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The Nevada County picayune. (Prescott, Ark.) 190?-current, May 30, 1918, Image 5

Image and text provided by Arkansas State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90050306/1918-05-30/ed-1/seq-5/

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Stomach Troubles
Since Childhood
PERUNA Made Me WeU f
1 Now
Enjoy
The Best
of
Health |
f
Mr. Wm. W. Evcrly, 3325 North
Hancock Street, Philadelphia, Pa.,
writes: i
“I have been troubled with stomach
disorders since childhood, but after
taking six bottles of your Peruna, I
now enjoy the best of health. I also
had catarrh in the head, which prac
tically has disappeared, thanks*to
the Peruna Co. for their good work.”
Those who object to liquid modi*
eines ean procure Peruna Tablets, —'
I LOCALS |
For Sale-A good Ford touring
car Dr. A. A. Reeder.
Pasture for stock—Alfalfa hay
for sale. S. D. Heddie,
Prescott, Phone 280.
A car load of Columbus wag
ons received.
W. K. Buchanan.
We make loans on liberal term?
on improved rea! estate.
R. L. Blakely. |
Office Phone 32b i
Break your Cold ^ or LaGrippr,
with a few doses of 666.
Do you need a new wagon .
Let me sell you a Columbus.
W. K. Buchanan,
Some good second-hand sewing
machines at Rex Furniture Co.
Mr. and Ers. W. A Smith of
Thornton, were in the city last
week.
Phone 101 your drug wants.
Guthrie Drug Store pays the pos
tage.
If you have Chills or Malaria get
50c bottle of Sanol Chill Tonic nothing
better for chills and malaria. Get it
at Hesterly Drug Store.
John Rogers of Elkhart. Tex
as, is spending a few days in
Arkansas.
Jar. L. Dickerson from Camp
Jackson, was home for a few
days this week.
Wanted —A few more bushels
of cotton seed to finish out a car.
A. G. Stuart, Prescott.
For Sale—One McCormick!
binder in good repair, on C. C.,
Calhoun’s place. W. S. Jones.,
Wanted—Cotton seed and ICO
pound feed sacks. ,T. C. Woodul.
Farmers Uuion Warehouse.
Sallow complexion is due to a torpid
liver Herbine purities and strength
ens the liver and bowels and restores
the rosy bloom of health to the cheek.
Price t>0c Sold by Guthrie Drug
Store.
COLUMBIA
GRAFONOLAS I
Here is your opportunity to get a fine, new, latest model ^
Grafonola — in a way you can easily afford. We are offering |
these instruments on terms as iow as $3. Down, $3. Monthly. |
1
Columbia Grafonola
r’RICE $18.00
$3.00 Down
i $3.00 Monthly.
Columbia Grafonola
PRICE $30.00
$5.00 Down,
$5 00 Monthly.
Columbia Grafonola
PUCE $45X0
$7.50 Down,
$5.00 Monthly.
Prescott Hardware Co. I
D. W. Hollaway of Diboll,
Texas, is visiting relatives in
and around Prescott and Ros:
ton.
The best of drug store goods,
the best of drug store service.
Guthrie Drug Store, The Rexall
Store.
We car* save you big money on
a sewing machine.
Rex Furniture Co.
J. L, Daniel, one of our young
farmers out on 2, left a very
fine turnip at this office one day
last week.
Mr. Dickenson out on route 3.
was in the city one day last week
selling cabbage. He was show
ing some very fine ones.
A few sewing machines as good
as new. Rex Furniture Co.
Do you know SanolChill Tonic knocks
the Chills and all Malaria Fevers. Get
a 50c Trial Bottle at Hesterly Drug
Score.
I will examine all who expect
to teach in the public shcools of
this county in Prescott, June 20
and 21. C. W. Hirst,
County Examiner.
rime tionea say9 everytmng is
all 0. K. in his community.
Good crops, ail up with work and
watermelon vines are running.
Good.
Don’t forget to buy Thrift
Stamp? and War Savings Stamps
a you pass aiong.
When you have Backache the liver
or kidney 3 are sure to be out of gear.
Try Sanol, it does wonders for the liv
er, kidneys and bladder A trial 50c
bottle will convince you. Get it at Hes
3rly drug store
Stray .d—From my place near
iiosston last Thursday, one dark
orown mare mule, about 15
hands high, about 7 years old
Wire cut on left fore leg nea:
shoulder—needs shearing badly.
Will pay iiberal reward for her
recovery. C. B. Butcher,
Route 3
WATCH IRISH
POTATO MARKET
Harvest at the Right Time and Handle
Your Crop Carefully.
Uy J. S. Knox, Horticulturist, Exten
sion Division, University of Arkan
sas.
The present indications are that the
Irish potato c#op in Arkansas will he
considerably above the average. This
being the case and knowing that there
are still large quantities of the North
ern grown crop still in storage, it be
comes evident that if we expect to
market our crop with profit we must
exercise the greatest care in the har
vesting, grading and shipping of our
crop.
Care Necessary at Time of Harvest.
Watch the market and do not dig
the potatoes until mature unless the
demand is good and the prices high.
Remember, digging must be done as
soon us the crop is mature, but that
mature potatoes if handled right will
keep longer and, therefore, can be
marketed slowly and with more profit
than if they had to be put on a poor
market because they were dug too
soon and would not keep Exercise
the greatest cure in the handling of
'lie crop at time of harvest and if it
e n be avoided do not dig the crop
when the soil is wet because this
causes the soil to adhere to the tub
ers and increases the chance of
bruises and, consequently, rotting. If
you can afford to do so, use a potato
digger for harvesting the crop. These
are made in such a way that when
i lie soil is in proper condition they
will leave almost ail of the potatoes
in sight. Do not dig the potatoes an 1
leave them exposed to the sun any
longer than it can be helped, employ
ing. if possible, enough help to keep
them picked up as ituo. as they are
dug.
Grade the Potatoes Properly.
If w»» expect to receive a retnunera
live price for our potatoes this year
it is absolutely necessary that we
have them properly graded. The Bu
reau of Markets of the U. 3. Depart
ment of Agriculture urges the adop
lion of the following grades;
U. S. Grade No. 1.
“This grade shall consist of sound
potatoes of similar varietal character
istics which are practically free from
dirt, or other foreign matter, frost in
jury, sunburn, second growth, cuts,
scab, blight, dry rot and damage caus
ed by insect, disease or mechanical
means. The minimum diameter of pe
'atoes of round varieties shall be 1 7 8
aches and of potatoes of long varie
ties 1 3-4 inches, in order to allow
i >r variations incident to commercial
f ading and handling, ftve^r centum
y weight of any lor may be under
he prescribed siee and. in addition,
hr*M peacentum by weight of any
neb let may be below the remaining
:>-quip^MBnts of this grade."
U. 8. Grade Neu ■.
"This grade shall consist of pota
toes of similar varietal characteris
es whieto are practically free from
frost, injury and decay, and which are
.fee from serious damage caused by
lift or other foreign matter, sunburn,
econd growth, cuts, s^fe, blight, dry
it. or other disease, Bsects or me
li.mical means. The minimum diam
N»r shall be 1 14 inches. In order
> allow for variations incident to
mimercial grading and handling, five
. > -r centum by weighi of any lot may
under the size mentioned and. In
tdition, five per centum by weight
' any such lots may be below the
:4'-uaintng requirements of this
•.••ade.”
The above grades point out clearly
) us just what is to be expected of
ir growers this season and unless we
leasure up to the requirements prices
ay be unusually low.
itek Potatoes Properly—Leeks Mean
a •eat Deal.
Finally, after the potatoes have
eu graded they must be put in .1
•at, clean sack. All sacks should be
tactically new and of llm same slae.
tatoes from Arkansas are often car
d to the cars for shipping in any
•:d every kind of each 'h.u can he
-ked up and a* a result they make
bad ippenrauoe on the market. Do
ot make tins mistake, for if the po
toes have been graded properly and
n pieced in clean bags of the same
the appearance will be far better
;d, consequently, a better price will
> paid tor them. It is well to be
minded of a certain buyer In the
ort Smith section Iasi season who
ictight a carload of potatoes at 91.16
■. bushel. He had the potatoes plac
d in new bags of equal slae and then
otsold them right on the yard for 86
onts a bushel more than he paid for
lit in. The few extra cents that may
■ome from proper grading and pack
ng or sacking may raaea the differ'
.■nee between profit and loss
Arkansas has a big crop of potatoes.
I jet us fry to put them up in such a
way as to secure the beet price for
them. Talk this over with the mMir
tiers of your association and write to
the Bureau of Market*. Old State
house, Utile Ruck. Ark, for sugges
tions and help in marketing your crop.
PROOUCI IMHUTTIL* EGGS AMO
PRBSCRVB IMWATW* GLASS.
Begin now to kin the roosters. In
fertile eggs keep better. Help feed the
soldiers by removing the local de
mand for meat Preserve eggs In
water flags.
NO EIGHT HOUR
LAW IN TRENCHES
PRAISE FOR AMERICANS
Lieutenant Sharman, Canadian Officer,
Who Speaks at Chautauqua, Is
Brilliant Orator.
Lieutenant Sharman, Canadian offi
cer, who s[>eaks at the Chautauqua,
asked some pointed questions in his
Liberty Loan addresses which he
made Just before starting on his Chau
tauqua tour.
What would they do on the western
front if a strike occurred among the
fighting men?
What would they do if the ambu
lance drivers struck?
How fast would we progress under
an eight-hour law?
These are among the quest!''" <
which the fighter leaves for his audi
ences to answer for themselves.
Recently Lieutenant Sharman spoke
in Birmingham, Ala., and the "Age
Herald" said:
Lieutenant Sharman was greeted
with vociferous applause as he arose,
the gifted Canadian officer, who has
returned from the beitlefields after
being wounded twice, has a vast store
f war narratives that interested bis
audience immediately. He is an adept
telling stories of the life of a sol
der at the front, in the trenches or
in the hospitals. He has a wonderful
i ersonnlity and outbursts of applause
were frequent during his address.
“The time has come when either
war or civilization must cease. Today
'here are machine guns on our front
for even- machine gun on the German
front, and those on the Allies’ side are
■ lie best in the world.
“The spirit of comradeship has
sprung up and improved so much that
interest and co-operation extends
throughout the ranks of all armies,
for when a man has taken his dead
comrade’s coat and slept in it, has
eaten his ration after he has gone,
and then piled the dead bodies of his
comrades around him as a protection
from bullets, there is bound to be a
feeling that will not cease as long a*
life lasts.
"This North American continent
produces such men as the Germans
have never seen before. They are not
aware of what they are up against.
And it remains for America to win
this .war, for North Ameriea has pro
duced the type of men who will wia
this war "
He held his audience In rapt atten
tion. gliding from the serious to the
humorous, then back to the realities
of modern, stubborn, mam-killing war
tare with suet ease and oratory that
every man and woman sat thrilled,
until the keynota'was reached in each
eltanax then patriotic fervor was un
loosed with reckless abandon. i
Astonishing Record at Return Kates.
More than one million i>«cg>ie in the
United States and Canada have paid
(o bear Brooks Fletcher again and
again. He goes back to ihe same
towns over and over, year after year.
He fills more return dates than any
other orator on the platform at the
present time. The return date is the
one big and final argument to com
mittees at experience and business
judgment.
Rut look at Brooks Fletcher's out
standing subjects:
“Tragedies of the Unprepared.”
"The Martyrdom of Fools.”
“Community I teadheads.”
“Who Is Youpr Hero?”
“The Modern Judas.”
and
“Who Is Your Hero?"
He will deliver one of these at oar
chautaafL
■' --
I——' 1 — ■■ - — * 1 —"1
ROBERT L. FINCH,
Who Cornea to Chautauqua.
Robert L. Finch, given the title of
Captain during hie experience in
France as a member of the American
Red Croea Commission, received a
copy of The New York Herald the
other day which a friend had sent
him The picture had been snapped by
a Hereld photographer in Paris, un
known to Mr. Finch. Under the pic
ture—which shows a French lady
walking by Mr. Finch's side- wae the
description. “An American army offi
cer assisting refugees in their flight
trom the war-stricken areas.”
The best wa^on made, the
Columbus. W. K. Buchanan.
WKm you Heao hot
M WO#r*Y - TREY 4*E.
/ I TROROUGml Y REL /ABLE
V4/VO CO'VF’ETERT —
If your eyes trouble you don’t put off having them
examined.
Delays are dangerous and neglect may cause perma
nent eye trouble.
We will examine vour eyes and charge you nothing;
you merely pay the cost of the glasses if glasses
are necessary; if they are not you may rely on us
to tel! you so.
For correct time, phone us. Phor.e No. 369.
SUMMER TERM 1918
STATE AGRICULTURAL SCHOOL
Magnolia, Arkansas
Summer Term closes. August 23.
Fall Term begins August 27.
School in session every’ month in the year.
COURSES OFFERED:
Agriculture, animal husbandry, common
school subjects, high school subjects, domes
tic science, domestic arts, shop, including
wood, iron and machine, book-keeping, piano,
voice, expression, teachers’ training, short
courses for farmers, short courses in home
science for women i
, i
You are invited to spend the summer here.
E. E. AUSTIN, Principal.
I
A WAR CHAUTAUQUA.
Editorial In Cleburne (Tex.) More
.ns Review: Cleburne is to have her
hautauqua this summer aa usual.
This is as it should he. It has the
iirect and unqualified -approval of
President Wilsotf, Secretary McAdoo
uid other government officials. The
President told Mr Horuer ttnt It
would be a “oalamlty” to call off the
Chautauquas over the United Statea.
Secretary McAdoo said we need a
mobilization of minds as much aa we
lo of men and munitions.
Our Chautauqua, therefore, this year
will be dedicated to the winning of
Jie war. War, now, is our chief busi
ness. Anything that pertains to the
winning of the war is or should be,
interesting to us all. Men and women
ire coming to us this season with a
living, breathing message about the
war. These people will bring, in many
instances, first hand knowledge, thrill
ing end Interesting. There will also
>e, of course, plenty entertainment to
ers parsed. It Is Important that every
thing, so far as possible, go on as be
fore the war. Certainly this should
be true of the Chautauqua.
Fine location in 40* acre9 in
Prescott School District all
cleared, fenced and cross fenced.
Small 5 roomed house, large barn.
Price $40.00 per acre. Terms.
Moore and Martin.
When the baby takes too much food
• the stomach turns; the result is indi
gestion, sourness and vomiting. Fre
quently the bowels are involved and
there ia colicpaina and diarrhea. Mo •
Gee's Baby Elixir ia a grand corrective
remedy for the stomach and bowel dis
orders of babies. It is pure, whole
some and pleasant to take. Price 25c
and 50c per bottle. Sold by Guthrie
Drug Store.
Fcr Sale—One Deering Binder,
food as new, with tongue truck*.
Cheap forca3h. Frank Hines,
Route 2
C. H. Jones of Bodcaw, was in
the city Wednesday.
For a good second hand sewing
machine see Rex Furniture Co.
C. H. Walls and son, W. C.
Walls, and H. B. Price, ail of
Paris. Texas, were in the city a
few days last week visiting re.u
tives.
Surgeons agree that in cases of Cnfs,
Burns, Bruises, and Wounds, the fi -st
treatment is most important Wh-n
an efficient antiseptic is applied prompt
ly. there is no danger of infection and
the wound begins to heal at once. F t
use on man or beast, Borozone is the
ideal Antiseptic and Healing Agent.
Buy it now and be ready for an emer
gency. Price 25c, 50c, $1.00 and $1.50.
Sold by Guthrie Drug Store.
The
Advertised
Article
ia one in which the mer
chant himself has implicit
faith—else he will not ad
vertise it. You are safe in
patronizing the mer
chants whose ads appear
in this paper because their
goods are up to date and
not shop worn. : : :

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