OCR Interpretation


Apache drum beat. (San Carlos Apache Reservation, Ariz.) 1959-19??, April 01, 1960, Image 3

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90051695/1960-04-01/ed-1/seq-3/

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SOMETHING TO REMEMBER OF THE BY-GONEs
The Apache Tribe
This tribe is the real tribe of
the Apaches. There are some, of course
branches of Apaches in states,
such as the viescalero or Jicarilla
Apabhes which are found in the State
of New Mexico.
The reputation of Geronimo is re
flected often on this tribe. Those
who hear of an Apache think they are
all like Geronimo, but they are mis
taken. This tribe fought against Ger
onimo. At times unpleasant things
happen on the reservation, as they do
elsewhere, but that does not give
reason enough to reflect Geronimo*s
reputation on the tribe.
Their chief occupation is stock
raising, mostly cattle raising. A lit
tle farming is being done. Old Indians
as well as young folks still hold the
old custom of gathering food on the
mountains such as acorns, berries,
walnuts and various other things.
Like in other tribes medicine men
do their stunts, sometimes sinking
and beating the tom-tom all night long
over the sick. They also, stage all
kinds of Indian dances, the devil
dance and sunrise ceremony being the
most popular of all.
Their custom of olden time is still
carrie d on as to their clothing and
dwelling places. Although the govern
ment built some houses for them, yet
many use them for storage houses.
They are so fond of tepees that they
would much rather live in them. When
a member of the family passes away,
the tepee and all his belonging are
burnt. Old folks of course are still
superstitious in many things.
When a young couple is married you
hear no wedding bells, nor is there
any entertainment. However the parents
or relatives of the couple exchange
goods like food, blankets, money,
houses, saddles, etc.
Within the tepee you will notice
a bed on the ground and some boxes or
group of boxes formed like a cabinet
here food, cooking and eating utensils
are kept. They eat three meals a day.
A canvas is spread, and the food is
placed on it ready to be eaten and
then the world's greatest indoor sport
takes place. When they are finished
the dishes go back to their places
clean.
Their means of transportation is on
foot, horses and few in cars. Horses
are much used going after acorns on
the mountains during the summer months.
Quite a number of the younger Ind
ians are seen among the group also.
And now I want to say to the young
people who are attending school else
where, as well as young folks around
or throughout the reservation, if you
haven't turned to Christ's teaching
do so now before it's too late. If
you cannot do anything else at least
2
teach your little ones so they will
hear of Christ and His teachings.
This completes my article and wish
all Scout readers God's blessing.
Thank you.
Clarence Wesley,
Graduate of Albuquerque Indian School
(Re-copied from Lutheran Church's
Apache Scout - March 1933.)
SAN CARLOS VETERANS COMING HOME - 1945
During the last several months re
latives, friends and missionaries were
happy and thankful to the Lord to be
able to welcome home the following
servicemen, who returned to San Carlos
from distant battlefields in Europe
and the Pacific P
Back from Europe, from Germany and
Italy are:
The Privites First Class Guy Dill a
Roger R. Dickson, John L. Dawson,
Thomas K. Dude, Richard Galsun, Hockin
Hinton, Erick Hopkins, David Kinney t
Kelly May, Andy Norman, Stanton Norman,
and Seaman l/e Clyde N. Victor.
Back from the Pacific, from Luzon of
the Philippines, and from campaigns or
other islands are:
Sergeants Ralph Dude, Harding Haoz
ous, Privates First Class Alex. Hosay,
Sam Pechuli, Henrjr Thorne, Teddy Up
shaw, Seaman l/c Virgil Char
les H. Victor,
Ernest L. Victor is back from the
Pacific Coast from the C.B. Camp at
Ft. Hueneme. And Sgt. Fred Phillips
is back from Military Police Duty at
Camp Blanding, Fla., who with six
others, above named, was honorably
discharged. Others are about to get
their discharges soon,
CONGRATULATIONS, SAN CARLOS APACHES.'
The San Carlos Apaches received
from 'Washington, D. C., a photograph
of a naval officer congratulating the
tribe for its efforts in war bonds.
It reads something like this: "Con
gratulating the San Carlos Apaches
that tops all other tribes in the
country in buying war bonds."
SOMETHING TO R MBEMBER OF THE BY-GONES
WILL BE PUBLISHED MONTHLY UNTIL WE
out
RUN/OF NEWS OF THE 30's AND THE
WORLD WAR 11. LOOK FORWARD TO THE
NEXT MONTH ISSUE, AS THERE WILL BE
MORE NEWS OF THE BY-GONES, DON'T
WEEP WHEN YOU READ THE NEWS OF THE
PAST, OR YOUR EYES MIGHT GET VET...

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