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The Brunswick news. [volume] (Brunswick, Ga.) 1906-2016, November 03, 1921, Image 1

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FAIR
VOLUME XX—NO. 345
WAR DEPARTMENT
PRONOUNCES TALE
OF WATSON UNTRUE
Secretary Weeks Says Was
Only Ten Executions of
Soldiers Overseas.
ONLY AGGRAVATED CASES
ARE PUNISHABLE BY DEATH
War Secretary's Answer to All
Charges Made by Georgia
Senator of Sarcastic Nature.
—Photograph of Galows Does
Not Mean/. Twenty Odd Men
Were Executed, He Said in
Statement Issued.
(By Associated Press,)
Washington, D. C., Nov. 2. —The
war de-partraent says it is willing to
answer fully Sen. Watson’s charges
of Prussianiam in the American army
during the war. Denials of Watson’s
claims cahne swarming out afte| the
Georgia legislator had told of alleged
hanging and shootings of doughboys
by the wholesale without the usual
process of court-martial.
Secretary of Wai Weeks consulted
Gen. Harbord, assistant chief of staff;
Col. Kroger, in charge of courts-mar*
trial abroad during the war, and Ma
jor Cocheu, well posted adviser in
euch matters. Subsequently, he de
clared emphatically and with a trace
of sarcasm: j 4
“1 don’t know what Senator Watson
means, or thinks he means. Certain
ly a picture cf a gallows (Watson
showed a picture purporting to have
been the place where twenty-one exe
cutions occurred one morning) is no
proof that executions have been
made.” *
There were only ten,executions in
the overseas forces, ail of these being
for either murder, or assault, or both,
and all preceded with adequate ln
quity and trial.
Mach case Was of nirAfrgr#vrttf*d
nature, for Instance, one soldier was
executed for attacking, while drunk, j
a 12-yearctld French girl, afterward
killing tier and throwing her body on >
a refuse pile. Rut,” Secretary WeekH j
added, "I believe I am correct in de \
daring that there not a single,
case of an executloti for a military of
fense. (Under this head .come sleep
ing at post, desertion, and the like).
Tn cases where the death sentence
had been Imposed, It was later com
muted to imprisonment.”
WATBON’B WITNESSES 1
,KEBIDE IN GEORGIA.
(By Associated Press.)
Washington, Nov. 2.—Senator Was
son today expressed dissatisfaction
wtth the senate inquiry order. The
motion made by Senator I .enroot, Re
publican. Wisconsin, and adopted
unanimously by the senate, was con
lined to ordering the Inquiry and uu
thorixlng the special committee but
did not provide for power to pay or
subpoena witnesses or documents.
Senator Watson said he would bring
thesa matters before the senate short
iy.
Mr. Watson said he was receiving
scores of letters and telegrams today
from former service m** and their
parents. He said most of hi* witness
es resided In Ooorgla and he did not
know how soon he could collect his
evidence.
FUNERAL W. B. COLESBERRY
YESTERDAY AFTERNOON.
Hsid From St. Mark's Episcopal at;
4 O’clock, Conducted by Rev.
William Johnson.
Tty 4 remains of William B. Oolee
berry 4 ceaebed the city yesterday at
noon from Tampa, ami ihe funeral
an hold from St. Mark's Episcopal
church. at 4 P, m,. the services being 1
rood noted by Rev. William Johnson.;
and Interment was In Palmetto ceme
tery. ' * j
The death of Mr. Oolesberry ha*
roused treat sorrow among a wide
circle of friends In Brunswick who
had known him practically all of his
Jlfe, He was one of thoae persona who
apoke 111 of no one. waa generous to
a fault, and had to be Intimately
known to be appreciated. The church
waa well tiled by friends of the de
ceased and his family and the floral
were both tn%merou* and
etwutlfnl. Fallowing acted a pall
beoters T C, Lawrence and A. V.
Wood. Jr~ A. C Wood U A. Robinson.
t| Mjatar Hopkins
THE BRUNSWICK NEWS
ARMISTICE DAY IS
NATIONAL HOLIDAY.
|Wasl4jngtf>n, Nov. 21 —Axmßs-,
tice Day, November 11, will be
declared a national holiday, in
honor of America’s unknown sol
dier to be buried th?t day in
Arlington.
Congressional action on a reso
lution requesting the President
and all state governors to pro
claim the day a htoliday Wa**
completed today through adop
tion by the senate. Issuance of
the proclamation by Mr. Hard
ing is expected within a few
days.
MORE THAN TWENTY
FIVE THOUSAND IN
COAL FIELDS OUT
This Caused Closing of Not Less
Than Two Hundred
Mines.
CHECK-OFF REGARDED AS
BREAKING OF CONTRACT
Reports From Pennsylvania’s
Blltuminous District Indicate
That Stopping of Check-off
Would Delay Strike Order
Affecting Over Forty Thou
sand in That District.—Court
Injunction Causing Strike.
(By Associated Press.)
.Indianapolis, Nov. 2. —Delay in the
.spread of “protest” strike of the soft
cpal im/inegiH was started today
.walkouts of twenty-five thousand
union workers, dosing nrore than two
hundred Indiana mines, was nntlclpat
**d tonight by officials of the United
hi in* WqrkerK, said development*
,awaited (Macontiimance of the opera
tor* of the union check-toff of dues
from the minors’ wages as directed by
a federal court Injunction.
Reports from the Pennsylvania bi-
I luminous district said the check-off
I would be stopped with the next pay*
! day date, which Is not given, but it
is probable will delay any strike order
effecting the forty thousand Workers
In that field.
Work in the Indiana coal field was
practically at a standstill Wlay as a
result of wnlkouts of 25,000 men em
ployed at approximately 200 mines
In the state, according to early reports
xecelved at union headquarters.
Widespread walkouts in the soft
|coal fields of the country were expect
led at International headquarters of
the United Mine Workers of America.
LNo reports, however, were available
! there as to conditions in the sixteen
!slates Into which messages were sent
| by the union chiefs, advising that dis
continuance of operators of the
i "check-off.” as prescribed by Federal
| Judge A. P. Anderson’s Injunction,
was to be treated as breaking the ex
luting wage agreement.
At the Terre Haute headquarter* of
the Indiana miners It was said the
-only mines working today were a
I few of the smaller plants. No formal
order for a strike had been issued at
i the headquarters, but,- officials said
much was under consideration.
P. H. Penna, secretary of the Indi
ana Bituminous Coal Operators’ As
sociation. In a statement today took
Issue with President John L. Lewis
ond other union officials whether obe
dience of the tnjtinotton would result
;4h violation of a contract between
| miners and operator* asserting that
the contract provided that both par
ties were hound by any decision of a
; federal conn.
OPENINfi OF PORTER’S HAT
SHOP SUCCESSFUL EVENT
An evdhl J W much interest In fem
inine Brttkswkk was the opening of
t Porter’* Hat Shop. .*>o4 Gloucester
street. Misses Mary and Florence Por
ter., yesterday morning, and scores
visited the establishment during the
day.
The Misses Porter are not new to
affair* of a millinery nature, both hav
ing bad a varied experience and es
pecially Is thla true of Miss Florence
Porter, who has been practically in
.charge of Mia* Kate Slater s store for
'the uat several months* acting as
hover, etc. The Nears predicts auc
,ramt la the eery fullest to these eater
nrtotug young ladles
THE NEWS IS A MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
HOOVER CALLS MOTHER CONFERENCE
Washington. Nov. 2. —(By Associated Press.)—The first call of standing committees of the national unem
ployment conference in New York on Friday, fcas been sept out by Secretary Hoover, It was announced today
by Edwprd Hunt. aecretaiV of the conference.** *
'Hie present status of the unemployment problem of emergency measures in larger title* will be placed
before the committees which will be selected to study the situation.
CHARLES IS SENT
OUT OF HUNGARY
Former Emperor Starts on Per
manent Exile From His Na
tive Land—Assembly to Meet
and Forever Sever Connec
tions With Hapsburgs.
(By Associated Press.)
Budapest. Nov. 2.—Former Emper
or Charles was today cn his way out
of Hungary to begin what appears to
be a permanent exile. He and former
Empress Ztta left Tihnny yesterday
for Dunafoeldvar. a town on the Du
nube below this city, and there they
went on board the British gunboat
Glow Wrrm. Arrangements have been
made to land the erstwhile monarch
at Oaltz. Roumania. about 100 miles
from the mouth of the Danube.
Preparations were being made here
today for a special session of the Hun
garian national assembly , tomorrow,
at which time a resolution deposing
-of the'Hapsburg dynasty from the
throne will he presented. The assem
bly was convoked by the government
Jn response to an ultimatum from the
Allied powers directing that all ties
between the Hapshnrg ramily and
Hungary he formally severed.
PRESIDENT CELEBRATES
FIFTY-SIXTH BIRTHDAY
(By Associated Presa.)
Washington* Now. i.— -Pnrstderg
Harding,celebrated his Sflth birthday
today quietly at the White House, no
special program having tyen arrang
ed for the occasion. Scores of con
gratulatory letters and telegrams
were received during the day from
friends throughout this country and
many from abroad.
The President refused to observe
the day as a holiday, arriving at *the
executive offices at the usual hour.
The engagement list for the day waa
even longer than usual, containing the
name# of a number of members of
congress.
One of the ftrst congratulatory mes
sages 4o be received by the President
twa* from King Georg* of England
BRUNSWICK, GEORGIA. THURSDAY, NOV. 3, 1921.
HOUSE COMMONS discuss
CONFERENCE TOMORROW
(By Associated Press.)
London. Nov. 2. —Discussion of the
Washington armament conference
will take place in the House of Com
mons Friday In connection with the
resolution by labor members warmly
approving the conference.
Austin Chamberlain, the govern
ment leader, announced tonight that
the discussion was opposed by some
fearing the adverse effects it might
produce:
L M. RUSSELL DEAD
BODY SENT VIDAIIA
Passed, Away After Short Ill
ness.—Was the Oldest Mem
ber of Local Police Depart
ment and Members Acted as
Pallbearers.
After an illness of only short dura
tion. U M. Russell passed away yes
terday morning. The cause of nis
death was apoplexy and the end |j*d
been expected for the past
four hour*. The body was taken to
Vidialta last night where interment
will be held today. Arthur Bussell, a
son. has lived in the Toombs capital
for a number of years and as it Is the
intention of Mrs. Russell o make her
home there, it was the wish of the
family that the remains should rtyf
In the cemetery at that place.
Deceased has lived in Brunswick
and Glynn county for the un-t fortv
flve years. He eras with old Hil
ton and Dodge Lumber company ot
9t. Simon i long time. Cam', to Bruns
wick and was interested with tho late
J. J. Lott in the whole**** grocery
business, later selling out and becogfc
Inga member of the polite depart
ment wtyre he has since remained.
He was born In New York *tate and
eras 71 years ot age
The passing of Mr. Rusae'l removes
one of Brunswick * best knojm citi
zens* Asa man and an officer he was
never found wanting ana his deeU
Is deeply deplored by til classes of cit
fsenry
R. E. FINN MANAGER
OF OODGE AGENCY
Former Waycross Citiizen Has
Assumed Direction of Busi
ness Here, and J. H. Rentz,
Popular Brunswickian, to be
With New Management.
By a change announced recently,
the famous Dodge Brothers motor car
Is now represented In Brunswick by
J. N. Stinson, of Waycross. Mr. Stin
son having recently purchased the
agency from L. V. Williams, Incorpor
ated, also of that city.
R .B. Finn, formerly of Waycross.
and for thirteen years a practical au
tomobile man. Is the new Brunswick
manager of the bustness and associat
ed with him is J. E. Rent*, formerly
of Brown & Rent*, one jot the best
Jknown young men of the city. }
The Dodge Brothers agency is lo
cated at .Vo. 1523 Newcastle street
and Is one of the handsomest and best
located in Brunswick. The Dodge car
needs very little commendation; It
sells generally on its merits. The
touring car is now offered at $1,130
delivered in Brunswick. w|d!e the
roadster is selling at sl.o7s.' ,: TWe‘ News
very cordially welcome* Mr. Finn to
the city and is sure that he will prove
to be a live wire In'the auto game here
as he will prove to be a valuable ac
quisition to the buatnees circles.
Mr? Stinson, who has also acquired
the Waycross district agency, is a
(former prominent Waycroas attorney
and in hl own city Is highly esteemed
by a large list of friends and acquain
tance*. He is a frequent visitor to
Itrunswkick and believe* in the future
of the city/ In the two agencies, he
now represents the Dodge Brothers
iin eleven south Georgia counties.
SENATOR HARRISON SURE
DEMOCRATS WIN IN 1024
Owensboro. Ky- Nov. 2.—ln a pub
lic address here today. Senator Pat
i Harrison, of Mississippi, declared
[Democrats “will see victory in 1924.
I feel K in the air and on the princf-
Ffftas and the princtpta* for Whfcfa|
'Woodrow Wilson fought win be rindi
£'*<*' 1 > ‘ &
TWO ARE ARRESTED IN
BIG MAIL ROBBERY.
(By Associated Press.)
New Yyrk. Nov. 2. —Michael
ArbesS and Frank Calabrese
were arrested today in Jersey
City in connection with the ten
million dollar mail robbery on
October 24, it was announced to
night.
ROTHMANS FROM
SAVANNAH SPEND
AFTERNOON HERE
In the Party Was Governor
John A. Turner, ot
Tampa, Fla.
TENDERED A DINNER AND
SHOWN ABOUT BRUNSWICK
President George H. Smith, of
Local Rotary Club, Presided
Last Evening and Interesting
Addresses Were Made by
Governor Turner, Col. Fred
Altstaetter, and Rev. William
Johnson.
Coming over from Savannah as the
guests of Col. Fred Altstaetter on the
government boat yesterday, was a
party of prominent Rotarians of the
Forest City, bringling with them as
their special guest, Governor John A.
Turner, of Tampa, who is making a
tour of Georgia and Alabama in con
nection with the coming Rotary con
vention to be held in Savannah and
who is also making visits to various
•points over which his Jurisdiction ex
pends, three states being in the list,
Georgia. Flarodia, and Alabama, these
composing the Eighth district.
Arriving here the, distinguished par
ty was met by a delegation of local
Rotarians, beaded by President
George H. Smith, and were shown va
rious points of interest about the city
during the early afternoon. In the
evening a delightful dinner was ten
dered the guests and this was the oc
! casion of unusual Interest as Gover
nor Turner addressed the club rfnd
this was, indeed, a delightful oration
on Rolfcry work. He is eloquent and
logical ami he certainly charmed his
hearers. Col. Altstaetter, president of
the Savannah Rotary Club, also de
livered an address in his usual force
ful manner. He has always taken
great Interest in the local Rotary club
and it was due, in a great degree, to
him that Brunswick possesses such an
excellent organization. Rev. William
Johnson proved to be as eloquent on
'this occasion as he is in pulpit oratory
and his address last night was one of
Ihe very best it has been the pleasure
pf the Rotary club to hear.
Governor Turner and other mem
bers of the patty were delighted with
fhefr visit to Brunswick. It was the
Governor's first trip to this city and
Jte was greatly impressed with it, not
.only from the stand point of a Rotar*
ian, but others as well. After the din
ner last evening the party boarded the
handsome craft and will make their
way in leisure fashion back to Savan
nah. Local Rotarians were delight
ed at having Governor Turner and the
Other* with them and the visit seems
to have been a mutually pleasing af
fair.
REDISCOUNT RATE
REDUCTION MADE
Governor Wellborn, of Atlanta
Federal Reserve Bank, An
nounces His Desire to Assist
Business and Agricultural
Conditions of This District.
Atlanta. Nov. 2.—ln announcing a
reduction in the rediscount rate on
-all classes of paper by the Atlanta
federal Reserve Bank today from si*
’to five and a half per cent. M. B. Weli
.born. governor, stated the cut was
-made in order to'improve and assist
business and agricultural intermits in
this district.
The period of marketing crop* is
not nearly finished and Us banks de
sire to assist the farmer* in dispos
ing of their products, Gopernor Well
Sborn said *
I IMIiV- Tina*-
F%; \
PRICE FIV. 'ITS
AMERICAN LEb.JN
ELECTS MACNIDER
AS ITS COMMANDER
New Head is a Banker of Omaha
and a Hero of the World
War.
HOLDS NUMBER OF MEDALS
FOR DISTINGUISHED SERVICE
i:
Number of Resolutions Passed,
One of Which Opposes Par
don For Debs, Another Asks
That Every Effort be Made to
Return Grover C. Bergdoll to
United States, and a Greeting
to Woodrow Wilson.
Kansas City, Nov. 2. —Sanford Mae*
Nider, of Mason City, lowa, was linan*
Imously elected national commander
of the American Legion, succeeding
John p. JEmery, of Grand Raplcls,
Mich. '
The new commander was wounded
at St. Mihlel, and holds a number of
medals for distinguished service. He
i°- # an Omaha banker and ii 'unmarried.
The convention adjourned after the
election of officers and adopting reso*
lutions covering a wide range of sub
jects, two of which favored Immediate
bonus legislation.
Among other recommendations was
a demand that every effort be made to
bring about the return to the Unit
ed States of Grover C. Bergdoll. Amer
ican slacker.
Opposition to the release of Eugene
V. Debs, serving a term in the Atlanta
federal prison for violation of war
time laws, also was declared.
Deep regret over the untimely death
of the late National Legion command
er. Colonel Frederick W. Galbraith,
Jr., wa voiced in one resolution and
another contained a greeting to form
er President Wilson, expressing for
his speedy and complete recovery.
The points touched on in the other
resolutions wt-re:
Commending publication of slacker
Hats by the government.
More reverent observance of Me*
morial Day.
( Resolution that the American Le
gion, in national convention assem
bled,- indorse the idea of International
armament limitation.
The convention adapted a resolu
felon reaffirming the attitude taken by
the -last national convention at Cleve
land relative to adjusted compensa
tion. The resolution, which reviewed
the history of the tentative - bonus
legislation heretofore sponsored by
the legion, which culminated in the
Sweet bill, passed by the house of rep
resentatives and rejected by the sen
ate upon the recommendation of the
President, reaffirmed the legion’s
stand in favoring the passage of legis
lation providing the same,sort of ad
justed which the Sweet
bill provided.
HUTCHESON “RECOMMENDS”
PUT STRIKERS P\Ck ON JOB
(By Associated Press.)
Houston, Texas, Nov. 2. —Fedetal
Jndge Hutcheson recommends that
five hundred odd members of the
Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen of
the International and Great Northern,
who have been on strike since Octo
ber 22, be taken Into employ of the
road.
KERSEY S BARGAIN STORE
MAKING RAPID STRIDES.
! People Have Learned That Thl* Es
tablishment Has Proved Great
Money Saver. ' j
For rapid and substantial growth,'
Kersey's Bargain Store. 2125 Norwich
street can be classed among the lead
ers a* this business has reached a
place in Brunswick’s retail mercantfTb
affairs that la among the very lop and
all this has been accomplished wlfhin
a very short time.
It Is a general store, carrying as It
does, merchandise of a varied charac
ter and on any article the purchaser
finds that he has saved money In these
times It behooves everybody to wetch
every penny and spend their money
where It will go farthest and this 1*
exactly what It wfli do at this estab
lishment. Mr. Kersey, with abound
ing faith in Brunswick's future, has
j purchased the property where hie
store I* located and ic here to makn
, this his hope for all times, and be is
gladly welcomed a* just such men
make big cities,

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