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Arkansas ladies' journal. (Little Rock, Ark.) 1884-1886, February 28, 1885, Image 2

Image and text provided by Arkansas State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90050096/1885-02-28/ed-1/seq-2/

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terrible sweep of destruction, to be rescued
from forgetfulness.’’ She filled the hands
of her visitors with flowers and their
hearts with love. She is a model Southern
housekeeper, takes entire charge of her
plants and grounds and Jersey cows and
horses, besides finding leisure to make
rapid progress in her new book. “Idoit by
having system ” was her answer, when asked
how she managed to do so much. It was
a pleasant hour, and it added another to
the many special memorable incidents of
the journey in the South.”
DOUX SOUVENIR.
{Concluded.)
Days passed. Philip did not appear.
Then one day a package came for Nora,
containing a very small copy of “ Doux
Souvenir,” exquisitely bound in violet.
From the pages dropped a note:
“ Nora, — I have seen your father, who
tells me that you know all; this has
brought me to a sense of my own peril, and
I feel I dare not meet you again.
Philip.”
Nora told herself she should not, would
not care, and she forced herself to be brave;
but she did care for all that, and she laid
away “Doux Souvenirah ! “Triste
Souvenir,” and never played it now.
Still her life went on the same; and one
evening she found herself in the artist’s
reception in company with some friends.
Exquisitely-dressed groups passed up and
down before the beautiful pictures, the air
was filled with sweet sounds and the scent
of rare flowers, and Nora was almost for
getting to feel sad. There was a pause in
the music, and her friends were chattering
gayly around her, when softly, sweetly
from an adjoining room came the sounds
of “Doux Souvenir.” Turning quickly,
Nora met Philip’s eyes.
He stepped' forward. “ 1 must speak to
you this once,” he said.
With a word of excuse to her friends she
took his offered arm and walked with him
up and down, always within sound of the
song.
“ Nora,” he whispered, passionately, “I
cannot keep away from you —T cannot
live without you. Speak one word to
strengthen me, to comfort me.”
But the same set look was on her face,
and she stopped suddenly. Her eyes
were fastened on a picture hanging near.
Two shadowy forms driven by a terrible,
cruel wind, and the low, sad moaning of
the song might have been the sound of its
passing.
His sad eyes followed hers, his face too
grew deathly white.
“1 accept the poitent,” he sighed; “I
take the warning. Come away, Nora,
come away. Oh, come! ”
“ No,” she answered, dreamily, “ I
would rather stay.”
“ Nora,” he pleaded, “won’t you listen to
me? I implore you, for my sake, if you
will not for your own.”
“I cannot move,” she whispered; “some
thing holds me to the spot.”
A look of torture passed over his face
followed by one of sudden relief, as a
young artist passed close to him.
“Ernest!” he said, addressing him,
“ quick! stop that music. I will ex
plain later—only be quick ! ”
An exclamation of surprise and pain
escaped the artist’s lips; but the next
moment he dashed forward, saying, “ The
lady has fainted ! Here, this way, I will
show you.” He threw wide a small door
beside them, which had been concealed by
a heavy curtain, and opened into a quiet
room.
Philip carried in Nora and laid her on
a lounge, while the other hastened to ad
mit the air. Then while she lay restored,
but white and still, too weak to open her
eyes, she heard the stranger say, “Philip,
old friend, forgive me if you can. 1 loved
her, you did not.”
Philip only answered, quietly, “ Where
is she now ? ”
“ Dead,” groaned the artist; “ dead two
months since. You never cared for her,
and I would have given my life to save
her. Do not excuse my sin. I only ask
your pardon.”
Nora opened her eyes to see Philip lay
his hand in that of the man who had so
heartlessly betrayed him.
“ I forgive you now,” she heard him
say. “ I once thought I never should.
You painted the Francesca da Rimini?
“Yes. You noticed the likeness?
And did you read the repentance and
misery that could only paint such anguish?”
“ I think I did,” he answered.
Nora rose. “Did you paint that
lovely, beautiful picture?” she asked,
turning to the artist.
He bowed.
I cannot think, ’ she sighed, passing
her hand over her brow, “ how is it pos
sible ; but that is what has haunted me for
years when I played ‘Doux Souvenir,’
until the notes have come to sound like
storm-winds and I could see plainly those
weary forms drifting hither and thither—
one, ah ! one was like you, only a shadow,
and the other—”
“ She is dead now,” he said, hoarsely ;
“ let her rest.”
Nora turned gently and gave him her
hand. “I am sorry for you,” she said.
1 hen Philip drew her away. Without
a word he took her back to her friends,
made his adieux and left. She did not see
him again for months.
when she was in her violet,
“I want to try an CJ
said, after greeting her. “Hsu I
played-Doux Souvenir.’
“ Never,” she replied. I
“ Do so now,” I
Nora shrank and shivered. |
Mam certain the spell i 8 g J
said. “You have seen the pi c J
reality. You will not fear it now ” 1
Then she obeyed. Fi rst w ■
hushed prelude, next the sighing
song, then the wailing sadness ofthß
ing phrase ; but her face no longer O'
a bright flush covered her che?« (
haps because Philip’s arm was belli Jb
her, while her happy head leaned®
breast. I
B 1
and dcitm. ft
Harper Remington, the AnieraK a(
in London, is painting portraitso^ft IH
Cornwallis West and the M«B rs
Clarke and Nelly Farren Calhoun. K-i,
B
Princess Louise’s
sketches of Canadian life ami see«®iih
used exclusively in illustrating
guide-book to Canada, compiled aB
issued by the Dominion Governmaß
Mr. John Bigelow has edited,
per & Brothers are soon to
Writings and Speeches of
den.” Mr. Bigelow is
writing a memoir of Mr. Tilden. Mp'd’i
■fork
At a recent sale in M
studio properties of the lu
Mills, a bell made of the
bronze guns captured at New e
Jackson, was sold for a small Bf
Jackson statute by Mills was
same. Plaster casts of Li« ( ’ l " 1 r >
and other statesmen were sold Wo
time.
A celebrated professor
there were three things DfC \^B ( .
prima donna to do—eat, si". BE .
Indigestion affects the thro
a cold, and during an opera
drink water, which ins an ,
voice. She must sleep a B|
in the twenty-four, am P
“ When she fails to prad 1
observes it
her friends observe i > .
for three days the }
Altogether the hfej®
many respects a
Kellogg thinks only
divine melodies conap 6 B

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