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The Nevada County picayune. (Prescott, Ark.) 190?-current, May 04, 1922, Image 4

Image and text provided by Arkansas State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90050306/1922-05-04/ed-1/seq-4/

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iNettaiia (Tit. fJtrawutu
PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY
H. F. Hki-TON_Manage
Gao. R. Munn.-.Auutan
SUBSCRIPTION
One Year_.._ *E0
Six Month*_ •*'
TELEPHONES
Picayune Office..-23!
H. F. Helton’a Residence-1"'
Geo. R. Munn’* Residence-406 21
Entered at the Poet Office at Prescott
Arkansas, as second-class mail matter.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
FOR CHANCELLOR
We are authorized to announce C. E
Johnson of Ashdown. as a candidate toi
Chancellor of the Sixth Chancery Distric’
subject to the action of the Democratic
primary.
FOR CIRCUIT CLERK AND RECORDER
We are authorized to announce F.d S.
Gladden a* a candidate for the office of Circuit
Clerk and Recorder, subject to the action of
the Democratic primary.
We are authorized to announce Fred Fuller
a* a candidate for the office of Circuit Clerk
and Recorder, subject to the action of the
Democratic primary.
We are authorized to announce E. H. (Ep)
Weaver as a candidate for the office of Circuit
Clerk and Recorder, subject to the action of
the Democratic primary.
We are authorized to announce A E. Mc
Guire of Missouri Township, a* a candidate
for the office of Circuit Cicrk and Recorder
of Nevada county, subject to the action of
the Democratic primary.
FOR SHERIFF AND COLLECTOR
We are authorized to announce Sam E.
Munn as a candidate for the office of Sheriff
and Collector of Nevada county, subject to
the action of the Democratic primary.
We are authorized to announce Blake
Dalrymple as a candidate for the office of
Sheriff and Collector of Nevada County, sub
ject to the action of the Democratic primary.
We are autorized to announce Henry D.
Holloway as a candidate for the office of
Sheriffi and Collector of Nevada county, sub
ject to the action of the Democratic primary.
We are authorized to announce John Daley
Parker as a candidate for the office of Sheriff
and Collector of Nevada County, subject to
the action of the Democratic primary.
We are authorized to announce Clyde Cox
as a candidate for the office of Sheriff and
Collector of Nevada county, subject to the
action of the Democratic primary.
FOR COUNTY AND PROBATE JUDGE
We are authoried to announce O. R. Mc
Daniel a* a candidate for the office of County
and Probate Judge of Nevada county, subject
to the action of the Democratic primary.
We are authorized to announce J. M
Thomas as a candidate for the office of County
and Probate Judge of Nevada County, sub
ject to the action of the Democratic primary.
We are authorized to announce E. T.
Kennedy of Bodcaw a- u candidate for the
office of County and Probate Judge of Nevada
county, subject to the action of the Democra
tic primary.
BROTHERHOOD OF MAN NEEDED
The present great coal strike is only
one more evidence Hint what the world
needs more Hum anything else is a
Brotherhood of Man spirit. With all
the wars, animosities, hatreds, racial
feuds, class wrangles, and all that, b>
say nothing of the profiteering and
other forms of banditry going on
everywhere, there was never less evi
dence of any such spirit, but that is
no sign there ought not to be. Probably
this advocacy of such a spirit will be
laughed at and derided as out of date
and altogether old fashioned, but that
will in no way detract from the fact
that Christ’s advocacy of it two thou
sand years ago is just as potent today
«s then. Absolutely nothing is need
ed so much in the whole world today
as Brotherhood of Man. And there
is absolutely nothing which can talc
its place.
The coal operators and coal miners
hate each other, and both act much
like they hated the general public.
Certainly there is no sign of brother
hood evidenced by either. But a real
ization of that beneficent principle
would end their strife at once, and
there is no reason why they should
not exercise it. The I'nited States
Steel Corporation, the railroads ami
the big banks of the country own so
per cent of alt our coal mines. They
are all rich and powerful. A few mil
lions of dollars would not make any
different** to them, if they would only
realize it. Yet they not only rob all
the people by exorbitant prices for the
coal but seek also to grind down those
who do all the hard work at a low
wage. The miners are, taken as a
whole, very ignorant foreigners, and
there is therefore more excuse for
them than there is for the operators
who are educated, enlightened, ox
perieneed men and know better If
each would extend the hand of fellow
ship and brotherhood to each other,
and the public, all would protit by it
and do well and prosper. Why don't
they realize this fact? Why is it that
human greed and selfishness is sc
much stronger than the spirit of right
and justice? God grant that It b«
not always so. $
k DEPORT ALIEN BOOTLEGGERS
A California Federal judge makes
the assertion that nine out of every
ten convictions before his court for the
’ violation of the liquor laws of the
country have been bv aliens who are
not even citizens of the United States,
and that all such people mistake lib
j ert.v fiu license. This is easily veri
fied by a jierusal of the newspapers
from day to day. the list of names of
! those arrested for bootlegging nearly
1 always being those of foreigners.
Following in the footsteps of these
facts now comes Congress and passes
a bill for the deportation of all un
naturalized foreigners convicted for
violation of the liquor or narcotic laws
<»f the country, and the measure is now
uo to the Senate. The bill was bit
terly fought in the House, but passed
by a hig majority. It is entirely just
and proper. The breaking of our laws
by people of foreign birth who do not
ev n have loyalty enough to the coun
try of their addition to become citi
zens of if lias gone to such an extreme
that drastic action is necessary, and
deportation cf si eh persons back to
the slums from which they came is
the only remedy that will have any
effect in curbing their inherited law
breaking propensities. They do not
fear fines or imprisonment half as
much as they d<> deportation, and the
shipping of a few thousands of them
back across the seas will put fear
into the hearts of millions of others
; as nothing else will.
If we went to any foreign country
we would certainly endeavor to con
form to the laws of that country,
whether wv liked them or not, and
if we could not do so we should leave
the country, or expect to made to leave
by the law abiding element of those
who did respect ami live up to their
laws. The average foreigner who
comes to our shores of recent years
has little respect for our laws or in
stitutions. He i- here to better bis
financial condition, and he does not
scorn to care much how he gets the
money, just so long as he gets it.
This ln-s of memory stunt i?. getting
to he overworked. A chap wakes up
in some other town and •an’t pay his
! hotel I>ill iieeause he don't know what
his name is or where he came from,
or why. In “the good old days" men
list'd to frequently be that way the
rie^t morning after the night before,
and we have an idea that is what is
1 the matter with a lot of these modern
geeks whose memory is only an inch
long.
The light wines asked for by the
wets would get heavy if legalized.
MONEY IS ETROPE'S GOD
The average European thinks raore
of a dollar than an American does of
a thousand, and they are not at all
scrupulous about how they get the
dollars either. That is the reason thev
have always been at war with each
other. Their philosophy has ever been
that war was justified by the plunder
and loot it afforded and the territory
that could be grabbed because of it.
Prussia. Russia and Austria split up
Poland and wiped if off the map for
no other reason than national Imr
ulary. Napoleon was one of the great
est public thiefs history has ever
known: so was Caesar, ltismarck, the
Ilohenzollerns. the Hapsbnrgs, and
every other pirate against civilization.
HAMBONE’S MEDITATIONS
f——-----——
WEN A WtAN HITCH HE CHEER
RIGHT CLOSE OP TO YoO
El HE STAHT T TALK ,
YOU DON' KNOW tF HE
GOT SUtfPN T' TELL YOU
ER SUMPN T' SELL You!
j
■*
'•TTVfc* • .V
V;!v' V:;'
Copyright 1922 Hart Schaffner & Marx
Good clothes are economical clothes
f They last longer; you buy less often;
they hold their shape and look better
while you’re wearing them. We sell
rx-hlig but fine quality: Hart
Scha*tner & Marx clothes; we sell
them because they’re best for you— /
that makes them best for us.
SEE THE NEW STYLES
4-button coats 2-button models
The new Norfolks New styles for
3-button sacks business men
Look them over Belted coats
ALL THE GOOD ONES ARE HERE
j We Will Save You Money
JOE BOSWELL
THE CLOTHIER
The home of Hart Schaffner A Marx clothes
peace atul honesty. Money and what
money stands for has always been
their God, aud is today. Take note of
the foreigners in this country, and
watch them squeeze the dollar. Most
of them will get rich where an Ameri
can would starve. He sella da bunan
and shinu da shoe; the blackhaml
means blackmail, and it all means “get
the money.”
We get a fine illustration in the re
cent roar put up by the Allies about
the l uited States being paid for keep
ing its army on the Rhine. Ail the
rest of them demanded and got such
payment, but for us to ask the same
oh, my! What has our armed force
been doing there? Nothing in the
world but protecting the rights of
corny of the whole world. Europe
war in the first place We had no
business butting into it, speaking from
a financial standpoint, but we did so
tin the interest of the peace and de
cency of the whole world. Europe
would have been a living, breathing
hell upon earth today if we had not
gone to their aid, yet the minute we
demand an expense account, the same
as they have done, or dare hint that
they better pay us at least the interest
upon the eleven billions of dollars we
loaned the beggars when death stared
them iu tiie face, they throw one tit
after another. In the face of all these
disagreeable facts oue is forced to be
lieve that national honor, integrity,
honesty, manhood aud common de
cency are all secondary to the nations
across the seas to money, pelf, plunder
and pirated power.
How comes it that the price of coal
raises from two or three dollars per
ton at the mouth of the mine to from
$12 to $20 by the time it reaches the
consumer? That is rank profiteering
and worse it is nothing less than
piracy. And why don’t the Govern
ment do something about it? How
much do the coal barons contribute
toward national campaign expenses of
flic two political parties?
YOUNG MEN ANI) WOMEN ARE
IN DEMAND IN BUSINESS
A country wide investigation of em
ployment conditions to get informa
tion a- to the type of help in greatest
demand showed the following results:
1388 of 2445 advertisements for help
specified a business training, and 524
of the remaining 1107 advertisements
were for position that office assitants
grow into. No other profession can
claim one-fifth as great a demand. In
fact tins proves that there is a great
er demand for business training than
for all other trades and professions.
the average income of a .awyer is
$1500, of a doctor $1800, others in
proportion, while the average income
i f a business man is $.”.000 u year.
There can be no question but that the
business world offers you the best op
portunities.
zY'ou can be sure of success if you
enter the world of business tranted
at the Tvler Commercial College. You
must la* prepared. This is an age of
specialization The trained man gets
the big job aud the big salary. Xyu
■—•-———
must know how to do some one thing
well, that the business man will pay
you for doing. Let us train you in
Bookkeeping. Shorthand, Business Fi
nance, Telegraphy, Cotton Classing,
Typewriting. Salesmanship. Wireless
Telegraphy and Telephony, and we
will secure you u position at a good
salary that will also serve as a step
ping stone to higher tilings.
We have started thousands of other
young people on the road to success
and can help you. Some of our gradu
ates are now drawing salaries of
twenty to twenty-live thousand dolars
a year: we can give you the same
Thorough, Complete and Practical
training that gave them their start, in
a few months time and at a small
cost. The fact that we are the larg
est business training institution in
America, w fh an average annual en
rollment of over 3600 the last five
years, is indisputable evidence as to
the merit of our courses, for not in
ferior school could ever build up aud
hold a lrage patconage.
You are not going to pass up a
Business Training and its wonderful
opportunities to become a day laborer,
house maid, department store clerk,
telephone operator, factory hand, or
live on the hack end of someone else'-)
farm. You can't afford it when you
can spend a few months with us and
make sure your success.
Make up your mind to enter now.
Fill in and mail coupon to Tyler Com
merc’al College, Tyler, Texas, for
large free catalogue
Name _
Address _

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