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Batesville daily guard. (Batesville, Ark.) 1912-1924, October 08, 1912, Image 1

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BATESVILLE DAILY GUARD.
VOLUME VI.
BIG RECEPTION
IS PLANNED
FOR WILSON
People of St. Louis and Surrounding
Sections to Hear Next President
Speak Tomorrow.
St. Louis, Oct. B.—More than 15,-
000 persons will hear Gov. Woodrow
Wilson’s speech in the Coliseum here
Wednesday night, according to fore
casts issued by the democratic organ
izations in charge of arrangements
Monday. Hundreds of visitors from
every county in eastern half of the
state are expected, while the demo
cratic ward committeemen said a
great majority of the democratic vot
ers of their wards were eager to get
to the Coliseum in time to hear the
speech.
The problem of handling the crowd
is worrying the arrangements com
mittee. Secretary O'Donnell of the
democratic city committee said that
‘fully 20,000 men who march in the
p.'rchlight parade will not get to the
I sliseum in time to get seats in the
3 All. The marchers will pass into
She Coliseum and then march out
Bgain. The overflow meetings will be
addressed by democratic state candi
■ates, and by Speaker Champ Clark,
yhile Gov. Wilson is delivering his
jpeech inside.
I The marching clubs will form on
Twelfth street, and on Jefferson av
■rue north and south of the Coliseum
fig delegations of marchers from St.
fouis county and East St. Louis will
feme in on horseback, all carrying
b.chlights.
National Committeeman Goltra
ilaced orders with every torchlight
actory in the country to get an ade
quate supply. He ordered 16,000
orches. but the demand for them has
ecn so great he cut down the city
ommittee’s allotment from 15,000 to
0,000.
Every train coming to St. Louis to
iay brings crowds of people from
\rkar.sas and other adjoining states,
tho are eager to see the next presi
/■"t and hear him speak.
Ilans for church accepted
ißids Will Be Received By the Build-
I ing Board and Work Will
v Soon Begin.
f Talking to a Guard man this morn-
Rev. T. Y. Ramsey, pastor of the
■ethodist church, says that the plans
■or the new church have been accept
and will now be placed in the
Bands of contractors for bids on the
I CONSERVATIVE BANKING
V The United States control and su-
ft pervision of National Banks stand for
ft Conservatism.
ft Loans on real estate are prohibited.
K Loans on the bank's own stock are
■ prohibited.
ft Large loans [in excess of 10 per
ft cent of capital and surplus] are pro-
K hibited.
B Tying the bank's money up in stocks,
Hk bonds [except U. S. bonds] or real es-
tate [except its own building] is pro
hibited.
A National Bank is compelled by
HK law to keep on hands at all times at
HI 1 jast 15 per cent of its deposits, in cash.
Part of this may be kept in other Nat
y ional Banks which have been approved
E as “Reserve Agents” by the Govern-
K merit. This bank has always made it
K a rule to keep on hands much more
■ z cash than the Government requires.
I first National Bank
■ Under Suptrvhoen ♦/ tbt United Stattt Government
construction.
He says the plans are for an ideal
church, and it will be one of the
handsomest and most convenient
church building he has ever seen. He
did not know just when work of con
struction would begin, but stated that
the W’ork would begin as soon as the
contract was let.
Natural Gas Near Warren.
Warren, Oct. 7.—Considerable ex
citement has been caused here by the
announcement of the discovery of
natural gas at Vick, a small town in
the southern part of this county, and
arrangements have already been
made for the organization of a com
pany for the purpose of boring wells.
PROF. PICKENS IS
REAPPOINTED AS
COUNTY EXAMINER
Popular County Examiner Named
For Fifth Term—Has Served
County Eight Years.
Prof. Sidney Pickens was on Mon
day reappointed as county examiner
of Independence county by Judge
Craig. This is one of the most popu
lar official acts of the present coun
ty judge, and will reflect credit on
his administration.
Prof. Pickens was first appointed
to this position in 1904 by Judge
Lindsey, and again in 1906 by Judge
Wycough. His administration of
school affairs was so pleasing to the
people of the county, and especially
those deeply interested in the schools,
that Judge Wycough appointed him
. r ain in 1908, and in 1910 Judge
’’earce appointed him to the same
position, making eight years in all
’hat Prof. Pickens has served as ex
aminer.
It is safe to say that there is not
a man in the state of Arkansas who
enjoys greater popularity among
the people he serves, than does Prof.
Pickens. He was unanimously en
dorsed as examiner by the county
institute that met here some weeks
ago, for the position, and it is very
likely if the position was an elective
one and he aspired to fill it, he could
do so as long as he desired without
opposition from any source.
His work in the Batesville schools i
has been just as efficient and his I
popularity as an instructor is not
less than his popularity as an organ- ‘
izer and executive.
The county is fortunate in having'
a man of the splendid combined tal
ents as are possessed by him, and
the schools of the city and county
are made better by his services. j
BATESVILLE, ARKANSAS, TUESDAY EVENING, OCTOBER 8, 1912.
BOYS:
<| Every boy is a minature business man.
If he manages his little business affairs
with credit to himself, he will be a good man
ager of big affairs later in life.
<f The best way in the world for a boy to bj
come a good manager is to have a Savings
Account, think twice before spending, and
keep the account growing.
This bank wants to be a “partner” in the
business affairs of every sturdy, sensible boy in
Independence county by helping him to save
The First Cash Prize for the best kept bus
iness record to be shown at the Boys' Demon
stration Club next month, is offered by this
bank with the view of assisting these boys
along the line indicated.
(f We hope to enroll the names of every
member of the Boys’ Corn Club in our Savings
Department by the time the present crop is
gathered and marketed, and would be glad to
show them in person the many ways in which
we can help them.
UNION BANK AND TRUST CO.
BATESVILLE, ARK.
“On the corner opposite the Court House"
J. E. Rosebrough, President.
D. D. Adams, Vice-Pres. C. D. Metcalf, Cashier.
E. H. Glenn, Vice-Pres. Albert Sims, Asst. Cash.
State News Briefs
No State Rifle Shoot. .
Little Rock, Oct. 8. —Gov. Don
aghey and Adjt.-Gen. Green have
decided to hold no state rifle shoot at
Fort Logan H. Roots, as has been
done for the last three years. It
was to have been held October 14-20,
by the captain and five men from
each company of the Guard. It
would have cost about $4,000, and it
was decided that the finances of the
Guard would not warrant the outlay, ■
Corporation Matters.
Little Rock, Oct. B.—The follow
। ing new corporations have been
i chartered:
I City Realty Co., Pine Bluff, $6,000
capital, all subscribed; J. S. Ingram,
president; J. T. Lloyd, vice president;
I W. N, Trulock, secretary-treasurer.
! Huffaker Mercantile Co., general
merchandise, Russell; $20,000 capital,
subscribed; G. B. Huffaker, presi
dent; J. A. Roetzel, vice president;
Ed Lea, secretary-treasurer.
1 Stamps Gin Co., Stamps; SIO,OOO
.capital, $5,200 subscribed; W. B.
, Hinton, president; J. A. Drake, vice
' president; A. P. Beasley, secretary
treasurer.
Fanners and Merchants Bank,
Amity; $25,000 capital, $15,000 sub
scribed; Hanson J. Marks, president;
H. B. Griffis and W. W. Watson,
vice presidents; John W. Thompson,
secretary-treasurer. i
Farmers Bank, Olvey, SIO,OOO cap
ital, $5,000 subscribed; J. P. Harmon,
president; Alfred Ross, vice presi
dent; L. A. Biggs, cashier.
The Rogers Chemical Cd. of Rog
ers gave notice of dissolution, being
insolvent, and having sold all its as
sets to E. J. Hess of Kansas City for
$2,500, which enabled the company
j to pay its debts.
Penitentiary Board Holds Meeting.
Little Rock, Oct. B.—The peniten
tiary board transferred Park Hunter,
aged 18 years, of Howard county,
from the penitentiary to the reform
school. He had been sentenced to
five years for accessory to murder.
The board also transferred John As
kew of Union county from the peni
, tentiary to the insane asylum, on the
statement of the physician that he is
; insane. I
John Wesley Strother of Chicago,
I five years for murder, and Will
1 daines of Crittenden, two years for ]
1 assault, were granted paroles. Also.
Jim Sellers of Saline, who has served '
three years for murder.
Wadley Goes to Little Rock.
Little Rock, Oct. 7.—The executive
committee of the Pulaski County
Fair has engaged J. L. Wadley of
Hot Springs as general superintetid
i ent of the fair. Mr. Wadley afll
devote hh ostbe time to the wo*
। and will report for duty Wednesday
morning. Mr. Wadley has had ex
perience in conducting fairs, and the
correspondence between him and C.
C. Kirkpatrick, acting for the com
mittee, closed this morning when a
letter was received from Mr. Wad
ley accepting the proposition made
to him. He recently made a big sue- .
cess of the White county fair.
Mrs. Dilahunty Killed.
। Yellville, Oct. 7.—While John W.
Dillahunty and his wife were driving
from their home at Gassville in
Baxter county to visit their daugh
ter, Mrs. J. F. Carson of this city,
the team became frightened and
started to run. Mrs. Dillahunty
made an attempt to jump from the
wagon, but instead fell, striking her
head against a rock, rendering her
unconscious. She lived only a few
hours and died from the effect of the
injuries sustained.
1 ———
Negro Oliphint Shot Dies.
1 Little Rock, Oct. 7.—lnformation
charging him with the murder of
James Sheppard, a negro, was this
morning filed against Gardner Oli
phint, a well known young court
stenographer, in the court of Justice
of the Peace E. H. Sanders, by Dep
uty Prosecuting Attorney M. E. Dun
away.
I At present Oliphint is not in the
city, having gone with his attorney,
Lewis Rhoton, yesterday to Para
, gould to act as stenographer in a
case in which Mr. Rhoton is inter
ested.
Oliphint shot Sheppard Saturday
night, near Sixth and Center streets,
after a short exchange of words be
tween the two, and will make the
plea of self-defense.
I
Henry Rush Dies at Evening Shade.
Evening Shade, Oct. 7.—Henry
Rush, the young man living near
this place who had his right hand
an darm shot to pieces by the acci
dental discharge of a shotgun two
weeks ago, died Saturday.
Physicians amputated the young
man's arm and he seemed to be get
ting along well, when tetanus devel-
i oped, after which he only lived a
day or two. Young Rush was only
18 years of age and a very popular
। young gentleman.
Report of Baptist Meeting.
I Editor Guard—The North Arkan
i sas Baptist Association of General
I Baptists convened with Mt. Zion Gen
i eral Baptist church, near Batesville,
’ Ark., on Friday before the first Sun-
day in October, 1912. They had a
large, splendid delegation of gentle
rmen and ladies, good Christians,
: workers that represented will their
calling in proclaiming their Master's
Kingdom, rightly dividing the words
of truth. They administered the Sac
rament and washing of the saints
feet on Saturday night. There was
a large congregation to witness the
solemn scene, and I hope many hearts
were touched with the finger of God’s
love. Six or seven ministers attend
ed the association, and were able
ministers. Those ministers were cer
tainly guideposts on the footpath of
peace, for the possessed kindness of
heart and gentleness of manners.
C. W. Laneer.
Can any of the politicians name
all the electors of the state of Ar
kansas off-hand?
LIEUT. BECKER
NOW ON TRIAL
FOR BIS LIFE
I
State Hopes to Convict Officer As the
Man Responsible For the Mur
der of Rosenthal.
New York, Oct. B.—The death of
“Big Jack" Zelig,” although a severe
blow to the prosecution, caused no
change in the opening yesterday of
the trial of Police Lieutenant Charles
Becker, charged with the murder of
the gambler, Herman Rosenthal. The
250 talesmen, from which a jury will
be picked, reported early at the crim- I
inal courts building and crowds
swarmed through the corridors to see
Becker brought across the Bridge of
Sighs from the Tombs.
Selection of a grand jury to in-'
vestigate all the phases of the Rosen
thal case occupied Justice Goff prior ।
to the start of the Becker trial and
the examination of talesmen would.
not begin until after 11 o’clock. How
long it will take to get a jury is a j
matter of conjecture.
The most rigid inquiry on the part;
of the police and the district at- j
torney’s office has brought to light j
nothing to indicate that Zelig was;
killed to defeat the ends of justice. :
Davidson, his slayer, appears to have
been actuated solely by a desire for |
personal revenge on the man he says
robbed him. However, it was a re- ’
markable coincidence, for through I
Zelig the state hoped to show that |
henchmen, retained by “Bald Jack”'
Rose, shot Rosenthal at Becker’s bid- j
ding.
When the Becker case was called i
Judge Goff promptly denied a motion i
of Mr. Mclntyre for a postponement
because of the illness of his asstet-1
ant, John W. Hart.
Yon Can’t Afford To
Take A Chance
WHEN YOU BUY DRUGS, NINE TIMES
OUT OF TEN SOMEBODY IS SICK, AND
WHEN THEY ARE YOU CAN’T AFFORD TO
'TAKE A CHANCE.
YOU WANT THE MEDICINE; YOU WANT
IT RIGHT AWAY, AND ABOVE ALL YOU
WANT IT TO BE RIGHT WHEN IT COMES.
WE ARE SKILLED IN THE ART OF COM
POUNDING PRESCRIPTIONS, WE ARE AC
CURATE, WE ARE PROMPT.
OUR GOODS ARE ALL NEW, FRESH
AND PURE.
YOU TAKE NO CHANCE IF YOU SEND
HERE FOR YOUR DRUGS.
THE CASH DRUG CO.
AH UK SaMries AM ToNd Accessories I
NUMBER 118.
CLARK CHANGES
HIS FLEA OF NOT
GUILTY TO GUILTY
Edward Clark Confesses that He Was
Implicated in the Dynamite Con
spiracy at Indianapolis.
Indianapolis, Ind., Oct. 7.—Edward
Clark of Cincinnati today pleaded
guilty to the government’s charges in
the dynamite conspiracy.
As soon as court opened District
Attorney Miller addressed Federal
Judge Anderson.
“If it pleases the court, the defend
ant, Clark, of Cincinnati, wishes to
change his plea from not guilty to
guilty.
Clark then stepped forward.
“Do you plead guilty?” asked
Judge Anderson.
“I plead guilty,” said Clark.
The prisoner was then separated
from the other forty-five defendants
and taken to jail to await the impos
ing of his sentence. Clark pleaded
guilty to all the charges—five counts
of conspiracy and fifty counts of be
ing a principal to the actual illegal
interstate shipment of dynamite and
nitro glycerine.
Clark was business agent and presi
dent of local union No. 44 of the In
ternational Association of Bridge and
Structural Iron Workers from Janu
ary, 1908, to July, 1911. His activ
ities in promoting explosions, Mr.
Miller asserted, were carried on
through letters written by Frank M:
Ryan, president of the union, and the
McNamaras. An ivory-handled um
brella bearing the initials “E. C.,”
found in the wreckage of a dynamited
bridge at Dayton, Ohio, Mr. Miller
said, led to the disclosure that Clark
actually had caused the explosion,
having used the umbrella to protect
the dynamite and then leaving it be
hind.
ATTRACTIVE SHOW WINDOW.
Barnett's Appeal to the Hunter With
An Array of Fine Guns Srown.
One of the show windows at Bar
nett’s is enough to make any man
want to go to the woods and hunt a
while. They have very attractively
displayed the very fine line of guns,
and plenty of ammunition to go with
them.
Pictures of rural scenes with quail
and duck and other game make this
window a very attractive advertise
ment, almost as good an ad as theirs
in today’s Guard telling about these
things.

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