him
if the child could swear as fluently
as his dad and I was simply dumbfound
ed at the expression of pride when he
told of how the little fellow had cussed
his grandmother the previous day.
Then one of the barbers told of his
little daughter who rode to and from
school dail in a bus. He boasted that
none of the boys who made the trip
daily with her, could "hold a candle
to her" in the line of profanity and he
seemed to think it showed brilliancy,
especially did he seem to think it very
smart when he told of how she would
swear at her mother when things did
not go to suit her.
Had I not known these men and their
badly trained children were the ex
treme exception and not the rule, I
could not have refrained from a most
emphatic expression of my opinion.
I realized, however, that to have
expostulated would have called down
a flood of profanity and the jeers of
the crowd, who, with but one exception
appeared to enjoy it all as a good joke.
The exception was the negro boot
black, who could not avoid an expres
sion of horror His children are regu
lar attendants at school and Sunday
School.
"Train up the child in the way he
should go and in his old age he will not
depart from it," is as true today as it
was two thousand years ago. The
responsibility of parents is great and
the training of the child must begin
in the parent. The famous Dr. Holmes
was once asked "When should the train
ing of a child begin" and he promptly
answered "At leas.t two hundred years
before it is born."
I wish that every young man and
every young woman could read the
articles which the famous Professor
Wigam has been writing for Physicala
Culture Magazine during the past year.
These articles give a clean cut
scientific basis for hereditary traits,
habits, characteristics and physical as
well as mental conditions of the off
spring.
Early training and environment may
jjwvatly change inherited tendencies but
the weakness or strength will reappear
in future generation and thus the good
that men and women do will live after
them. By first training yourself
OBITUARY
J. B. ARNOLD
J. B. Arnold of whose death men
tion was briefly made last week died
of anemia with which he had been a
sufferer for a number of years. De
spite his illness he followed his trade
sas tinsmith up to a few weeks previous
'to his death. John Bernard Arnold
was born in Germany in 1847 and
came to America with his parents
when he was two years of age, first lo
cating in Wisconsin. He came to
New Ulm in 1869 and shortly thereaf
ter entered into the hardware and
tinsmith business. In 1871 he was
united in marriage to Rose Wiede
mann who passed away in 1874. A-
,*-*.
HOME HEALTH CLUB
EDITED BV DAVID H. REEDER, LAPORTE, INDIANA
Eat More Bread
you can train your children into habits
of natural living and good morals.
The old saying was that many
children turn out to be a great disap
pointment to their parents but I like
the new way of putting it best. Many
parents turn out to be a great disap
pointment to their children.
CLUB NOTES.
MRS. J. H. T. of Iowa writes:
Dear Doctor Reeder: Did you ever
suffer with insomia and if so how did
you get relief? I am one of the vic
tims and if I owned one thousandth
part of the sheep I have counted I
would sell them all and give you a few
paltry million if you would cure me
Please tell me something to do besides
counting, for the more I count the far
ther away I get from sleep. Mother
says that just before time to get up
I curl up like a cat, quit counting and
kicking and sleep like a dead man.
ANSWER: It's a bit out of the
ordinary, but you have answered your
own question according to the most re
cent scientific discoveries in the thera
peutic field. A famous medical doctor
who had made more valuable dis
coveries than all the rest of us put to
gether wanted to find out why the
Ostheopathic physicians could cure
so many ailments which drugs would
not touch and he began to study the
spines. He secured a vast drove of
alley cats and experimented on their
spine. One of his discoveries, which
the ostheopaths have known for years,
is that when the spine is straight and
the head thrown back, the blood cir
culates rapidly through the brain
when the spine is slightly curved and
the head dropped forward the blood
leaves the brain.
See the point? When a kitten, a
dog, a child or almost any animal
wants to sleep it lies down in such a
manner the spine is circular and the
head dropped forward, all curled up
for a nap.
Any sudden noise or danger signal
causes the head to be thrown sharply
up and instantly the animal is wide
awake. The blood circulates rapidly
in the brain and it is ready for any
emergency.
Just curl up and quit your sheep
business don't worry about the sleep
but as soon as you wake up in the
morning throw your head up and
backward and keep it up all day, if
you want to be known as "a wide
awake". Make a note of the way
people carry their heads and see who
are alert, bright and awake and who
are the dutlards.
All readers of this publication are at
liberty to write for information on
any subject pertaining to health.
Address all such letters to Dr. David
H. Reeder, La Porte, Indiana, with at
least 6 cents in postage giving name
and address in full.
bout twenty-five years ago he was u
nited in marriage to Miss Mary Mar
tell, daughter'of Mrs. Mary Baasen
who with one daughter, Mrs. George L.
Petersen survive Mr. Arnold. The fun
eral was held Saturday afternoon, Rev.
Hohn of the Methodist church officia
ting.
MARGARET BAGEN.
Miss Margaret Bagen of St. Paul
and formerly a well known resident of
Springfield and also well known here
passed away in St. Joseph's hospital
in St. Paul, Wednesday, March 22.
About seven weeks ago she sprained
her leg severely when she had the
misfortune to take a fall and this
brought on her death.
CALCULATIONS of Relative Food Value
of the following articles were made by
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF BAKING,
Chicago, Illinois the Retail Prices used are
those quoted on February 6, 1922, by Mr.
Sol. Westerfeld, Grocer, Chicago. (Former
ly Secretary of Retail Grocers' Association):
Commodity Retail Price 10 Cents will purchase
Round Steak 25 Cents per Pound __356 Calories
Lamb Chops 35 cents per Pound 307 Calories
Premium Ham 45 Cents per Pound 363 Calories
Potatoes 4 Cents per Pound 738 Calories
Bread 9 Cents per Pound "1330" Calories
Milk 12 Cents per Quart 517 Calories
Eggs (Fresh) 43 Cents per Dozen 197 Calories
Eagle Roller Mill Coj
New Ulm, Minnesota.
Manufacturers of
DANIEL WEBSTER and GOLD COIN FLOUR
The deceased was born at Water-
j%sg
W
town, Wisconsin, in 1847 and came to
Springfield in 1862 where she estab
lished the first millinery store and
conducted it for nearly thirty years.
Miss Bagen was 75 years old when she
died. She is survived by two sisters
and two brothers. The remains were
brought to Springfield and the funeral
was held from St. Raphaels' Church a
week ago Friday morning. Rev.
Rant officiated and interment was
made in the Catholic cemetery.
JULIUS HONL.
Julius Honl, one of the early settlers
of Eden township, passed away at the
home of his daughter, Mrs. Isaac
Johnson of Sleepy Eye, a week ago
Saturday afternoon. Death was due
to old age and the usual attending com
plications. The deceased was born
in Austria-Hungary August 23, 1841,
and was consequently 81 years old
when he passed away. He came to
I America in 1864, first locating in Wis
consin and later coming to Elgin,
Minnesota. In the spring of 1871 he
was united in marriage to Hannah
Blaske. For their honeymoon trip
they struck out with an ox team and
covered wagon to look for land. They
spent six weeks in this part of the State
and finally settled in a homestead in
the Town of Eden which was to be
their home for about 35 years until
they moved to Morgan. After the
death of his wife in 1918 Mr. Honl
made his home with his children of
whom three are living, Ernst Honl and
Mrs. Isaac Johnson of Sleepy Eye and
Mrs. Carl Tretbar of Morgan. He is
also survived by one brother, Adolph
of Morgan. Mr. Honl always took a
keen interest in politics in the early
years and those who were running for
office or were otherwise connected
with politics frr the county will always
remember the Honl place as a place
where they were always welcome.
WILLIAM ROBERTS
William Roberts, a well-known resi
dent of Judson who made his home in
the neighborhood of Cambria for thirty
years or more, died at his home in
Judson Monday, March 27, following
an illnets of only five days from pneu
monia. Mr. .Roberts had every care
but it was impossible to stay the dis
ease and he passed away Monday and
was buried Wednesday.
The deceased was born in Cambria,
Wisconsin, sixty-five years ago last
August. When a small boy he came
with his parents to Minnesota and grew
to manhood here. He was iramed
about thirty years ago to Ruth Lewis,
who with two sons, survives him. All
of the immediate ielatives live in the
immediate neighborhhood, one son be
ing still at home and the other mar
ried- and living on a farm nearby.
There are two sisters, Mrs. Jas. D.
Price, and Mrs. D. C. Price, both of
Cambria, and one brother, Enoch
Roberts, living near Cambria. The
deceased had lived for nearly fifteen
years at Judson and before that always
in the vicinity.
Mr. Roberts was a most highly es
teemed character, of a quiet, retiring
disposition, a good husband and father.
His loss will be greatly felt by his
family and friends.
The funeral services were held at
Jerusalem Presbyterian church with
Rev. H. C. Griffiths of Lake Crystal,
Rev. John D. Jones of Ottawa and Rev.
E. W. Griffiths of Cambria officiat
ing. Interment was made in the Jeru
salem cemetery.
MRS. ELIZABETH REIN.
Mrs. Elizabeth Rein, mother of
Mrs. O. C. Wichtel, died at 11 o'clock
Monday evening following a heart
stroke which resulted in almost imme
diate death. Mrs. Rein had been here
with her daughter only three days after
having been away for three months
taking care of her brother's familv who
had been ill in Wisconsin.
Mrs. Rein was born November 18
1870 at Grafton, Wisconsin. Her mai
den name was Brodda. She was mar
ried in 1893 to Frank Rein at Burling
ton, Wisconsin. Mrs. O. C. Wichtel
is the only child of this marriage: Mr.
Rein died 22 years ago. Mrs. Rein
was matron at the Union hospital for
about five years. Her health had been
of the best and her demise came as a
terrible shock.
The deceased is survived by three
brothers, Paul, William and Robert
Brodda of Burlington, Wisconsin, and
three sisters, Mrs. Minnie Jensen of
Milwaukee, Mrs. Herman Warnke and
Mrs. Henry Storey of Burlington,
Wisconsin.
Funeral services will be Conducted
Wednesday by Rev. C. J. Albrecht at
noon and the remains will be shipped
to Burlington for burial which\ will
take place Friday* Mrs. Rein was a
a member of the local Lutheran church
and was an active worker ia that
association.
A. A. Alwin and son, Ora, and Mike
Merkle are working near Nicollet this
week where they are busy plastering
the lute Henry Netzke heme in Gran
by township which was wrecked iome
time ago by an explosion. Mr* and
Mrs. Otto Bode are making their home
on the »Netzke farm. Mrs. Bode was
formerly Miss Luella Netzke.
We do white washing and disinfect
barns, dairy barns, cellars, and, base
ments.- If you care to have us do it,
call 316L. Petersen and Arionus.
Our price is 90 cents and up.
Adv. 14-15p
New Ulrn Review, New TJlm, Minn., Wednesday, April 5, 1922.
A
CAMBRIA NEWS.
Emrys Lloyd sold a team of horses
to a dealer at Lake Crystal Monday
for which he received $300.00.
The Saffert Construction Co. have
the contract for the construction cf the
new creamery which will be made of
cement blocks. Contractor Gronau of
New Ulm began work yesterday on
the building which is to £ost $3900.00.
A little daughter came to gladden
the home of Mr. and Mrs. Morgan
Evans Saturday April 1. This is the
first girl in the family, the two older
children being boys.
Mrs. Nathaniel Edwards of Capa,
S. D. is visiting at the home of her
brother-in-law, Hugh Edwards.
Miss Wendla Niska, a nurse from
the Immanuel Hospital of Mankato,
visited with Mrs. D. W. Harris last
week.
Roy Davis is getting busy at his
trade of painting and paper hanging.
Spring is here.
Mrs. Wm. F. Evans is very ill and
her mother, Mis. Lewis, of Lake Crys
tal is taking care of herx Mrs. Ed.
Nichols of New Ulm, a sister is also
helping in the care of the invalid.
D. C. Price has added a line of
Millinery to his general store stock.
Griffin Jones has been very ill with
pneumonia. A nurse and two doctors
are in attendance and Mr. Jones is
now on the mend.
Mr. and Mrs. Ellis L. Jones of But
ternut Valley were recent guests of
Mr. and Mrs. James Lloyd.
Mrs. John T. Evans who has been
ill at the Union Hospital in New Ulm
has returned home. She is still some
what weak but is getting along as
well as can be expected.
There is a great deal of pneumonia
in this vicinity. Shell Reed is
another-examined,
victim of this dread affliction.
Dan Williams has rented his farm tc
George Frahm and his two sons from
Dennison, Iowa. The new people have
already arrived and unloaded their
household goods this week.
Order for Hearing Guardians Ac
count.
State of Minnesota,
County of Brown, ss.
In Probate Court k*#
In the Matter of the Guardianship
of Conrad Groebner, Minor.
On reading and filing the Petition of
Chas. H. Stuebe, Guardian of Conrad
Groebner, the above named Minor.
It is Ordered, pursuant to1 the prayer
of said Petitioner, that a time be fixed
for examining and allowingThis account,
that said account be examined and
Petition heard by the Judge of this
Court on the 2nd day of May 1922, at
10 o'clock in the forenoon of that day,
at the Probate Office in said County.
And it is Further Ordered, that
public notice be given to all persons
interested of the time and place of
examining said account, by publishing
a copy of this order in the New Ulm
Review, a weekly newspaper, printed
and* published at New Ulm in said
County, at least once in each week for
3 successive weeks prior to said day of
such hearing.
Dated at New Ulm, the 3rd day of
April A. D. 1922.
(Court Seal) WM. B. MATHER,
14-16 Judge of Probate.
ORDER TO EXAMINE ACCOUNTS
STATE OF MINNESOTA
County of Brown ss.
In Probate Court
Special Term, April 3rd, 1922.
In the matter of the estate of Con
rad Groebner, Deceased.
On reading and filing the petition
of Herbert GroebneT, Administrator of
the estate of Conrad Groebner, de
ceased, representing among other
things, that he has fully administered
said estate, and praying that a time
and place be fixed for examining and
allowing the final account of his ad
ministration and for the assignment of
the residue of said estate to the parties
entitled thereto by law:
It is ordered, that said account'be
examined, and petition and application
for the allowance of said elaims and
debts so paid by him and not yet al
lowed according to laV be heard by this
Court, on Tuesday the 2nd day of
May A. D. 1922 at 10 o'clock A. M.,
at the Probate Office, in the City of
New Ulm in said County.
And it is further ordered, that' notice
thereof be given to all persons in
terested by publishing this order once
in each week for three successive weeks
prior to said day of hearing in the
New Ulm Review, a weekly newspaper,
printed and published at New Ulm in
WM. B. MATHER,
*4jfeS judge of Probate, fc*
(Court seal) Adv 14-16.
ORDER TO EXAMINE ACCOUNTS
STATE OF MINNESOTA,
County of Brown, ss.
In Probate Court,
*x Special Term, April 3rd, 1922.
In the matter of the estate of Louise
Toberer Deceased^
On reading and filing the petition
of Anna Toberer and EKrieda Toberer,
Executors of the estate of Louise To
berer deceased, representing among
other thing?, that they hawtfully ad
ministered said estate, and- prayjtg
that a time and place be fixed fcr
examining and allowing the final ac
count of their administration and for
the assignment of the residue of said
estate to the parties entitled thereto
by law:
It is ordered, that said account be
examined, and petition and application
for the allowance of said claims and
debts so paid by him and not yet al
lowed according to law be heard by
this Court, on Tuesday the 2nd day of
May A. D. 1922 at 10 c'clock A. M.,
at the Probate office, in theCityofNew
Ulm in said county.
And it is further ordered, that notice
thereof be given to all persons interested
by publishing this order once in each
week for three successive weeks prior
to said day of hearing in the New Ulm
Review, a weekly newspaper, printed
and published at New Ulm in said
County.
Dated at New Ulm, the 3rd day of
April A. D. 1922.
By the Court,
WM. B. MATHER,
Judge of Probate.
(Court Seal) Adv. 14-16
ORDER TO EXAMINE ACCOUNTS.
STATE OF MINNESOTA,
County of Brown, ss.
In Probate Court,
Special Term, March 27th,1922
In the matter of the estate of An
dreas Dauer, Deceased.
On reading and filing the petition
of Victor A. Dauer, Executor of the
estate of Andreas Dauer deceased,
representing among other things, that
he has fully administered said estate,
and praying that a time and place be
fixed for examining and allowing the
final account of his administration and
for the assignment of the residue of
said estate to the parties entitled there
to by law:
It is Ordered, that said account be
and petition and applica
tion for the allowance of said claims
and debts so paid by him and not yet
allowed according to law be heard
by this Court, on Tuesday the 25th
day of April A. D. 1922 at 10 o'clock
A. M., at the Probate Office, in the
City of New Ulm in said County.A
And it is Further Ordered, that no
tice thereof be given to all persons
interested by publishing this order
once in each week for three successive
weeks prior to said day of hearing
in the New Ulm Review, a weekly
newspaper, printed and published at
New Ulm in said County.
Dated at New Ulm, the 27th day
of March A. D. 1922.
By the Court,
(Court Seal)
WM. B. MATHER
13-15. Judge of Probate.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Road Dragging, Town of Cotton
wood.
On Monday, April 10th, at the hour
of 8 o'clock P. M., the Town Board of
Cottonwood will meet at the Town
Clerk's Office for the purpose of re
ceiving bids and letting the contract
for Road dragging on roads numbered
1,2, 3,4 and 5. Plans and specifications
are on file at the office of the Town
Clerk. The Board reserves the right
to reject any or all bids.
A. F. Haas, Town Clerk.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Road Dragging, Town of Sigel.
Sealed bids will be received by the
town Clerk of the Town of Sigel,
Brown Co., Minn., up to 1 o'clock p.
m.. April 15, 1922. At said time bids
will be opened at his office in said
Town. The town board outlines two
routes to two successful bidders in each
road district. The Board reserves the
right to reject any or all bids.
Jos. G. Tauer, Town Clerk.
A'dv. 13-15c
MARKET REPORT.
(Corrected March 28 1922.)
WHEAT—
No. 1
No. 2
No 3
Rye, per bushel
?%&£&
said County.
Dated at New Ulm, the 3rd day of
April A. D. 1922. 1 3 S & I
t,'*& By the Court,
S1.43
1.38
1.30
No. 2 .86
Barley .45
Oats .25
Corn .41
FLOUR—
Rye Flour, 100 lbs. "11 6.50 7.0Q
Compass 4.60 4 90
Angelina 4.40 4.70
Shorts, per 100 lbs 1.35 1.45
Bran, per 100 lbs Z- 1.25 1.35
Screenings, per sack 1.00 1.15
Creamery Butter, per lb.,—?!7M
Order to Examine Accounts.
State of Minnesota,
County of Brown, ss."
%(ln Probate Court .H Ji'
4 5
.37
Dairy Butter, per lb.
Potatoes, per bu.
Eggs, per dozen __«lf_ i?
Hogs, per 100 lbs.
Veal Calves, live, per 100 lbs.^L_
Cows, live, per cwt. 3.00
Sheep, live, per cwt 4.00—5.00
Spring Chickens J.9
Old Roosters 20
Ducks .16
Geese .15
Turkey .25
Hay, per ton .08 .05
Soft Coal, per ton 10.00—15.00
Hard Coal per ton 18.00—19.00
1.50-
.20
9.35
6 25
4.00
I E S &
Beef Hides, 45 lbs. and up .05
J©eef Hides, 25-45 lbs .05
N 1 Kip, 15-25 lbs. ,#06
N 1 Call Skins, 8-15 lbs, must,
be strictly short-haired 1.07
I Special Term, March 20th, 1922.
In the Matter of the Estate of Emilie
^Schneider, deceased.
On reading and filing theietition
of August Sehneider, Administrator of
the estate of Emilie Schneider, de
ceased, representing among other
things, that he has fully administered
said estate, and praying that a time
and place be fixed for examining and
allowing the final account of his ad
ministration and for the assignment
of the residue of said estate to the
parties entitled thereto by law:
It is Ordered, that said account be
examined, and petition and applica
tion for the allowance of said claims
and debts so paid by him and not jet
allowed according to law be heard by
this Court, on Monday the 17th day of
April A. D. 1922, at 10 o'clock A. M.,
at the Probate Office, in the City of
New Ulm in said County.
And it is Further Ordered, that
notice thereof be given to all persons
interested by publishing this order
once in each week for three successive
weeks prior to said day of hearing in the
New Ulm Review, a weekly newspaper,
printed and published at New Ulm in
said County.
Dated at New Ulm, the 20th day of
March A. D. 1922.
By the Court,
(Court Seal) WM. B. MATHER,
12-14 Judge of Probate.
Order for Hearing Proofs of Will.
State of Minnesota,
County of Brown, ss.
In Probate Court
Special Term, March 17th, 1922.
In the Matter of the Estate of Emilie
Zellmer, deceased.
Whereas, an instrument in writing,
purporting to be the last will and
testament and Codicil of Emilie
Zellmer, late of said county, has been
delivered to this Court.
And Whereas, Annie Pfeiffer, who
is named as executrix has filed there
with her petition, representing among
other things that said Emilie Zellmer
died in said county on the 12th day of
March A. D. 1922, testate and that
said petitioner is the executrix named
in said last will and testament, and
praying that said instrument may be
admitted to probate, and that letters
testamentary be to her issued thereon.
It is Ordered, that the proofs of said
instrument and the said petition, be
heard before this Court, at the Probate
office, in the Court House, in the City
of New Ulm, in said County, on the
17th day of April A. D. 1922, at 10
o'clock in the forenoon, when all con
cerned may appear and contest the
probate of said instrument.
And it is Further Ordered, that
public notice of the time and place of
said hearing be given to all persons
interested, by publication of a copy of
this order for three successive weeks
previous to said day of hearing in the
New Ulm Review, a weekly news
paper, printed and published at the
City of New Ulm, in said county.
Dated at New Ulm, Minn., March
17th, A. D. 1922.
By the Court,
CCourt Seal) WM. B. MATHER,
12-14
Judge of Probate.
GARDEN SEEDS
Our seeds are all tested for
geimination and are of the
HIGHEST KNOWN QUALTY
By Planting seeds of this class you
are assured of success, providing
sofl and weather conditions are
favorable.
Try our New DeLue's Golden
Giant Sweet Corn, Sudan Grass and
Hubam Annual White Sweet Clover
MINNESOTA SEED GO.PROGRAM
NEW ULM, MINN.
Bingham Bros.
& Gram
VEWULM MINN.
'That you may know more
of Osteopathy" Consult
DR. H. C. EDMISTON
OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN
New Weber Block
Phone Office 123 House I23L
Call*Made Day and Night
MJSNEW ULM. MINN.
Osteopaths are the original
"Spine Adjusters"
$?CT
N a s«s
PAGE SEVEN.
WM. J. VON BANK D. D. S.
j.
r?
& DENTIST
Office in Ottomeyer Bldg.
Tel. Residence, 150 Office 237.
NEW ULM, MINN.
CHAS. EMMERICH
PLUMBER
Steam and Hot Water Heating
Gas Fitting.
We are prepared to do ail kinds
plumbing In a fir^t-class manner. Do
not fall to call upon us when plumbers*
tarrleas are required.
Minn, and Center Sts.
Phone 281 New Ulm
T. F. Hammermeister
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
Office over Arbes Bros/ new Drug Store
Phenec
I
IN. W. 85 1 N.W. 50
JOHN HENLE
Fire Accident]
a do Health
Hai Liability
A to in
Insurance
Office: Ottomeyer Block.
WHY NOT BOOST
HOME PRODUCTS
and Build With
NEW ULM BRICK
BRICK
TILE
BLOCKS
HEATING
Estimates Cheerfully Furnished.
Corner Minn, and 3rd North St.
DR. A. V. SEIFBRT
DENTIST
OFFICE OVER ARBES BROS..
DRUGSTORE.
Phone 11-L. New Ulm, Minn*
ALBERT STELNHAUSER
ATTORNEY AT LAW
1
Office over Review
Spsdal attention given to probating
Estates. Practice In all Courts
ol the State and U. S. Courts.
Nav Ulm. Minn.
Dr. J. H. Vogel Dr. O. Seifert/
Drs. Vogel & Seifert
Vogel Block
126 1-2 N. Minnesota St
NEW ULM, MINN.
TURNER HALL
OF CLASSES IN GYM
N A S I S
1st Boys' Class—6—10 yearsj
Wednesday, 4—5 p. m. ^&'*
Saturday, 9—10 a. m.
2nd Boys' Class—10—14 a & $
Monday,4:30—5:30p.m. *,
Thursday, 4:80—5:30 p.
Juniors' Class—14—18 years. SP
Monday, 7:30—8:30 p.
Friday, 7:30—8:30 p. m.
Mens' Class—18 years and oyi
Tuesday, 8:15—10 p. m.
Friday, 8:30—10 p. m. M8F%80%
Seniors' Class. §y|
Wednesday, 8:30—9:30 p. m. ,fm
1st Girls' Class—6—11 years,
Tuesday, 4:30—5:30 p. m.
Saturday, 10—11 a. m.
2nd Girls' Class—11—15 years.
Tuesday, 5—6 p. m.
Friday, 4—5 p. m.
3rd Girls' Class—15—18 years.
Wednesday, 7:30—8:30 p. m.
Saturday, 7:30—8:30 p. m.
1st Ladies' Class—Beginners.
Thursday, 7:30—8 p. m.
2nd Ladies' Class—Advanced.
Thursday, 8—9 p. jn.
Anton Leibold,
Instructor,
-a
GRAVEL
Let us quote you prices
NewDlmBrick&TileYds.
DR. F. J. PELANT
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
Office Over Arbes Bros. Drug
Store
PHONE: Office, 360
PHONE Residence. 197 NEW CJLM, MINN.
Dr. O. C. Strickler Dr. F. H. Dubbe
DRS. STRICKLER & DUBBE
PHYSICIANS and SURGEONS
Office Over State Bank of New Ulm
Office houra: 10 to 12 a. 1 to 4 p.
Phones—Office, 60 Dr. Strickler res,. 109
Dr. Dubbe res.150.
NEW ULM, MINNESOTA
P. W. SOUKUP
PLUMBING
AND
*S*S
1

xml | txt