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The Little River news. (Ashdown, Little River County, Ark.) 1897-current, September 23, 1916, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90050316/1916-09-23/ed-1/seq-1/

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New England Bakery
The Best for the Least
Money in town. Phone 124
Little
New England Bakery
First Cash Store in Town
and Cheapest. Phone 124
GRAVES & GRAVES, Editors.
ASHDOWN, LITTLE RIVER COUNTY, ARKANSAS, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 1016.
VOLUME XVIII.
NUMBER 87.
COMPARATIVE STA T EM ENT OF THE
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
OF ASHDOWN, ARKANSAS
i •
At the Close of Business Sept. 12, 1916.
RESOURCES!
Loans and Discounts ....$142,840.61
Overdrafts .NONE
Ronds, Securities, etc..2,057.42
Ranking House, Furniture,
and Fixtures.9,900.00
Stock in Federal Reserve
Ranks . 1,500.00
Cash and Exchange .47,014.18
I.IARILITIES:
Capital .$25,000.00
Surplus .25,000.00
Undivided Profits .3,993.38
Deposits .110.089.14
Rediscounts .24,229.69
Rills Payable .15,009.«s
Total
$203,3:2 21
Total
$203,31221
At Close of Business, Sept. 21, 1916,
RESOURCES:
LIABILITIES:
Loans and Discounts . .$130,300.47
Overdrafts .NONE
Bonds, Securities, etc..2,104.02
Banking House, Funiture,
and Fixtures .9,900.00
Stock in Federal Reserve
Banks .1,500.00
Cash and Exchange .80,618.73
$224,423.22
Capital ..$25,000.00
Surplus . 25,000.00
Undivided Profits .4,245.14
Deposits .139,410.87
Rediscounts .15,767.21
Bills Payable .15,000.00
Total
Total
$224,423.22
MONEY TO LEND ASHDOWN PROPERTY OWNERS
CCORDING to an order issued by the City Board
of Health, property owners in Ashdown new
have less than Sixty days in which to make their connec
tions with the city. If you Peed moffby to do this, ar.d
wish to place a loan on your property, see me. I wil
now make short time loans on chattels.
“YOU GET ALL YOU BORROW.”
CLYDE H. PHILLIPS
Office in Sanderson Building.
Reference: Arkansas State Bank; First National Bank.
VILLA BANDITS MAKE ESFAPZ
Outlaws Elude Carranza Force and
Take Refuge in Hills.
Chihuahua City, Mex., Sept. 20.—The
Villa forces which recently attacked
Chihuahua City have eluded govern
ment cavalry pursuing them and have
taken refuge in the Sierre da la Siila
and the Cienga de Los Ladrone moun
tains, south of Santa Ke Ysabel, Chi
huahua according to Genarel Matia&
Ramos General Ramos reported that
after letreating northwest the bandits
turned south. A searce failed to reveal
their whereabouts. General Trevino
said that every effert will be made
to overtake the bandits.
Authorities believe that many resi
dents of the city were i.mjli:ated in
a well organized plot to assist in turn
ing the cky over to Villa and that the
plan failed because of the lack oi
■ courage of Villa’s supporters at the
last minute. Several arrests have
been made.
Manuel Chac, a former Villa general
who until recently had been in tiie
United States, was arrested following
the attack and upon the discovery of
compromising papers in his pockets
was executed. Murcelo Carravo, form
erly a general under Orozco, was cap
tured and said that Jose Inez Sai
zar is is with the Villa band.
LOWEST DEATH RATE EVER
Percentage In U, S. Last Year Small"
eit In His!cry.
Washing on, Sept. 19.—The lowest
death rate in the country’s history it
shown in the preliminary statistics for
1915. The rate, 13.5 per 1.000 is base •
on reports from 25 states and 41 ei -
ie% with a total population of 67,000,
000. In 1914 the percentage cf deaths
was 13 G, the lo west recorded up to
that time. The average rate during
♦tie period 1901-1905 was 16.2.
PAPER FROM PANE STALKS
Factory to Develop .Vow Industry to
Re Kuilt in Louisiana.
New Iberia, La., Sept 19.—Arrang -
ments have beep completed for the
construction her of a factory to man
ufacture paper from eugar cane stalks
from which the juice has been ground.
Until recently the stalks, known as
bagpasse, were considered worthless
and were burned.
--—o—
Trade in Ashdown this fall.
V, A < Ell PLANT FOll N ASHVILLE
j
Lett! ion Has Been Filed and Colli mis
sioners Appointed,
Nashville, Sept. 20.—A petition has
been hied with the City Council for i
j the formation cf improvement dls- 1
trcts for the construction of a hiunl
' ci|>al water and sewer plant Tii
matter will be decided at the nexo
1 meeting of the council, October 2. a.
1 C. Ramsey, A. B. Clark and John Hill
: \yero appointed commissioners of the i
proposed districts. The council lev
ied a five-mill /tax against all real and
personal property for the ensuing
year. This tax is to be used for gen- !
era! purposes.
PLANTATION OWNER MURDERED
Well-Known Pine Bluff Man Shot t<>
Death by Negro Tenant.
Pine Bluff, Sept. 19.—Robert L. 'Ru- j
t her ford, 48-years old, well-known
lumberman planter and oil and gas i
prospector, was shot and instantly
killed on his plantation, six mile,
southeast of Pine Bluff, at 11 o’clock
this morning by Aaron Johnson, a ne
gro tenant, who is said to have be
come enraged because Mr. Rutherford
i pb? aided him for spending his money
for whiskey instead of paying his
debts. j
The negro used a double-barreled !
shorggun and Rutherford’s lace and
head w ere riddled with buckshot.
Several revolver wounds in his body
enured the officers to believe that an
c'l er negro aided Johnson in the k: 11 -
ins'. Charles Corprue, a young negro
who lived on the Rutherford place j
also v.as messing when the officers ar- |
rived.
PROMOTE NEW RAILROAD
Memphis, Halirs nisd Gulf Plans Line
From Bingen to Corinth.
Nashville, Sept. 20.—Bert Johnson,
owner of the Highland Peach Orchard
and the ottlcials of the Memphis, Dal
las and Gulf railioad, are considering
n proposition on foot to build a rail
road from Bingen to Corinth. Mr.
Johnson savs that if this road1 were
built, fruit from his orchard would he i
shipped over it. that the country be- j
tween Bingen and Corinth would be j
a solid fruit country, and that it :
would he a great boost for diversified ’
farming. Bingen is six miles north
of Nashville oil the Memphis, Dallas
and Gulf; Corinth Is at east corner;
of the Johnson^ orchard. *
VA
WILL WORK FOR
BETTER LAWS
Nine Clubs Organize for Purpose of
Securing Better Laws in State;
Want Charity Hospital Also.
Little RoCk, Sept. 22.—(Special).—
Representatives of nine state organi
zations have formed a State Co-oper
ative Council fer Social Legislation.
Dr. Morgan Smith of Little Rock,
former State Health Officer, is chair
man; Mrs. Minnie U. Rutherford
Fuller is vice chairman, and1 M. A.
Auerbach of Little Rock is secretary.
The organizations represented are the
State Federation of Laboi'. the Ark
ansas Conference for Social Welfare,
the State Bar Association, the Stale
Federation of Women's Clubs, the
State Farmers’ Union, the State Tea
chers Association, the Arkansas W. C.
T. U» the State Homeopathic Assoc
iation. .and the State Medical Assoc
iation.
It is the purpose of those interested
in the movement to make this council
a clearing house for all proposed leg
islation of a social nature that may
come before the General Assembly
for consideration. They will secure
from other states the best and most
detailed information regarding bills
pending there. Much can be accom
plished of a beneficent nature but put
ting behind the bills thati may be in
troduced in the Arkansas Legislature
the forceful influence of leaders in
social welfare in other states.
There is an aggregate membership
of 200,000 in the component organiza
tions, and their support of any mea
sure should liave a tremendous in
fluence upon the law-makers.
One of the preliminary questions
taken up by the Council ic a bill for
the establishment of a general charity
hospital for the state, wherein the
sick, injured and crippled who can
not afford treatment elsewhere may
be given free treatment It provides
tor the sale of forty acres belonging
to the state, v,est of the Deaf Mute
institute and the use of $25 000 len
by the late Dr. Isaac Folsom for the
erection and maintenance of such an
institution. It is also to be provided
that the state's charitable institutions
shall be divorced from,- politics, and
shall be controlled by a Board of
Managers to >-e appointed by the Gov
ernor and to serve without salary.
The secretary alone would receive
compensation for his services. This
would eliminate the present system of
management by the State Board of
Control provided by the Legislature cf
l!tl5. and its proponents claim would
save money and result in better ser
vice.
CAPTURE FOREMAN NEGRO
Hope Officers Captured No ne Wanted
Cor Stealing at Foreman,
Hope. Sept. 21.—Officer Sing Maul
difi received information yesterday
frem tlie sheriff cf Little iHiver coun
ty of a robbery in Foreman and was
instructed to look cut for a diminutive
negro boy \y,ho was supposed to have
stolen $50 from a resident cf Fore
man and had left for Hope. Shortly
alter receiving the information Office’
''In.uldin located the suspect anc! made
the arrest.
The negro boy gave his name as
Sonny Bradley and claimed Foreman
as his home. He stated that his age
was about 13 or 14 years. Upon be
ing searched the prisoner was found
to have $2.45 of the stolen money on
his person. The balance, he confess
ed, had been left in the hands of a
cousin at home who was to supply'
him with funds from his deposit on
demand.
Tiie prisoner willingly confessed in
h;s reed. He seemed relieved when
iaken into custody and was glad to
return home. He was taken to Me
>bib yesterday evening by the lccal
officer-and turned over to Little River
officers, who took the prisoner to
Foreman.
LOCAL COfTON MARKET
Receipts Are Increasing Daily; Mar
ket Shows Strength,
The oc-tton market for tiie week has
shown many fluctuations, but losses
have been rapidly regained. The
prices and fair weather is bringing ii
to the market rapidly. The gin at
this place announces that they will
put on a double shift and run day ana
n'ght. The capacity of the gin is 80
bales in ten hours.
Short, 15.50 to 15.75 and 15.90.
Staple, 18 50 and up.
Seed, $40 per ton.
LUTHER BECK HIES
Foreman Young Man Died at Texar
kana This Week.
The body of Luther Beck, the 2,".
year-old son of J. A. Beck, a promi
nent former of Foreman, was convey
ed through this city Thursday morn
ing from Texarkana to Foreman. The
body was accompanied by the father
of the deceased. The death occurred
in a Texarkana hospital at 2 o’clock
Thursday morning, after he had* un
dergone an operation the first of the
week for appendicitis,
GUARDSMEN
HOME BY NOV.
Arkansans Will He at Drilling Not
Longer Than Six Weeks at. Most.
To Have Target Practice.
Deming. N. M.. Sept. 20.—It is al
most certain the Arkansas troops in
camp here will be sent back to their
hemes before November 1, at yie lat
est It is said the two Arkansas reg
iments and the First Deleware will be
1 relieved here by guardsmen from Col
orado. West Virginia and Wyoming.
No official notification of proposed
changes has been received here, al
though Capt ('has. Robinson of the
First Virginia arrived today and was
assigned to headquarters as ass:stant
chief of staff. Major A. H. Williams
I oi the Colorado National Guard has
been detailed on staff duty here for
several weeks.
Col. Edward F. Glenn of the Eigh
teenth Infantry, new at Doublas, Adz.,
has been appointed commander at
Camp Deming, succeeding Brig. Gen
eral Granger Adams, who will retire
because of his having reached the age
limit.
ry Much interest was manifested here
n the moving of the two Kansas regt
mencs from one station to another in
motor trucks. Colonel Stroupe plans
to take the Second Regiment on n
similar hike, probably to Columbus,
in order that they may become famil
iar with that mode of transportation.
Tn case cf sudden need for mere men
along the border that is the way this
camp would be moved.
Tile men are much interested in the
report that target practice will begin
next week. A range iy being fixed up
pear Black mountain . This is one
phase cf army life that the men tho:
oughly enjoy and have had nothing
of thus far.
These who think cf the army as a
hell-born institution run by the devil
and filled with his imps would liavu
received several shocks had they been
in. Deming Sunday. A union church
service was held in the recently com
pleted dance hall and picture house
with a seating capacity of 3,000. The
reason for holding the meeting there
vti to give the town people a chanco
to/attend. S nce the Arkansas hoya
arrived at Darning the churches have
been so completely filled by the sold
iers—who go early—that the local
members have been unable to get in.
Sols’lers in the Choir.
The immense building was filled
; and the soldier beys outnumbered the
civilians lour to cne. The singing
was led by a large choir, with many
soldiers in it. directed from the ros
trum by Lieutenant Stevens of the
Second Arkansas. The opening pray
er was bv Chaplain Blakeley Second
Arkansas. A Deleware soldier bo;
stood by the piano and sang “Nearer
My Home.’’
Cap.ain Weidemeyer, Second (Regi
ment. appeared by the piano and sang
"The Hand Upon the Wall." Then
another well built figure appeared on
the platform, clad In red leggings,
khaki trousers, O. D. shirt, with a
plain black tie. Many people might
be surprise^ to see a minister of the
gospel in his pulpit in his shirt sleev
es—especially an army shirt—but
those who listened to the sermon' de
livered by Chaplain Gee of the First
Arkansas forgot all that and had
thought oniv for (ho stirring word.;
Wherein Arkansas Larks.
Arkansas may well be proud of her
two regiments—what there is cf them.
But it may well be ashamed of the
size of her regiments. The boys from
Massachusetts, Deleware and the oth
er Easter and Northern states come
visiting to see the natives of the Ra.;
orback state. They remark to each
other. "What's the matter? Hasn't
Arkansas men physically fit and loy
al enough to fill her depleted compan
ies?"
Arkansas is standing before the na
t .on today as a s ate without enough
men 'loyal to their state and nation to
fill the ranks of her two regiments.
Tennessee has just sent 2.48ff men to
the border—Arkansas has 1.321. Those
i boys who answered their president's
i call and have come to the border—and
incidentally are having the best time
cf their lives—have decided opinions
of those who have never even tried to
enlist.
SMALL FI HE
Empty Cars Burned: Two Hair's
Cotton Slightly Km noil.
An empty box car on the Frisco
took lire Wednesday night and was
completely destroyed. Two small
blazes on the gin yard have occurred,
one Wednesday and one Thursday
night. 'Two bales of cotton were sligh
tly damaged before the fire in them
was extinguished
ALLENS SCHOOL OPENED
Opened September 18th, With Prot.
Zucliry in Charge.
Allene. Sept. 22.— (Special).—School
at Allene opened Monday, September
18th. There w.ere several visitors
present at the opening, and interest
ing and profitable talks were made
by Rev. Ewing of Richmond, Rev.
Fade of Wintlirop, Mr. Johnson, Mr.
Bird, Prof. Zachry and Mrs. Lennard
| Besides the addition of another grade
I to the school work this year plan-*
I are being made to have .voice and ex
I pression taught in the school,
Dt POSITS
A
>STATE
BANKd
A
,HOME£
^.BANKJ
LOAN-S
MONEY TO LOAN
BY SECURING your Farm loan at this Bank
you will receive accommodations impossible
with out of town lenders.
Should you need an extension of time because
of local conditions you will find us ready and will
ing to give you every possible attention as we are
vitally interested in our community welfare and
ready at all times to assist you to succeed.
Our rates and terms connot be bettered.
ARKANSAS STATE BANK
Ashdown, - : - Arkansas
r
“The World is in the Grip of Evil.” So says the Mayor of Boston.
President Wilson Says: “The strongholds of evil and of wrong in
the world are not as strong as they look.”
WHAT DO YOU. THINK?
Is Humanity in the Grip of Evil?
John Burton is spending his ten million dollar for
tune to solve this problem. See his adventures in
The Grip of Evil
Pathe'« Master Production
The evils of society are exposed in “The Upper Ten,”
latest chapter of “The Grip of Evil.”
To be shown at
l *
THE ROYAL THEATRE, Beginning' October Cth
HI .UXM VKTERS FOR GERMANS
Ilindcnburg Expects War to be Decid
ed in East, not in tbe D ost.
London, Sept. 20.—The wireless
press today gave out a Berne dispatch
ducting the Suddeutsche Zeitung that
the German great general staff has
been moved from the western to the
eastern front.
The great German headquarters,
which directs operations on all fronts
and at which the emperor and chief of
staff spend much of their time, was in
Belgium early in the war and) subse
quently was moved to northern
France In the spring of 1915 it was
near Lille.
Since the appointment of Field
Marshal von Hindenburg as chief of
staff, it has been reported that he de
sired to leave in France and Belgium
only sufficient men to hold the lino
and devote his energies to the east,
for it is said he believes that it is on
this front that the first conclusive vic
tories must be won.
Bast week he returned from France
to tlie eastern front. It was reported
I that Emperor William. Chancellor von
j Eethmann-Hollweg and representatlv
es of Austra Hungary, Bulgaria and
I Turkey were at the eastern head
I quarters for a conference which was
• to decide the shaping of the cam
! paign in the east.
■ -o
l Trade with your home merchant.
COLT SHOW AT COLUMBUS
Near 100 Colts In exhibition at Col
umbus on Johnson Farm.
Hope, Sept. 20.—The annual colt
show was held at Columbus yesterday
with a large attendance. Nearly 100
colts were on exhibition, besides many
good cows and poultry. The show was
Held on the large stock farm of John
son Bros. All the stock shown there
will be entered at the Hempstead
county fair, October 24.
SPA WANTS CONVENTION
Hopes to Land 191$ Meeting of Fed'
eration of Women’s Clubs.
Hot Springs. Sept. 20.—Hot Springs
is much interested in the thre days'
meeting of the Executive Committee
of the General Federation of Women's
Clubs, which convenes in Chicago to
morrow, and at which the place ot
meeting for the 1918 convention wilt
j be fixed.
Ed .Enos Failing.
Ed Jones, Ex-Country Clerk, is re
ported to be in a failing condition at
j his home in this city. His condition
I has been critical for some time, and
* the Ne^s is informed that his death
may be expected at any time, , _

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