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Arkansas ladies' journal. (Little Rock, Ark.) 1884-1886, October 11, 1884, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90050096/1884-10-11/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOL. 1. NO. 15.
THE
ARKANSAS LADIES’ JOURNAL.
W. LOUGHBOROUGH,
editress.
MRS GILBERT KNAPP,
MRS W a AnTRELL,
| A w GIBB* I Associate Writers.
WOODRUFF.
MRS J L. PALMER,
. MISS BESSIE CANTRELL,
Liiies in business enterprises, can find with this journal
arrciAi. rates of advertising.
Advertisements or subscriptions, and matter intended for the
columns of our paper, we desire addressed
•‘ARKANSAS LADIES' JOURNAL."
In our last issue, by a printer’s inaccu
racy we were made to allude to Miss
Woodruff’s article as containing “long
words.” We wrote “lovely words” and
reassert that they are “lovely words” and
desire to correct the printed error of last
week.
We publish today a poem from the pen
of a lady who in her pleasant home in our
city and along her garden walks, cultivates
the choicest shrubs and rarest flowers.
While also in her home and through her
quiet skillful hand radiates kindly deeds
and gentle charities to friend, neighbor
end strangers and all indeed within her
influence.
The editress wishes to thank her young
bond, Mr. Presley Crawford, of Fayette
, for the gift by express, and pleasant
surprise, of a barrel of splendid apples.
® ave heard of the large growth and
beauty of the Washington county fruit, the
an some specimens before us well main
n t e reputation that the orchards of
ash >ngton county have established.
o haVe een some Ganges at the
Wo d ? teS ArSenaL Lieufc * C - <*•
Iv m ’ W h° COUr f eous an d gentleman
ferrpA? en(^B here, has been trans-
Florid? T Atlanta ‘ From St * Augustine,
drived’ i leUt ‘ ’ Davis and fanii, y have
Mie» i* are ' )e ’ ng ca^ed u P on hy the
Who has k OUnB Pe ° ple * Lieut Os g° od ,
leaves wUIT Btationed at the Arsenal,
where d i i' S for Fortress Monroe,
salt air oTti T will en J°y tl)e soft
Ratlin h a station. Lieut,
U T Ue a^Bo and he super*
7 Wet. John Grtobeh
LITTLE ROCK, ARK., OCTOBER 11, 1884.
Prof. Monnier’s studio is becoming a cen
ter of interest to our ladies. To paint, to
grow beneath one’s touch the lovely blos
soms of the passing summer, to adorn ones
home, to fit some pretty window place
with tiles and bits of china, upon which one
may paint softly shaded landscapes, or deli
cately tinted floral sprays. Can not our lad
ies pass many pleasant moments in this way?
And is not painting a charming elegance
of life?
The telegram brings us the news of a
sad disaster at Marquett. A number of
men were in the Hecla branch of the
Calumet and Hecla mine. When a fire
broke out among the timbers one thousand
one hundred feet under ground. Two
men were sent down to start the pumps,
both were suffocated and their bodies could
not be reached. There are still a number
of miners in the lower level of the mine,
but fresh air cau be pumped to them and
it is believed they will escape. What a
fate! To be more than a thousand feet
under the ground, and between the lives,
so far beneath, and the rescuing party
above to have the roaring consuming
flames intervene.
The will of Mrs. Augusta M. Hunting
ton was probated at Cincinnati October 8.
This lady gave to Bishop Whipple of
Minnesota, three hundred thousand dollars
for educational purposes. Eighty thous
and of which was to be expended for the
education of boys. A gift so wise, will
confer, if well administered, untold benefit
upon the human race. Thus the devising
of a thoughtful magnanimous mind, is one
of heaven’s blessing to a community.
And so we trust that here at home the
thoughtful gentlemen of our city will urge
the proposition which has been made
looking to a night school for our young
and future citizens. There are many who
unfortunately are compelled to bear the
daily burden of a busy laborious life. Let
us help them, that they may looking up
ward, by education, help themselves.
To an appreciate person the accomplish
ments of life are a source of infinite satis
faction. The practical part of existence
will assert itself but painting, music or
study in the abstract, must be encouraged
by some answering chord of the mind, to
be accomplished is to possess some anti
dote to the petty tittle-tattle or gossip of
Subset ‘ itiou, 5‘2.00 a Tear.
other’s concern, which so often engrosses
the unoccupied mind. A very graceful as
well as useful accomplishment is the study
of a foriegn language and French, which is
the most elegant language of refined life,
is now, through the presence of a native
teacher, within the reach of our ladies and
young people. Madame Monfoit, for
merly a teacher in Baltimore, but born a
Parisian, will at a moderate price give
lessons in French. Through her then, the
students of the language can acquire the
smooth Parisian accent, without which the
language loses much of its charm.
The fatal accident along the shore of
Lake Michigan, by which a contractor and
eight men were drowned while engaged in
the Chicago tunnel construction, reads
from a late telegram like a horrible night
mare. That while the storm was at its
height the waves should have carried their
house into the boiling lake. That men
clinging to timbers should have been torn
by the waves with such terrible force from
any anchorage they may have chosen.
That wind and water alike should combine
to wrench them from their hold and takes
them from any refuge near, seems painfully
unreal. Yet in fact it was a frightful and
real emergency happening last Wednesday,
but reading like a sea story that Russell
might have depicted in the fearful cruise
of his “Lady Maude.”
The disastrous result of Col. Stewart’s
progress toward Dongola in the Egyptian
campaign will now convince the public
that Sir Garnet Wolsley was wise in se
curing the services of Canadian boatmen,
who being accustomed to the rapids and
boulders of their own swift flowing rivers,
might be found futile in expedients when
boating along the inland streams of Egypt
and Africa. When Col. Stewart’s party
stranded upon the rocks of the cataract at
Woody Sarne and were massacreed by the
treacherous Arabs, the key note was
sounded for the wandering tribes extinc
tion. The war carried now to the interior
for the rescue of Geu. Gordon will grow
more and more relentless as the Arabs
various of cruelty retard the progress of
regiments and troops, marching to the
different points from whence the English
army will penetrate the country mass and
establish subsistence quarters, whether the
hostile tribe" concur or no.

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