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Arkansas ladies' journal. (Little Rock, Ark.) 1884-1886, October 25, 1884, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90050096/1884-10-25/ed-1/seq-3/

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10. gl f|| 111
VOL. 1. NO. 17.
THE
ARKANSAS LADIES’ JOURNAL.
W. LOUGHBOROUGH,
editress.
MRS. GILBERT KNAPP, 1
MRS. W. A. CANTRELL,
MBS SAM. TATE,
MRS E.W. GIBB, )■ Associate Writers.
MISS GEORGINE WOODRUFF, I
MRS. J. L. PALMER,
MISS BESSIE CANTRELL, J
Ladies in business enterprises, can find with this journal
snciAL rates of advertising.
Advertisements or subscriptions, and matter intended for the
columns of our paper, we desire addressed
“ARKANSAS LADIES’ JOURNAL.’’
The most interesting part of our signa]
service now, is the systematized transmit
ting of reports and predictions of the
weather. The cold wave is a royal trav
eler, whose appearance is heralded, and
whose speed in approaching is far in ad
vance of a royal private car.
The convention for the nomination of
chief justice is now, at the time of going
to press, holding its sittings. It is to be
hoped that the choice of the convention
will be a wise one. Where great interests
are concerned, the deliberations of a body
representing the people, and instructed
by them, should be far sighted and judi
cious.
The indomitable Bennett and his con
feres are still working upon the broken
cable. The steamer Fariday is anchored
°fi the Coney Island life saving station,
and the cable is coiled upon rafts. The
Ing boat Stranahan is assisting the Fari
day, upon which are stationed several
prominent electricians, with instruments
°r the purpose 'of testing the cable, as it
played out. The American end of the
nable being safely landed, tests are still to
e made of its acurate position and work
ng quality. This great monopoly, the
®®ble of Bennett and Makay will still re
ln a large commercial advatage to
me rchants in this country and abroad, as
n arges will become less, from the emula-.
On reßU lting from two great sub-marine
a«wi lineg,
LITTLE ROCK, ARK., OCTOBER 25, 1884.
He and She.
RY EDWIN ARNOLD.
“ She is dead!” they said to him, “come
away.”
Kiss her and leave her—thy love is clay.
Over her eyes that gazed too much,
They drew the lids with a gentle touch ;
With a tender touch they closed up well
The sweet thin lips that had secrets to tell.
About her brows and beautiful face,
They tied her veil and.her marriage lace ;
And over her bosom they crossed her
hands;
“ Come away! ” they said : “God under
stands.”
And there was silence, and nothing there
But silence and scents of equiantere,
And jasamine and roses, and rosemary;
And they said, “as a lady should lie, lies
she.”
But he who loved her too well to dread
The sweet, the stately, the beautiful dead,
He lit his lamp and took the key
And turned it—alone again—he and she.
He and she; yet she would not smile
Though he called her the name she loved
ere while.
Then he said : “ Cold lips and breast with
out breath,
Is there no voice, no language of death.”
“ Did life roll back its records dear,
And show, as they say it does, past things
dear?
“ And was it the innermost heart of the
bliss,
To find out so, what a wisdom love is ?
“ 0 perfect dead! 0, dead most dear,
I hold the breath of my soul to hear.
“ I would tell you, darling, if I were dead,
And t’were your hot tears on my brow shed.
“You would not ask vainly, with stream
ing eyes,
Which of all death was the chiefest sur
prise.”
Who will believe that he heard her say,
With the sweet soft voice, in the dear old
way:
“ The utmost wonder is this: I hear
And see you, and love you, and kiss you,
dear ;
And am your angel, who was your bride,
And know that, though dead, I have never
died.”
Subscription, $2.00 a Year.
There are some jests, mads by the news
paper fraternity, concerning the camels
that are to be used by the English troops
in Egypt. It appears that an order has
been issued by English generals, instruct
ing the soldiers to treat the camels with
kindness, and forbiding “ foul language”
used in the hearing of these “ships of the
desert.” It is said that the camel is a
conceited misanthrope, who possesses a
dozen stomaches, to say nothing of kegs of
water, and who in the desert has such a de
cided advantage of his companions 'on the
trip, that his opinion of himself is quite ele
vated, therefore an order protecting him
from thejusual methods of punishment, gives
his bruteship a decided advantage in the
march.
The Deaconess Institute,
Among the semi-centennials recently
celebrated in Germany is the famous
Deaconess Institute, in Kaiserwertb,
founded in 1833, by Rev. F. Fliedner, the
father of the well-known Protestant mis
sionary Fliedner in Spain. The begin
nings of this institution were quite hum
ble, “the first and only building being a
mere shanty.” Now there are nine large
buildings at Kaiserwerth, and eleven asso
ciation branch houses in Germany and
in other countries. Altogether there are,
at present, 575 deaconesses employed by
these houses in various works of
charity and Christian love. The last
annual report showed an expenditure of
321,164 marks by this institution, which
is the income from voluntary contributions.
The centenary of Sir Moses Montefiore
will be celebrated by the Fnited Hebrew
congregation and other societies by a re
ligious service, to be held at the Broad
Street Synagogue, Philadelphia, on Sun- I
day, October 26. A tablet, with a suita- I
ble inscription, to commemorate the event, I
is to be placed in one of the public institu- |
tions.
F. Marion Crawford, the author of “Mr.
Isaacs,” “ The Roman Singer,” and other g
recent novels, was married in Constantino-..
pie, Saturday last, to Miss Berdan, daugh
ter of Gen. Berdan, formerly of Troy, N.||
Y., and the inventor of a well-known rifle I 1
gun. The whole of the diplomatic body
and the elite of society were present at the
wedding.

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