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The Little River news. (Ashdown, Little River County, Ark.) 1897-current, June 01, 1918, Image 1

Image and text provided by Arkansas State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90050316/1918-06-01/ed-1/seq-1/

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1'ashdown •®ucer* V”**
X The Chea^and Best t
t PUce in ToV" to Buy t
+ Tour Groceries. ♦
IA'SHDOWS GBOCEKT CtVt
Little
ORAVES & GRAVES. Editors.
ASHDOWN, LITTLE RIVER COUNTY,
River
SEMI-WEEKLY
t ASHDOWN GROCERY CV. J
X You Save » Per Cent %
X ii you buy for CASH l
X from us. ..Phone 124. *
I ASHDOWN GROCEM^COJ
ARKANSAS. SATURDAY. JUNE 1. IMS.
VOLUME XX.
NUMBER 49.
GERMANS TAKE SfllSSONS
BUT NOT RAILROAD
Allies Hold Tenaciously to Protect
Line Leading to Paris—Enemy
Gains 12 Miles—Rlieims
Comes Next..
New York, May 29.—In their vio
lent attacks on the 30-mile baittle
front running from Soissons eastward
to the region northwest of Rhehns the
German armies are continuing to force
back the French and British on near
ly every sector.
The fortified town of Soissons, the
extreme left flank of the allied battle
line has been occupied by the enemy
although the French are still holding
tenaciously to its western environs
through which emerge the railway
lines leading to Paris and Compiegne.
4 According to the German official
^ eominuniciation, 25,000' prisoners
among them a French and British gen
eral, have been taken and many addi
tional towns and vantage points all
along the front have been captured.
Seemingly jP.heims, like Soissons,
also is docoved to fall into the hands
of the enemy, a- the French War Of
fice reports th:t the troops covering
the famous cathedral town, which al
most daily for severajl years has been
the target for shells of hate from the
Germans guns, have been withdrawn
^ behind the Aisnc canal, northwest of
the town.
Enemy Gains 12 Miles.
%t>' On the sector directiy soutbeent of
Soissons the Germans now re fight
ing relatively 12 miles from where
they started’ their drive Monday from
Vauxaillon, while further east, neair
Loupeign, and in the center in the
vicinity of Savigny wedges have been
driven in to a depth of approximately
15 miles.
The Germ:ns continually are throw
ing fresh divisions into the battle, but
•$; the British and French troops are
. ’ keeping up their tactics of giving
i ground only whey it is impossible
longer to hold positions under the
* tremendous pressure of the enemy,
t Heavy casualties are being suffered by
! the army of the German crown prince,
•| i^iile the losses of men to the allied
.JL forces are described as relatively
I light.
Although unofficial reports have
a mentioned the lushing up of roinforce
'I meats from the South, there has as
* % yet been no official statement that
Gener. 1 Foch is sending in liis re
JL servos.
High I'r.iiso .or America is,
Of almost a3 great interest as the
■jjjAisne battle is the situation around
■the little town of Cantigny. where
|the Americans made notable gains in
|iheir first “solo ’ attack against the
H' irm ns Tuesday. Numerous counter
,■ tacks have teen launched against
;; e Americans holding Cantigny and
| e outlying positions, but all of them
*iiav(; met with the same result—fai’.
Mure rid the loss of many men killed
and wounded. Evidently the Aniori
_ _
cans are prepared to dispute to the last
degree their occupEjncy of the high.
ground they have won. j
Unstinted praise has been showered •
upon the Americans by military offi- |
cers for the dash and daring they
showed when they left their trenches
and started out in quest of their ob
jectives.
Still another defeat has been in
iiicicd on the enemy by the Ameri- |
tans—this time far to the east in the j
Toul sector. Here the Germans let (
loose lE/i'ge quantities of gas near Fre- j
menil and delivered an attack which i
the Americans shot to pieces with ma
chine guns. Later on another sector,
under a heavy barrage fire, 14 Ger
mans managed to invade an xlmerican
trench. None of them returned. In
hamd-to-hand fighting nine of the Ger
mans were killed outright and one
died later irom 'his wounds. The other
four were made prisoners.
In Flanders and Picardy the Ger
mans are heavily bombarding French
and British positions on various sec
tors and raiding operations are being
carried out by both sides. No tig bat
tle has been begun.
--W.S.S.——
Curd of Thanhs,
j To My Friends:
Words fail me to express unto you
m:y deepest appreciation for the honor
which you conterred upon me Tues
day in nominating me to serve you as
Clerk. I :o appreciate the honor and
trust reposed in me, and I shall bend
every energy, to evidence my apprecia
tion by rendering you the most effici
ent service within my ability.
I shall always esteem it a privilege
and pleasure to serve you.
Very respectfully yours
JAS. H. WILLIAMS.
-w.s.s.
TEXAS WHEAT HARVEST HE
HIXMNCt ! > EARNEST
Dallas, Tex., May 28.—Harvesting
in some wheat fields in this section
began this week an 1 by the first of
next week the bulk of the grain cut
ting will be well started, according
to ranchmen.
J. W. Colt one of the big wheat
raisers near hero, estimated that
wheat in til t section would average
i from IS to 2" bi .dsels per jpre. In
‘tVe western :.iid northwestern por
itions of E-jllr... county some injury was
I done by the recent drouth. There is
some spring wheat about here for the
first time anti Colt says ic Lids fair to
rjual the winter variety.
it' the we the? is dry and the wheat
fully mature 1, threshing may begin
within two or three d ys alter cutting
;pw the grain may then be milled
immediately to B. R. Neal, Dallas
miller. Dallas civic and commercial
institutions are working on a plan to
furnish men for harvest labor. A cen
tral committee lias been appointed to
have charge of la/bor mobiliation and
enlist recruits. School boys, both
white and negro also are being en
listed for work in the fields.
lummScSLi: !
lARMYll
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5n: I
Lfcia oaaci;
KjJONKY SAVED BUT LYING IDLE IS FAILING
to do its duty for the U. S. Our Certificates of
Deposit offer safe and profitable depository for
such money and puts it to work where it will do
the most good for our community and our country.
Ask us more about these time deposits that earn
3 per cent interest for 3, 4 or 6 months and 4 per
cent for a year.
Ashdown, Arkansas
LITTLE RIVER COUNTY WIN
NERS WERE KNOWN EARLY
All Winners Had Safe Majority and
Most Majorities Were
Very Large—Large
Vote.
While the vote'in the Little River
primary turned out to be large none
of the contested offices were so close
that the winner could not be told
on early returns. All but Jackson and
White Cliffs precincts were in Tues
day night and the latter two were
in early Wednesday morning. For
this county the Little River News re
ceived and tabulated the returns, the
force remaining up all night in order
to give the people of the county the
news. All the early mails Wednes
day morning were able to deliver the
News to its subscribers. So well has
the News established itself as the
news center of the county that all
the candidates from aiil sections o: the
county came here to get the returns
as they came in over the wires. Some
election officials over the state are
reported to be violating the new elec
tion Taw by not giving out figures as
soon as they are counted, but Little
! River officials were prompt. The
total vote in the county was 1335.
A good set of officers have been
elected, and £j!l confidence is felt
in their ability and integrity.
Judge J. S. Steel received the larg
! est vote of any one candidate, having
opposition, receiving 1106 votes to 1T7
by W. C. Rogers.
For state senate W. H. Latimer re
ceived 512 votes, J. H. Shaw 451 and
j B. F. Arnold 213. Latimer bos carried
| Howard and Sevier the other two
counties.
Prof. 1. r. C. Anderson won for
! representative by a large majority His
| vote was 749, McDonald 254, Lambert
285.
J. H. Williams received the nomi
nation lor circuit clerk by an over
whelming majority over E. M. Dillard.
He received 928, Dillard 358.
P. M. McCord won hr.csomely for
county judge receiving 791 votes, San
derson 314, Gcthright 224.
J. U. Pierce won for sheriff by a
majority-of 117 according to figures
received by the News. The vote was
Pierce 641, Bishop 524, Davis 17u.
if. W. Gray wrjs nominated for as
sessor by a good majority. The vote
wap Gray 623, Tompkins 412, Wright
270.
J. W. Duren was unopposed for
treasurer.
U. S. Thomas w s unopposed for
su rveyor.
■The central committee will meet to
day, cast up the returns and issue the
official vote. The official vote is not
expected to be materially different
from that reported.
-W.S.S.
THURSDAY
©NT. MEAL
WEATLESS
VSZ HO OTXEAXX CRAj K I.HA
TASTKV Cm ERIAIOAST FOODS
CONTAIN I NO 'WHEAT
CLASS OF EIGHT RE
CEBfE_THEIR DIPLOMAS
The Ashdown High School Closed
Tuesday Night With the Grad
ating Program—A Good
Program.
The graduating progra(-.n Tuesday
l ight when eight pupils of the Ash
down High School received tlieii di
plomas concluded the term fo ■ the
year, being the last of the comnieece
uicii! programs. The eight who grad
uated vore, Glenn Black, Robert Brice,
Jr, blisses Mary Freeman, Sallie
Lott. Mary Fawcett, Eva Johnson.
Elizabeth Sanderson, Gertrude
Curran. The grades this year
were very close, Misg Elizabeth
Pridei son and Eva Johnson utmost
tying lor class hono s, 'here being
less than 1 j oint differ.' icc in favor
of Miss F’/zabeth
Miss Cora Smith played the march
;s the c1e;ss entered alternately by lit
tle flower girls, amrehing down the
aisles of the auditorium. The girl
graduates were dressed in white linen
middy suits with red ties. The in
vocation was made by Rev. Earley.
The program follows:
Salutatory—Evia Johnson, subject,
Opportunity.
Class History—Mary Fawcett.
Class Prophecy—Glenn Black.
Valedictory Essay—New America,
EL'nabeth Sanderson.
An t.nc papers were splendid.
Rev. Simmons of Stamps delivered
the graduating address on the subject,
Removing the Veneer in Life. He was
?. good speaker and gave some splen
did thoughst.
Superintendent D. P.Holmes deliv
ered a talk and presented the diplo
; mas. At the conclusion a number of
‘flower girls with arms ladden with
. flowers presented many beautiful flor
’1 offerings at the feet of each member
of the graduating class. The flower
girls were Bernice Perkins, Virginia
Sims, .Martha Collins, Mary Russell,
Martha Hunter, Meryl Lott, Lee Phil
lips, Martha Catherine Oliver..
-W.S.S.
-W.S.S.
WANTED ADDRESS REPEATED
After hearing Brooks Fletcher lee
lure on “Community Deadhead's’’ the
business men of Long Beach, Calif.,
rented the municipal auditorium,
closed their stores at noon Saturday,
Uheir busiest’day, end invited their
j clerks and Club Women of tire citv to
I Lear “Community Deodhoricls” again
When they lied lic.'rd this same mes
sage the second time they booked ‘The
Martyrdom of Fools" for their lyceum
course, and after they had heard this
r. sage they immediately booked
Tragedies of the unprepared," mak
ing the fourth appearance of Mr.
Fletcher within two years. Brooks
Fletcher speaks here at Chautauqua.
TEUTONS SEEK TO REACH
THE_RIVER MARNE
From There will Turn Westward With
ItuIk of Armies—General Foch
Apparently Believes This Is
Main Orman Attack.*
Witli the French Army in France,
May 30.—!The Germans in the Cham
pagne pushed farther toward the riv
er Marne today. The intention of the
Teutons probably is to secure a po
sition enabling them to turn to the
westward with the bulk of their at
tacking armies.
The efforts of the Germans since
their first rapid advance appear to
take a fan-like movement. The prin
cipal of the Teuton divisions seems to
be tli rusting in the direction of Fere
en-Tardenois, which now is under a
heavy fire.
On both flanks also strong forces
are engaged. The first of these cap
tured Soissons. while on the eastern
flank they threaten R.heims. In the
latter region, however, they are meet
ing the sternest defense from the
Franco-British forces, whiclineverthe
less ha,ve been obliged to realign in
order to keep the front straight.
Allied reserves now are taking up
position in the battle line. They are
being thrown in to strengthen the de
fending forces where they are weak
est in preparation for the placing of
a barrier to a further German ad
vance.
Fresh enemy divisions have been
I
Returns J><> Change Senator and
Governor Results—Only
One Race ( lose.
Little Rock May 30.—Senator Robin
son has been renominated, his lead
over Brundidge increasing steadily as
belated returns came in. The Gazette
at midnight had received returns from
all but 10 counties in the state. The
vote was complete from eight counties
only, but nearly complete from sever
al others. Out of 94,110 vote3, Robin
son had 57.009 and Brundidge 37,101.
Robinson's majority is 19,908, almost
double what it was yesterday. 'Robin
son took the lead in the first returns
that came in early Tuesday night and
has steadily increased it since then.
Governor Brough is maintaining his
ratio of about two to one over Smith.
At midnight last night his vote was 64,
384 against 33,188 for Smith.
Jim Ferguson has defeated John H.
Page for commissioner of mines,
manufacture and agriculture.
In the race for state treasurer Joe
Ferguson is leading Tipton by 2,000
votes.
-W.S.S.
: brought forward hastily to take the
j places of those exhausted by the ad
j vance of the last three days and con
jtinue the pressure on the allies.
The territory south of the Vesle
' river, which the Germans have cross
ed at several points, is more difficult
for the attack.
I!
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The Modern Spirit
of cooperation, the spirit which animates all suc
cesssful business, prevails in the organization of
our Federal reserve bank.
We own stock in it. We keep our reserve
cash in it. We have a voice in electing'its direc
tors and through them in choosing its manage
ment. It is our bank, and its resources enable
us at all times to meet legitimate banking re
quirements of our community.
You, in turn, can cooperate with us in main
taining the Federal Reserve Banking System, and
at the same time share in its benefits and pro
tection. by becoming one of our depositors.
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
f, ASIIDOWN, ARK. W. K. HALLER, Cashier
f.
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The Story of the Election in Figures
-y. »
in -
C 5;
o
Pauley Precinct
Litt'e ltiver ....
Arden .
Johnson .
Franklin .
Red River .
t'aney No. 1.
Lick Creek .
Cleveland .
Burke ..
Jeff Davis .
Richland .
Jefferson .
Arkinda .
White Cliffs .
CO ■
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Jackson .
TOTALS.
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4 13 12
58 31* 61 42
21 23 11 38
27 23 30 21
34 16 18 20
17 36 19 34
18 17 16 11
45 42 63 30
42 25 25 43
16 25 27 22
8 15 16 8
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16 20 4 37
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41 36 15 13 8 28 38 16
8 26 1 2 11 14 9 11
7 32 4 6 30 16 17
50 61 26 1 9 87 23 71
19 51 18 21 14 33 20 44
6 43 7 13 3 34 28 22
10 23 3 4 10 12 15 8
18 253 20" “28 14 121 212 133 209 8 202 106 40
24 15 36 5 5 5 31 16 15 10 10 23 8
28 11 2823319 13
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4 7 57
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2 17 10 11
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22 133 59 62 48 32 206 248 41 111 74 114 175 37 87 37 204 39
513 451 815 254 885 745 638 358 224 314 791 641 524 170 418 683 276

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