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The Prescott daily news. (Prescott, Ark.) 1907-1941, August 21, 1919, Image 1

Image and text provided by Arkansas State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90050307/1919-08-21/ed-1/seq-1/

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OLUMr
* ftmatn Dailn Wtm
s xiii—No. no.
PRESCOTT, ARKANSAS, THURSDAY, AUGUST 21, 1919
PRICE FIVE CIjINTS
LAW W SUrrLi
AND DEMAND
Will Settle High Cost of Living,
Says Attorney General—De
clares Economic Law of Price
Cannot He Changed.
Washington, Aug. 20.—Attorney
General Palmer said today there was
evidence that the government cam
paign to reduce the cost of living al
ready was bearing fruit. A promi
nent vegetable packer of Maryland
wrote Mr. Palmer that prices in many
lines were beginning to ease off, as
it became evident that the depart
ment of justice meant business in
announcing that criminal proceedings
against hoarders and profiteers would
be instituted wherever the laws were
violated.
“We want to make clear, however,”
the attorney general said, “that noth
ing we can do can change the im
mutable economic laws on which
prices depend. If we can increase
the supply by greater production and
lessen demand by greater saving on
the part of the people, then the cost
jf-living should come down. We can
help that along by forcing hoarders
to put on the markets food held out
[or an advance in prices and further
by holding up to public scorn or by
prosecuting if congress gives us the
criminal amendment to the food con
trol law, those who are guilty of
trying to exact a greater profit than
is reasonable and just. We are going
to make the market—that is the law
of supply and demand—operate nor
nally instead of artificially.”
The attorney general and Judge
Ames, his assistant, drew distinctions
which they said the public sho-ld re
cognize, between hoarded feed and
stored food. The former is held out
sf the market in greater quantities
than required for the owner’s busi
less, for the purpose of forcing up
he market. The latter is surplus
)eing husbanded from the harvest to
he lean season,
“Not all stored food is hoarded, by
iny means,” Mr. Palmer said, “and
ve are going to be very careful not
o do anybody an injustice or to jeo
lardize the winter supply by forcing
in the market the surplus of the
lummer season.”
Hemstitching done at my home at
’egular prices. Mrs. A. Guthrie,
ihond 76.
Hemstitching- Madhine now installed
it my home. Work promptly and
leatly done. Price 10c per yard. Mrs.
R. White, Jr., phone No. 57. tf
TRY THIS SAVING
PLAN
You young people who want to
save, who know you ought to save,
will find this plan a practical and easy
one to follow.
Cash your pay checks here. Deposit
what you think you can spare in a
Savings Account at 4% interest then
and there.
Saving before spending makes the
saving certain. Saving first is one of
the secrets of having ready money
when needed. Try it.
BANK OF PRESCOTT
Capital. $75,000.00
Surplus. $75,000.00
PRESCOTT, ARKANSAS
rifcfttJES OF SECOND DIVISION PARADE IN NEW YORK
Ii
arc'll i
1,1 ■ .•'cri.Hi! i| vision, (lie doughboys and marines of Chateau Thierry fame, passing through the Victory
n their parade up Fifth avenue, New York.
PREMIUM LIST FOR THE
ARKANSAS CENTENNIAL
Little Rock, Aug. 21.—A tentative
premium list for the Arkansas Cen
tennial, subject to change and en
largement, has been approved by the
executive committee.
The total amount canied in the list
is $6,377. Thei'e are twenty different
classifications, with numerous sub-di
visions under each. Each sub-divi
sion has three prizes. First $10, sec
and $5, third $3.
There is scarcely a product of the
farm that is not provided for.
i
STREET RAILWAY CO. ASKS
PERMIT TO INCREASE FARES
Little Rock, Aug. 21.—There. are
I at least 1400 citizens of Hot Springs
who believe that they should be per
| mitted to pay six cents street railway
'fare. S. E. Dillon, manager of the
Hot Springs Street Railway Com
pany, filed a petition containing that
number of signatures, with the State
Corporation Commission, asking for
an increase. The fonnal application
of the company, it is understood, will
be filed in a few days. The City Com
mission of Hot Springs declined to
approve the petition.
When the company s petition is
filed, it will be required to publish it
twice in the local <*papers. Should
htere be a protest, the commission
will issue an order suspending the
rate until a hearing can be had.
The company will not seek to sur
render its franchise to the city, since
the franchise~(loes not fix a maximum
passenger fare.
DAYLIGHT SAVING
LAW IS REPEALED
Measure is Passed Over the
President’s Veto—Passes in
Senate by Vote of 57 to 19—
Repeal Twice Vetoed.
Washington, Aug. 20.—Repeal of
the daylight savings act was accom
plished today, the Senate voting to
sustain the House in passing the re
peal measure over President Wilson’s
veto. The vote was 57 to 19.
The repeal of the law which now
takes its place among the very few
which have been passed over a presi
dential veto, becomes effective after
the clocks are turned back to normal
in October. It will go down in legis
lative history as one of the very few
measures which have twice been ve
toed by a president and became a law
after all by the vote of more than
two-thirds in both houses of Con
gress.
RESCUING THE DROWNING'
Capt. Frederick C. Mills, field agent,
I life-saving section, Atlantic division of
;he American Ked Cross, and naval
| aviators at various points have been
i giving demonstrations on the- swim*
! ming benches to spread the knowledge
•f Ited Cross methods of resuscitating
,ei-sons almost drowned. The photo
1-aph shows the “lock hold.” applied
(} a person rescued from tin* water.
To Recover Sunken Logs.
To recover from the bottom of Cana
■ lum streams the sunken logs that are
lost while on the way from the log
ging camps to the mills n newly or
ganized corporation will employ ma
chinery specially adapted to the pur
I .,ose instead of the ordinary devices
1 for moving timber, it was an
nounced in Popular Mechanics 5Me
i azlne.
Compressed air ami h(gh pressure
v-ati-r streams will he used to loosen
,i,i. togs. As 10 per emit of the logs
I rut sink and remain embedded for
' various periods without losing their
; xn|ne l>v deterioration, the business
i raising them should prove to he
! one of great commere-l tin porta nee
1 to lumbermen.
Quito So. (
this sleeping henuty st(>pt
fot
hNmv
f^rpnly yt^ars.
MIf thpr6*s anythin." In iIh* beaut.'
that long a sheep orebt tr
utifttl."—i.idi'vvii’.
nap theory,
make anybody
'0*1
I
DEMPSEY AND OTHER ATTRAC
TIONS FOR ESTATE CENTENNIA
Little Rock, Aug. 20.—The return
of Centennial officials from Chicago
brings the news that some of the
finest attractions on the road have
been secured, on option, for the big
celebration in Little Rock in Novem
ber. Among them is Dempsey, the
champion heavyweight of the world,
who has a strong vaudeville company
which is playing to capacity in the
North.
PREPARING APPORTIONMENT
OF SCHOOL FUNDS
J Little Rock, Aug. 21.—The Depart
t ment of Education is preparing to
make the annual apportionment of
i the school funds the first Monday in
September. There are several coun
ties that have not settled yet, and at
least four counties that have not yet
reported their enumeration, so that
it is impossible at this time to an
nounce what the per capital Will be.
Last year it was $2.32, and it is be
lieved it will be nearly $2.50 this year
There is an increase of about 9,000 in
the enumeration and will probably
be an increase of about $150,000 in
the revenues.
U. S. SOLDIERS
PURSUE BANDITS
Aviators Shoot Two Bandits
With Machine Gun—Troopers
Slept in Canyons and on the
Trails.
Marfa, Texas, Aug. 20.—Some
where in Mexico, opposite Candelaria
Texas, American soldiers today con
tinued the pursuit begun yesterday
of bandits who captured and held for
ransom Lieuts. Peterson and Davis,
American avjators, rescued yesterday
after payment of $8,500 in gold to the
bandit leader.
A report was received here today
from Lieut. Estill, pilot, and Lieut.
Cooper, observer, dated Presidio, Tex
as, giving details of firing on their
biplane by the Mexican bandits,
trail the American aviators observed
three Mexicans, mounted, riding
south. The plane swept down low to
investigate.
The bandits opened fixe with rifle
bullets puncturing the wings of the
American machine. Observer Cooper
Ward one horse was observed stand
ing without a rider, t The third horse
man dismounted and, climbing up the
sid^ of the mountain, disappeared.
Nei&er Aviator was hit.
Reports from all troops in the field
in Mexico indicate progress is being
made in searching the mountain can
yons and passes for the bandits who
held Aviators Peterson and Davis.
Four airplanes, which arrived last
night from Fort Bliss, near El Paso,
were to augment the air protection of
the Eighth Cavalry in Mexico today.
1 The rains last night are believed to
have wiped out the trails of the ban
dits, but it was not without its ad
vantages, however, for the softened
than the trails made previous to the
rain. .
Reports from the field in Mexico
today told how the Americans spear
the night in the Mexican mountains.
The troopers slept in canyons, on
trails, wherever they happened to be
when it grew too dark to continue
their pursuit. Sentries were station
ed at entrances to canyons and at
high points on trails to prevent an
ambush or surprise attack.
NOW
\
Off with the old straw hat!
The season’s over, Summer
has gone. Fall is here and
it’s time for a new hat.
We suggest that you decide
T
Y
to wear one of our new Fall
/
style
v
When it comes to style $
there is nothing smarter $
than a “Mallory;” and as f
for quality—there is more
of it than is necessary, but
that is the “Mallory” way $
of making hats.
You’ll like the soft hats and |
' the Derby styles will hold X
your attention, too. They!:;
will be much worn this Fall, jl
. We have the latest styles in !£
the season’s popular colors.
OZAN
MERCANTILE CO.
Y
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