OCR Interpretation


The Frostburg spirit. (Frostburg, Md.) 1913-1915, November 27, 1913, Image 8

Image and text provided by University of Maryland, College Park, MD

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90057193/1913-11-27/ed-1/seq-8/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

INTERESTING PEN PICTURES
OF PICTURESQUE POLITICS
(Continued from first page)
bladder; Thompson, a Democrat, his
fellow Senator, a good fellow, a man
who needs the office, but a 22-caliber
short, and the disorganization of the
only party that ever did anything for
the people. But they are coming
back, and next November X will write
you of the overwhelming victory of
the only party that ever “did things”
in Kansas or the nation.
Hypnotized by the Great Bull
Moose Gas God.
The great majority of Kansas Re
publicans who supported the “Bull
Moose” rebellion, had no thought of
nor care for its issues and pledges of
the coming political millenium. They
saw nothing, heard nothing, felt
nothing but the personality of that
demagogue and egotist, Theodore I!
With himelimated, the so-called party,
like the pricked bubble, collapses.
There never was a party known as
the Progressive party. But there was
an insurrection, a rebellion, a mutiny,
instigated by one man, dominated by
one man and consisting of but one
man.
And, “his like we ne’er shall see
again,” thank God !
Anything Will Grow and Bear Fruit
in Kansas.
Our people are ever ready to em
brace any ism or discarded idea. If
it will not thrive in other soil, pl.ant it
in Kansas, and if it does not bear fruit,
flourish and yield a goodly crop of its
kind, it will result in some new and
heretofore unknown monstrosity that
will attract attention until some
thing more successful is tried. We
are erratic to an extreme, vissionary
to the sane limit, enthusiastic, active,
pugnacious, inconsistent, posses an
inherent inclination to wander off the
reservation, but sure to be present at
“the round up,” eager and ready to
take the brand. Politics is the relig
ion of the Kansan, but it can be said
to his honor, office is not the chief
objective—there is profit, sometimes
in “being the man outside, looking in. ”
Ten years ago we had annual elec
tions, which together with the munic
ipal and special elections, ,each year,
we thought was too much of a good
thing, so we changed to biennial elec
tions. Now our campaigns are three
years long, the subsequent lapping
over into the previous. We feel some
times as if,
On hell’s hot bricks, if politics
And all of such
Were left behind, we would not mind
The change so much!
Yours for Spirit —ual success,
J. W. Farrell.
Making Goods to Fit the Price.
An educational campaign on mail
order methods of buying stock would
do more toward stimulating home buy
ing in this town than any other one
thing. The merchants of this town
buy standard brands of goods and get
the quality they order.
The mail-order concern dictates its
own purchasing price. It is a fact
that buyers for mail-order houses ap
proach the manufacturer of an article
and tell him they must have the goods
at a certain figure. It is ever a ques
tion of price and not quality. The
manufacturer gives the mail-order
concern an article which he has
cheapened until he can make a mar
gin of profit in spite of the price stip
ulation. If it happens to be an article
made of metal, then' an inferior grade
is used, or paint is used instead of
enamel, or some other method em
ployed to force the cost of manufac
turing down to meet the mail-order
buyer’s price. Of course, the out
ward appearance of the article may be
the same as the one carried by the
merchant in this town, but—
The merchant paid more, but he got
more for his money. If you buy of
of him you will, too. Then again a
mail-order house will sell an article at
a loss to attract attention. These
“leaders” are a bait. The catalogue
buyer compares this with the price he
would have to pay here, and noting
the differenqe, jumps at the conclu
sion that everything in the mail-order
house must be less expensive. Para
doxical as it may be, the mail-order
goods are cheaper,but are not less ex
pensive.
If such arguments were logically
sound there is still the social, moral
and religious view to be considered.
The retail merchant is the backbone
of the country town. The mail-order
house is his worst enemy.' The farm
ers need the town and the town needs
the farmers. If the persons in this
. town who buy of mail-order houses
could be brought to realize that buy
ing inferior goods at low prices is not
always a saving of money, a big step
would be taken toward eliminating
the mail-order evil.
The people who buy their merchan
dise outside of the home town are as
foolish as the merchants who send to
other towns for their printing.
Frostbwrg Souvenir Books.
Sixty-two pages; beautifully em
bossed flexible cover; 172 fine illus
trations of people, buildings, street
scenes and local scenery printed ar
tistically on high-lustre coated paper;
a complete historical and biographic
al sketch of Frostburg and Frost
burgers; also contains the names and
addresses of about 2,500 former re
sidents and old-home week visitors;
a valuable work to preserve for fu
ture reference; gives a better idea of
Frostburg than a billion postcards
could These books would be
cheap at 50 cents each, but can be
had at The Spirit office for only 15
cents; sent postpaid to any address
for 21 cents. tf.
Miss Ada Liveugood Place d ia
Responsible Positioa.
Miss Anna B. Cushaine, of Buffalo j
N. Y., was recently induced to come
to Johnstown, Pa., to inaugurate and
manage a campaign to raise 150,000
for the Mercy Hospital, of that city.
Miss Cushaine is an expert in that
line, and the campaign is proving a
great success.
Hast week Miss Ada Ifivengood,
daughter of Editor and Mrs. P. E.
Eivengood, of this city, was chosen
from among four stenographers em
ployed in the campaign to take charge
of the campaign headquarters and re
main in charge until today, when
Miss Cushaine,is expected to return
and help to close the campaign, which,
according to Johnstown newspapers,
will close with the full amount of $50,-
000 raised.
Miss Livengood may accompany
Miss Cushaine to other cities to assist
her in other money-raising campaigns
for worthy institutions, as she likes
her work, and is greatly praised by
her employer.
Subscribe for The Spirit.
TRUSTEE’S SALE
Of Valuable Fee Simple Real Estate
Situated iu the Town of Frost
burg, State of Marylaud.
Under and by virtue of a decree of the Circuit
Court for Allegany County, the undersigned, as
trustee, will sell at public auction, in front of the
Post Office, in the Town of Frostburg, Allegany
County, State of Maryland, on the
6tli Day of December, 1913,
AT 10 O’CLOCK A. M.,
All of that valuable lot of ground situated on Mc-
Culloh street, 50 by 100 feet, and improved by a
good two-story frame building and other neces
sary out building.
It being the same property conveyed by Thomas
Price to Eliza A. Boyce by deed dated the 2nd day
of November, 1886, and recorded in Liber No. 67
Folio 193, one of the Land Records of Allegany
County.
TERMS OF SALE—One-third cash on day of
sale, one-third in four months and one-third in
eight months. Cost of transfer to be paid by the
purchaser.
CHARLES G. WATSON, Trustee.
11-13 11-27
I;::;:;:;::::::::;::;:::;;;::::;;;:;:;;:;:;:;:;;
1 WHEN YOU HAVE ANY “tyx
| PLUMBING, HEATING g
g OR. g
'£ GAS FITTING %
vj TO BE DONE, GIVE US A CALL. X
K ff
X We Guarantee x
| AH Our Work
H WE HAVE A FEW GAS RANGES |j
|| we will sell at cosh. 5
J. Nairn (2b Bro.
}<xxk}S<}!}okx}oski!l{xjo}o{
Try This Flour
“Golden Sheaf Patent.”
You can’t get better bread from any
brand- on the market, no matter
what price you pay.
ONCE TRIED ALWAYS USED;
per sack.
Por sale by ■n
EDWARD DAVIS 6c CO.,
Leading Grocers,
Next Door to Postoffice.
| 11. $. COMMENT |
s S
Is spending millions annually to conserve V
the lumber resources of the country. X
w Every property owner can help this work by Cj
saving the lumber in his own buildings. xx
X Good paint, renewed at proper intervals, X
X preserves lumber indefinitely. xx
** Use good paint on all exposed wood work X
xrf and renew it at frequent intervals; you will, xy
X not only help to conserve the country’s national
resources, but you will save money yourself. X
Frostburg Is An Up-to-date Town j;
in most things, but very much backward in the
x* use of paint. If your house is one of the houses x
X that need paint, call and see us. NOW , is the X
time to paint.
| G. E. PEARCE DRUG CO. g
Be a Booster, not a knocker. Sub
scribe for your home paper. tf.
Notice of Application for Saloon License
WHEREAS, The following named persons
have, in compliance with Chapter 140 of the
Acts of the General Assembly of Maryland
for the year 1894, as amended by Chapter 415
of the Acts of 1902, being Article 1, and as
amended by the Acts of 1904 and Acts of
1908, and of the Acts of 1910, Publie Local
Laws of Allegany County, filed with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court for Allegany County,
their Applications for Licenses to sell Spirit
uous and Fermented Liquors at their places
of business in Allegany County as below
stated—
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, That all re
monstrances against the issuance of Licenses
to said Applicants must be filed with the
undersigned within TWENTY DAYS after
the filing of the Applications.
J. W. YOUNG, Clerk.
FILED TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1913
PETER ARNONE—PIace of business, Henkel
House, County Road, Morantown. Residence,
Eckhart Mines, Md. Owners of premises,
Henkel Heirs.
THROUGH
Sleeping Gars
TO CHICAGO
The Chicago Limited, with obser
vation parlor and club car, leaves
Frostburg 4:30 P. M., arriving
Pittsburgh 8:05 P. M., and Chicago
8:10 o’clock next morning. Train,
with sleepers, also leaves 3:27 A.
M., arriving in Pittsburgh 7:20 A.
M.
TO BALTIMORE
The Baltimore Limited, with
observation parlor and club car,
and coaches, leaves Frostburg
12:44 P. M., arriving in Baltimore
6:49 P. M. Also leaves 1 :43 A. M.,
arriving in Baltimore 7:53 A. M.,
Via the .
Western Maryland
LINES
THE FROSTBURG SPIRIT, FROSTBURG, MD.
i The First National Bank \
V %
FROSTBURG, MD.
Capital and Surplus - - - - $125,000.00
Assets (over) ------ $1,350,000.00
4 INTEREST PAID ON SAVINGS ACCOUNTS X
i i
4 Depository of the United States
| Depository of the State of Maryland
W Officers Directors W
ROBERDEAU ANNAN - - President Henderson Duncan Sinclair
X| OLIN BEALL Cashier Roberdeau Annan \d
WE INVITE YOU TO BECOME A DEPOSITOR
| ' ! The Hitchins Bros. Co ' Jj
j Grocery Prices Of Interest! 1
gg FLOUR
Sf. Gold Medal Flour in wood, per barrel $5.75
| Pillsbury’s Best Flour in wood, per barrel.. 5.75
SMassota Flour in wood, per barrel 5.75
Johnson’s Best Flour, in wood, per barrel. 5.75
IS ■ FEEDS
Best Shelled Yellow Corn, per bushel 95c
SBest No. 2 White Oats, per bushel 60c
Wheat, per bushel 1.20
H Buckwheat, per bushel 1.00
, Screenings, per bushel 80c
||fe Best Yellow Corn Feed Meal, per 100 lbs.. 1.75
Best Yellow Cracked Corn, per 100 1b5.... 1.75
Hit Best Corn and Oats Chop, per 100 lbs 1.75
H Schumaker’s Corn, Oats and Barley Chop,
per 100 lbs 1.65
Schumaker’s Scratching Grain,per 100 lbs.. 2.50
Schumaker’s Dairy Feed, per 100 lbs 1.65
lUI Bran, per 100 lbs 1.40
Shorts, per 100 lbs 1.50
Spl Get your raisins, currants, figs, dates, citron, lemon and orange peels and shelled nuts for
llltt 7 0Ur fruit cakes and other good.things —they are here nice and fresh. We carry only the very best pcpi
quality of high-grade goods in all of these various lines and we know that we can please you in gwra
[Up your selections. Don’t forget that we sell the famous line of |||tj
M TETLEY’S ENGLISH TEAS ■
||||| They are unsurpassed for excellent drinking qualities and we can specially recommend the Yellow pHH
S Label Brand at 55c per pound, the Green Label Brand at 65c, and the Red Label Brand at 75c,
They can be obtained in either straight black (India Ceylon) or green and black mixed. If you are
■| a lover of something better than the ordinary in good coffee ask for our selected Santos at 25c per
,5 lb. or our selected Santos and Macaibo Blend at 30c; but if you prefer the very best grade of goods
P||'=! on the market get a 1 lb. can of AB. Brand Genuine Mocha & Java at 45c per lb., in the 2 lb. SIR
p~%r~ can at 85c. UjST
.jHII We deliver goods promptly and can supply you with the best at the most reasonable prices. pUf
|||p Your patronage is appreciated and solicited. Respectfully ||||
I THE HITCHINS BROS. CO., j
jjj . . FEOSTBIIRG. MD. .P
Hay, per 100 lbs 1.10 pgCj
Straw, per 100 lbs 70c Hill
MEATS P
Armour’s Star Hams (none better) per lb.. 20c
Armour’s Sugar Cured Ham, good grade,
per lb 19c
Armour’s Star Breakfast Bacon, fancy qual
ity, (not sliced) per lb 27c PUll
Armour’s Star Breakfast Bacon, fancy qual- La-J
ity, (sliced) per lb 33c
Armour’s Star Boiled Ham (sliced) per lb.. 40c ||i§|
Armour’s Star Beef Knuckles, sliced (very
fine quality), per lb '4Bc
Armour’s Union Pure Leaf Lard, small jS|||
pails 57c ij&J
Armour’s Union Pure Leaf Lard, medium S||j
pails 95c
Armour’s Union Pure Leaf Lard, large
pails 1.90
Hold’s Niagara Fancy Leaf Lard (loose) jSfjf’]
per lb 16c Egia

xml | txt