OCR Interpretation


The Northern Pacific farmer. (Wadena, Minn.) 1878-1885, October 01, 1885, Image 1

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90059028/1885-10-01/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

I
Vol VIII. No
WEST.
5:00 a.m
*tioa.m.
MfclfcaJa.
41
SftrmJm.
Ar. 8:10 a.m.
De. 12:15 p. m.
M. L.
20.
General Directory.
ffADIHA POST
0FFIG1.
OPEN FROM^SO A. M. TO 8.-30 P.
*.
Sundays from 13 n. to 1 p.
MillekiN,RotoKl*«tit WP5*
Wallctbsss. going Wfestnt .8:30p.m.
Mall closes for Fergus Falls at 7 45*. m.
Mail closes tor PaAers, Prairie Mondays
ya'uVMoT^&gle Brad S»t»«day at.7i30 ajn.
Fonigi and Domestic Monty Own ltd Foetal
Ketes can be obtained "Jgjgfg^
LOOAL mil OASD Or H. R.
TBAIMS
oon*o wxsr.
No. 1,' Pacific Express, Dally 'J-JJP
No. 3, Mo. Rivet Express, Pally 4:W a. m.
No. 5, Bed Elver Exp. Pally exospt
Sunday
4
a
riy Sergeant.
TBUSTKES.—E.
G.
M. Mlgge.
S?
—i
jwp.®-
No. 29. FreUht. Daily except Sunday, 1:90 p.
NUNS
eoiMa
VAST.
No. 2, Atlantic Express, Dally Ml*m.
No.f St. P. Had Mpls. Express Daily tttSS p. m.
No. 6, StP. and Mpls. Ac. Daily Except
Sunday 10:58 n.m.
No. aoTYrelght Dally except Sunday. 10:58 a. m.
Freights Nos.», 30,31, and
32 carry passengers.
Stage* leave every Friday moraine at 7 o'clock
'or Lone Prairie, connecting with VA BtnkftB
tn KoiflHnJUliMiL
Stt^ijMiiWitan everj-Bcniajr «Sl
Tlinndif Qpr WricblitontM Parkers Prai
rie, ronneoilng at Parkers Prairie with stages
ror
Alexandria.
H, P. F. f. ft BLACK HILLS RAILROAD
TIMETABLE.
TMjikNGER.
FIRST-CLASS.
WADXHA^
EAST.
11:00 p. m. Ar.
10:53 p. m.
10:32 o.rn.
10:22 p. m.
10:11 p. m.
9:55 p. m.
9.41p.m.
9:30 p.m.
8:42 p. m.
7:35 p. m.
7:30 p, m. De.
WADENA,
Wadena Junction
Deer Creek,
Parkton,
Henning,
Viuing,
Clit derail,
Battle Lake,
Fergus Falls,
Breckenridge,
5:51a.m.
6:03 a.m.
6:55 a. m.
44
8:05 a. ra.
Wahpeton,
FREIGHT.
WADENA, IP:00 a. m. Ar.
O. M. KIXBKRLY,
VININO
Asst. Superintendent. Superintendent.
etlea.
WADEKA LOD&E MO. 156 A. F.S A. M.
Regular Commun
ications held Firs
and Third Fridays
in each month.
Visiting Brethren
cordially invited.
£. S. CASE, W. M.
C, A. COOOLAED, Secretary.
WAOEHA LOOSE *0.23, K.OF P.
Regular meetings
every alternate Monday
1
"ght, in Masonic Hall.
G. A. WHITNEY,
C. C.
W. L. NOKTHFOSS,
K. ofR.&.S.
WAOEM LODGE NO, SO, A. 0. U. W.
IOYER,
Hecretafy*
ttdrli
even.
W.
kt Maaouic Hall. J. K. MILLER,
F. BUEflH, Recorder.
MOPE LOOSE NO. 70.1.0.6. T.
W. C. T.
PASRAGUT POST NO. 102, S. A. R.
SMilur meetings the first and third Saturday
evening of each month. All comrades in go»
standing are invited and will be madewelome.
WADENA LIGHT GUARDS.
nights for drill everj Wedn^dg.
OOOSXT
Ornona.
AtrraroE—F. C. Field
TREASUKBK—Z. Handerson.
r. SHERIFF—C- M. Kingsley.
RcoisTER OF DKEDS—T,C. Thompson.
JUDGE
OF
PBOBATK.
T. F•
SUPT. OF
Ostrander.
SCHOOLS—John Harding.
CLERKOF COUBT—C. B. Bullard.
DEPUTYCLERK—T. F. Ostrander.
ATTORMEY—A.
G. Broker. ,,
JUDGES—Hon. Oi P. Stearns, Hon. R. Reynolds.
COIlJtlssloHEBS—W. R. Baumbach, C. A.Alton,
H. Lyons.
YaiiAai omcus.
PBESIDENT—M.J.Kstzky.
TsKAguuR—J- K. Miller.
KlCORDEn—A. L. Irwin.
M. Cooper, Frank Weizel, C.
JUSTICE OE THE PEACE—H.
MABSHAL—Geo.
p. Prcsson.
W. Carroll.
ATTORNEY—A-
Broker.
CONSTABLE—T.
Miller.
IMreotoryt
GRAIN ELEVATOBS.
A
Elevator Co. Farmers' Elevator Co.
noLLER FLOURING XILU.
M. Wrt»l*CJBnI))4OTSlwl|Ilu.
H.
B. MTT*11" Chas. Northfoss & Sons.
Wadena Exchange Bank.
R, Baumbach, Prest. A.L. Irwin, Cashier
RIAL ESTATE DEALERS.
Field4 Ostrander.
A. G.
Mu^.toe3r
GENERAL
MERCHANDISE.
Mcvet fc Coon. S'/'aSod.
DRY GOODS.
Peiie, 'HAM
W^»,*°""'
RUGGIB«.^e"-
Araos & Benedict. L. E Stinchour.
C. A. CrometL
JEWELRY STORE.
s. Metoger.
John Heinen.
0.
Jehn Cokely.
BOOT AND SHOE STORE.
L.Erlckson.
L.Er«mer
H. Palmateer.
MILLINERY STORES.
w.C, HM*.
Miss L. H. Jol
BARBER SHOP.
FXOTOOBAFHER.
rURNITTOE 1
O
•mff /tlmvfi. M« C00P6f«
a
1
WAWK
Ttac
•uiroriCTMMg.
7 .awln«l*o'»t.
JuU
„,JSS
CP^S01"'
Brockfc°t
""'SteTm?'
C. roller, 8. W.Tripp.
uniTnusr.
W.M.Kinne. HeMvBsrtrtt
E. M. Cooper. Becker^fcBohn
rHYSlClANS.
^^CnaM'
Dr.Ulf BrtKgk-c..
ATTORNEYS.
a
rmiillard. E. E. Luce.
A-
O. &Ser. Thorp A Baxter.
rf jf Qjinn(1ff A»Mnrtiy*
^V
CoPS°l!lcroRa
srr^ffi: M-BGjsas?d.
Geo. w. uaniel scribner.
I
FAIMTERS.
iHassaniLambert. AlexCotaoi.
D. B. filler. Q^cSiS
HASORS AND 1
B. B. Boyer.

H.
tended to, .1
Captain,
Offioial Directory
-"A ^:r
Professional urds.
ATTOBKBrAirfiGCnmseUJOR-U-LAV
HOTARY PUBLIC AMI
OolUollon
Office amW*denaExehange Bank.
•.• ...———•—————.
ittorier ml Couselo^AMif
NOTARY PUBLIC.
AND
CO UmELOR-AT-LAW
Collections promptly attend
ed to.
OFFICE
OVEB
SAMPLE ROOM,.
Front Street, IVadenq, Minn.
A flrst-class stock of Wines, Mineral waters and
igars eonstantl yon hand, also
ST. PAUL LASKB BUB.
D. KINNE Pioprietor.
H. Palmateer.
PKOFESSIUNAL SHAVER
AND
FASHIONABLE HAIR CUTTER.
Third St., Wadena.
Satisfaction guaranteed or no pay
Finest tonsorial rooms 011 the N. P.
Qy PRICE FOR SHAVING A COEP8E-S3.00.
W. H. Harris,
WADENA DRAY
Orders left at the postoffice will reoeive
prompt attention.
D. R. MORRISON, PROP.
All orders left at the City Dray of
fice will receive prompt attention.
RHODES & W ALKER,
DEALERS IN
VERNDALX, MINN.
Repairing of pumps a specialty.
Special points furnished when other
|xints fail. Wells bored by horse
power. Qrders by mail promptly
attended to. All work warranted.
G.M. MIGGE,
—-DEALER IN*—
SALT AND FRESH
HUB. 111 6mc.
ORDERS BY MAIL
PROMPTLY ATTENDED TA|
Third Street, Wadena.
WADENA,
1
Harris. W.H.Bemen£
'-K^r-n
VJAPU EXCHAMU Bun.
Physician
£&23>3
"'t ,l\-
Collections Woden* and aftoining
counties promptly attended to,
Money to Loan mtlteal Estate.
AQBNTvmfBl
American FiHtjIns. Co.,
OFPHILADEEPfllA.
And the Western AssufmibceCo., of I
Dr.L. W,Babcock,| g£
ourgeon.
[£7~A11 calls In the city or eonntry promptly
attended to. Offlee at'Amoe A Benedict's Drag
Btere, Third St., Wadena, Minn.
DENTISTRY I
Dr. W. NIVEN.
DENTIST, of Minneapolis, visit* Wadena every
two months. See local column. Special attention
given to the painless
extraction of teeth. All work
guaranteed, and pricee il low as consistent with
first-class work. Next tidt in October.1
A. A.^3LI$TGK
Surveyor CivflEngineer!
A N E A I N E
•nr
All calls
toe
work promptly at
OTEM» jWtn
MINNESOTA.
We Manufacture thrf^f
ASD PAffflf FLOOR
With the latest and moot improved Machinery
and also all grade* of feed. We gaarantee our
fiporto be an good as any manufactured in the
Northwest. Exchange and Custom work prompt,
ly done. Special attention gives to farmers.^ We
win pny the highest cash price for wheat.lv. AU
order* by mail pr«pptty attsnd*d to.
A|II»l*0«.^:g?.y5"''i'1f\C
»p
., &L
yllfefi,
jk~
—AND— We
rfronn I Ndrth British and Mercantile, of Iiondon and Edinburgh,
".'USS'| CLAYTON PLOW WORKS,
Main St.
FULL RIOOED
I pnATHTBiwn Aymt
SPECIAL
Stu bble Plow
Call and See Us.
*S
TO
ATTofflV,IMONEY TO H0A3S
T.F.09TRANDE&,JCBO*or
OFFICE OI
&
_^sTr
If You Want
On Long or Short Tizne,
AT RATES AS LOW? AS IHiUOWEl
Hartford, Conn. Phoenix, of Brooklyn, N. Y. Connecticut, of
Conn. New York Underwriters, New York German, of Freeport, III
Washington Fire and Marine, of Boston, Mass. The Fire Insurance Asso
ciation, London, England Phoenix Assurance Co., London, England Con
tinebtal, New Yori^
OFFICE ONE DOOR SOUTH OF WADENA EXCHANGE BANK.
Tlxlrd 0t*f W*dexu», Mlnui
HAVE JUST RECEIYED
A Large Inroiee ef
And Now Have the
Largest and Finest Stock
-OF-
IN WADENA COUNTY.
TMJBilt WlJLili
G. A. BARRON,
DEALER IN CHOICE
And Staple Dry Goods.
All kinds of Fresh Fruits in their season.
,11. CalUornia Dried Fruits a specialty.
Mf-
PRAIRIE 10R
SltmOBS
YVUK viUhiSA'iKl) UA{t^„ri.yiV8.
m-
k-'J.V
-T
.• ,ij%v
CASH customers invited to
Wadena.
WHEEL
tSMAN A
itodi
Wr'^'
I
1
PAPER OF ITASEIA
coumr.
±£=.
'At
•a?
ftttt* COUNTt. MNpffCtOTA.
••jiw'—Wia ahaM
j9|i'«ll!p9CpQBrTSQ9*^..
ya«,ln»dva»ee...............SI»
&22te
re?
fri,c-J ..
'W^TPSrciTSi: AiftxaaBs.
the
dotttftyFair.
I 'Oyir
Jifcymn hri* rtajtsedsinoe I waa^eMnt at
the 40i^AnnualFairof the. Wadena Ooonty Agri
Society. Y6«r country hacLthea a tainch'
qua)
Orient* oi
Hartford
er,&e roads bad and circunjstancesgen.
pro^itions.| The weathbr, especially,
iast you it that time and even the railroad
seemed to have joined in the conspiracy
your success by running its trains with
Irregularity. But you had a good fldr,
*nd went home much- pleased
I had peen and heard, aiifiaarm W
[ji the utility of agricuitttral societies and
hloc# and general. 1 jt^ink they ae
.« j^ent deal of good. l$ey stimulate
participate in them to a generous
to excelr and, by this means, add to the
!$S and characters of the products -of
||nas and stock and have a favorabl^Jtfdn
the entire community. In a newcojjntry
la lihinkit would add to the interest of
its resulting
from
cuse me for att.m^n« to ndvito you .CMcerni^g
what you have probably bestowed" tor mote
thought upon than I have and no doubt know
much more about.
To return to the natural current of tho address,
I proposed to deliver to yon, the introduction to
which I had not yet concluded, I will resume by
adding that some two weeks ago I was delighted
to receive from your President an invitation to at
tend this 5th Annual Fair. I wanted to be with
you again to come and see for myself what pro.
gress-you have made in the development or your
seetioic Of the State. Twe'years is a longtime
with hs in the Northwest when time's flight is
measured bv events. A great deal transpires
ithln a period, of even each limited duration. In
the older States one would hardly expect any
perceptible change to occur in so brief a space.
Scarcely anew building would be erected unless
fire, or some other calamity had Bwept away
thosethat existed and ones surroundings wanld
be so llttle altered as to. be unnotieeable. But
hem mutations are the rule, and, on returning to
locality after only a few weeks' absence. |we
expect to see nnmerous and important improve
ments, Xam not an old man yet, at least I. don't
so regard myself, bat it is since I attained n^ldcUe
life that the earliest settled parts of this State
were no more developed than Wadena, County
was two years ago, and that all this northern half
was a,
veritable terra incognito to other people
than Indians and a score or so of hunteraand ex*
plorers. Bean, wolves, lynx, foxes, coyotes and
other beasts of prey made traveling dangerous
especially in the forests the lakes and streams
abounded with beaver, otter and musk rats, and
the prairies afforded pasturage for buffaloes,
moose, elk, and other varieties of deer. It was a
Conntry too, for fish and water-rowl and the
latter were so numerous as to be indifferent to the
Nrasence of man and seemed not to have learned
hat he was an enemy. On coming hither at this
time I had expected to see that great changes had
jtsken place. The census returns, which give
jyour county a present population of 3,553 against
$t080~fiveyears ago, prepared me for palpable ad
rvonces but, for til that, I find the reality exceed
jlag my anticipations. You have outgrown, my
expectations chiefly in the substantiality of yoar
improvements and present a semblance of age dud
maturity that ought scarcely to be looked for
evea ln this land of wonderful growth. Alladins
explots with his magic lamp aud the powerful
geiiLwhich it summoned to his aid scarcely sur
patpiwhot has been wrought in this country, and
tighthere is W adena county, and if you have not
polished an enchanted lamp to accomplish it you
have oertainly done great, deal of industrious
tabbing of some sort to bring itall aboat.
•Your fair,in the extent and variety of its ex.
hibltet is quite equal to those of a.majority of the
older southern counties audit-Is not far behind
them In attendance. While I am but one
was
piAIBISKtlADRai
". WHEEL
BRDSHBEEAKm
WWR WHEEL
Stubble Plows.
mijfc
W a
your fairs if you were
department for plans of farm buildings,
^neam elaborate designs but plans of
buildings that aUght be made available to
ijitfiimited means. The object should bsuto
cheapness and convenience with the
fiagement for the well bdngoT rtock and
of food. A great deal of provender
every season in this State for w^nt of method
ing. lt is also desirable. provide shelter
inesy and ^kfaen not in nse. The
of proper career these is another source
tonjtlderable ions. Why could not these
be^made farther useful through the as
ito* of themembers at feir times and at other
[anient seasons in what might be termed ex.
Uioe meetiDgs when each member might re
la|e'the results he had achieved from his peculiar
of working in order thataU the members
dhave the benefit of the experience of each,
plan of impartlDg nserut and
shdaiaiOealeon Oovennaent
westof% Paul. ifownn^evS
jot
lit and Xadt^ iiifi Gen-
v-*ctlcal
in
ftfMtitD has been foand very advitntaseous in
i^teof the older States, and I cannot understand
w^r it would not be even more serviceable in a
ne^country. Itiaaomethinglhave oftsn thought
of^specially when I have Men new settleni ^me
int| thl* 8tate an& waste a great.4eal of tiuiie in^.
niog by npsriaoov how to fiini here, infco.
ly sUpposingthst thesystemstheyfollowedin
of
her
humblest citizens I have been so long identified
with this great State of Minnesota a^d have la
bored soenrnestly, if feebly* for the advancement
to prosperity and infiucene that I feel I have a
tight to rejoice over every, fresh evidence of her
glory and I do sincerely rejoice with yon in the
success ^you have achieved and tender you here
now my hsartiest congratulations together with
sincerest wishes fin your continued prosperity
But few yeara have passed apparently since the
hUi organizing tin Territory of Minnesota was
before the congressional house of. representatives
and when a member of average intelligence op
posed Its. passage on the ground that it-would in
volve a useless expenditure of public money. He
told the house that this entire region
ifps
utterly
worthless, Mve to Indians for tredaq| and lnm
barmen, and the military could givethem all the
government they needed. But -the bill passed
and the territerial government
Was'
established,
mne years later, just 29 yean ago now, the State
admitted to the Union. At that -time, how
ever, her claims for consideration a£the hands of
Congress were still looked upon
as
prosperous
and treated with ridicule.
Twenty-four years ago the war .of rebellion
began. Minnesota kad then about 175,000 inhab.
tontabntAe raised and sent to Washington for
the defonse of tbe country the first volunteer
reglsaeutand it proved itself one of the best
IK
the service. Nor was it tha only reglsMat. sent
from* the State to particlpate ln that colossal
•trill. Ten others of lnfantry, ,a battalion of
Osval^r, one of sharpshooter's and a battery of
aitiHery followedi though the State had the war
with the Siouic Indians on her hands meanwhile
a»d-fo«ght it threughn^ccessfkUy, But notw^tk-
as-
For a moment let us preview o^- population
statistics. In 1850 the State lud but fi,677 inhabi
tantsall told. 'Ten yean later it contaiaed
1870. S19S.80, in 1880, $330^1, sndin 1885 about
$388 In l870the country had-not fUUy recovered
from the consequences of the rebellion and the
Indian war. The latter caused the destruction of
a large amount of personal property and a very
considerable decline in the price of land, mean
while the population increased during the decade
closing at that time at the rate of 15X per cent,
per annum, but nearly all of this incerase, so far
oa it was supplied by immigration, really occurr
ed in the closing four years of the term and was
composed mainly of those who literally brought
nothing with them. To be added to this increase
6t wealth is another important item which does
net appear in the assessment rolls because railways
pay an especial tax. In 1869 the State was with
out railroads by 1870 there had been 1,072^ miles
built at a cost of $18,035,761, Ten years later the
miles of railway were 3,09&V$, costing $136,273,
533,SO. Last ye ir the number of utiles had increas
ed to 4,125 and the total cost to j$181,370,722,50.
There has since been added some 175 miles, mak
ing the extent of railways in the State to-day 4,300
miles, which represent an ^investment of nearly
$190,000,000. This means a further sua of $169,79
per inhabitants which, added to that above given,
raises the average amount of wealth per individ
ual to'$552,7d, and that too on the low valuation
peculiar to assessments for taxation. The true
average amount of wealth for each individual no
doubt approximates more nearly to $750,00. But
it is not probable anyone will denv that the State
has been prosperous'in an eminent degree. The
fact is too obvious for concealment. True, your
crops have not been always and uniformly &ood,
nor have you been paid for your surplus products
as high prices «jvery season as they ought to have
commanded. In divers manners and from num
erous causes your Incomes have been trenched
upon atid reduced until many of you have felt
sore and poor. Yet it is certainly true that the
grieat majority of farmers in this State have grad
ually grown richer with every passing season and
so far as my experience and observation extend
those whose gains have been most uniform and
proportionately greatest belong generally to the
class usually designated "small fanners" men
who farm from 80 to 160 acres and do their work
well. I don't think If Is a good State for bonanza
farming, but it strikes me that those gigantic en
terprises are always liable to come to grief no
matter where they may be situated. Nor are the
farmers of Minnesota alone in tholr steady accum
ulation of Wealth. The mechanics, laborers, pro
fessional men,! merchants, and in fact all classes,
participate In this good fortune for it holds good
as a general rule that when the agriculturists of
any country prosper the community generally
thrives with them. Nor do they Uve off of them or
prey upon them, as some of our modern socialistic
reformers pretend to beUeve, The mechanic,
laborer, miner and manufacturer are themselves
producer* of wealth and give to society an equi
valent for what they consume. The produceof the
farmers is necessary to their existence and what
they produce contributes to the welfare and hap.
piness of the farmer. Professional men and
merchants ire, likewise, necessary and the fact
that they cannot be dispensed with ought to be ac
cepted as sufficient evidence that they compensate
tociety by their services for what they use. Be
cause I have asserted that the termers of Minneso
ta, as a class, are growing constantly better off is
iM intimatiou that think you ought to be con
tent with your present circumstances. On the
contrary, I hope none of you will be contented
either with what you are or have but that you
will strive energetically to become ibetter and
richer every day, I do not regard contentments
praiseworthy element of character at all. It 1s the
esssntlal of savagery and laziness. Intelligent
people have no right to be contented bnt should
always endeavor to better themselves and their
circumstances. To better themselves they must
cultivate the virtues, especially charity towards
their neighbor!, which should extend to and cover
the opinions these may entertain. "Charity
covereth a multitude of tho sins" of thoee towards
when* we exercise it as these may be offensive to
tis and not of our own sins. remember. To better
our fortunes we must study to ascertain the causes
that Improve and those which impair them and
then to discover how to nurture and render
more effective the former, and to snake the latter
ss nearly as possible-Inoperative In your case
it
is very evidbnt, think, that your lortunee owe
their betterment to the excellent transportation
flMilities you have ei^oyed. Nearly forty yean
ago, whetfihers wire no railways there, I operat-
itluthw IttlAbmtaWMtmi
**i7-
fsopto «C«hf oUwrj I sold ajr corn at 10 ets per: bushel after hauling
SMJfi w»(lBWd^%k gpim Mirniw^H aaynol' I ItlSvlles totbe river. Tlw wbeat bronght3ict».
ly vmNjtMal^lelbrJtlte iKptsael eivULpedeoaiaani-1
at the milt, eats ls^tolo cts. Lafayette, 26
ttet«rtpaO(plM still rega^dad her claime as be- miles dlatanti' I don't remember what price the
lag Unworthy of seridas attentloa. Tbe-cllmnte pgfctoes were sold at. Tb* cost or growing these
wai 4tclai«d|oo- h/pei-bwean for tndaraace and ffftacts was batllttle different then .ftem what
the WjMolii
tegehort'locmatyMifo awiMH.1 'Jlllt—srjg Labor was cheaper ijara lmnds getting
tf^astabc^r. OitfXact date, that I fn»n 12 to SIS per month If hired pernianently,
dellirwed ttift fiintQUSfpeech) and
tnm,
tffeost Dtilutlh harbor, la wj^lch the fteetious I but not hj^intr tke labee-savlng machinery that
^eacriptlMi ^fahonle oC Piegan Xndlaiip drirlnga I ls noj£j#ose tbey cenld not do half the amount of
herd tf touAilpesi into the Zenith City eceart. He work that la now performed by an equal number
songjtf to cpgjir»y the iwprea^on,^ yosi recollect, la the eame time. The early asttlersof Ohio, In.
tlatiB^ yfpld be ttefiharaeter ^the^lye*-. diaoa, Illinois and eastern Iowa' accumulated
port Dt|l«th could aflbrd, and hen«, aecessity .wealth very much slower than you are doing and
Jbriaproringher harborexMsd. Vrhetber his op. hadprivntloni to endure that are unknown now
poartkm totbebUl tanking an ^proprtatkm ft* la-days except, perhapa»eiLthiBexti*me*t fkootiers.
the barborgiew ovt of igqamaofacgflutlfM mat-} Even in this state prior to 1867 and before the
tern not, thenpeneh certainly.waa jt ftto .«^iw I «aim»ads were built, thg Carmen had machhard
llohaf popular sentiment an thM«n|artSl^^[«" tk«® now. Dn ring the war and tlw coa
the sstddie and eastern Statea, and that senttomn tinunnoe of
.the strife with the ludiiuis his produce
wardueto. ignaranee- .Jtw speech .delayed the wan in d«m\ad and. high prices were obuined,
ndoptfcMi of the measure and very^abetaaHy |is bat he had to pay cof r^ajpondlng high piieea for
tiiijptfshed and'- extiqguished lts Aathor. Even labor and for what he bonKht His fortunes have
since {received a letter from *n Indiana man improved steadily since and have kept par? with
would incur I
about
fair education batlacked
cuirentevevtsandwas
Itvp&nsible t^^)his ^mntry 'had^d^eloped so I facilities is yon have no a?ubt perceived, and
rapidly.' I refer to these matters lB order tp Jm-1 mtwUhstanding that you havefreqoent cause to
pnesofkwltha.realixing senae«fthe rapid giowth I compUdft of the gre^l and tyninny of the railway
of oureountry. Liviag here in the midst of these icomj^taiM/ 'Or more correctly speaking of their
bthqr neeucsaml noting the details of each day's I officer«.5rou certainly could net very well dispeuse
advancement, we (all to apprteVUe tbe wohderfuT
to believe
i'with
celerityof theagiregate improvemenVandarel relief from theinjustice of these companies (0 is
then astonished that peop]e at dia^nce-c innot with you a questioa of p»nunount importance.
believe the story with wh|eh we hw^ .become so
fiuniliar that It is neither miraculojjei aor wondor
fuL Why, we gmw so fast tiiatmappublishers do
not pretend to keep pace with us. Within the
pact few months long lines of railway have been
completed nnd villages have sprung' up. along
them that you will not expect to find on the very
latest map of the State. I have had to endure a
good deal of scoldings myself because of my inabil*
ity to anticipate the development ofiocaHtiea in
my descriptive pamphlets for the State Board, of
Immigration, and havebeeh made v^ry sorry that
ever attempted to say what were-the nnmbers of
inhubitants of the cities andjv|nages. ^4U of
theae seemed to have increa^ itf^^prlced^nted
rat!o whije tbe work was in eouxmof pi^^fitition.
tit,-
02a,beiug an increMe of 2,7r89per cent or of273 c.
per annum. In 1870 the number^had groWn to
43SJ.407, or at the rate of 15^ per cent per annum
for that decade. The denlcensds' ofJ830 gave
us 780,773, a rate of 7% per cent annually for that
ten.years. The recent State census shows that we
now have about 1,119,000, the annual rate of. in
crease lor the past five yearn Mog nearly 9 per
and this in the rateof increase we must consider
when we think of this subject in connection with
the opinions of people outside of the State concern,
ing it in order to appieciato their' occasion -for
•surprise 1' .• *.
Another indication of the development of a
country is the augmentation of its wealth. As
shown by tin assessments for taxation the rate of
increase of wealth in Mlnneeota from 1860 till 1870
exclurive of railwayii, educationarestablishments,
churches and public property was 1,872 per cent,
about 137 per cent per annum from 1870 tilt 1880it
was nearly 290 per cent or 20 per cent-per annum,
and from 1880 to 1881 hot far from 12# per cent
per annum. The faUlng off In the lost term re*
suiting from a deci^ in prlosa- wa« mOre appor-
rS Si -.
ISSSn^i
Trom
91,25 to-Simper day during harvest
increase, of his transportation facilities. In
ftom.SB to 40 et*. pes busbftt'Wliile the coet. of
growing it was even moretfaan it is hereto-day.
It fbllows then that your better circum^aaces are
mainly due to these augmented tnunportation
the rodds. How then can you best obtain
The answers raised to this sire-that one wealthy
company wlll eithor buy up these competitive
Unes or.will consolidate with them or they will
combine una agree upon & tariff ef rates to suit
themselves and thus prevent competition amongst
themselves.: This Is true and it is a very natural
course for them to pursue, yet the building of
moreroads oertainly has effected a Very consider
able reductlen of rates. This is proved by com
paringthe rates now ruling in this state with thoee
thnt prevailed say fifteen years ago. In 1870 the
Winona and St. Peter branch of the
A
11008
cent. For the whole 35 years the average rate of 1 £ers tariffs is patent to all who study the subject.
inM*ffw» hosb en 623 8.23 per cent /peranum.
I
0n®
C.
& N, W
system of roads was conspicuous throughout the
northwest for Its exorbitant charges, bat the
building oft he branch lines and feeders ot the
M. !cSt. P., and the absorption by the company
owning the latter of the Southern Minnesota and
Hastiugsand Dakota roads compelled the north
western to adopt a more generous policy towsrJs
its patrons. Meanwhile the multiplication of Its
branches and spur lines and the absorption by
theC.
N. W. Co,, of the St. Paul Sioux City
recipiosal influence on ths C. M.
a St. Paul. They covenant with each other'and
peol and arrange to keep their rates up, but do
gpite of all the fact that they have compelled each
other to radical reductions of freight and passen
reason why the multiplication of railroads
why the multiplication
must tend to reductions of charges in a sparsely
settled country like this is that It divides the
business and lessens the amounts obtained by in
dividual lines unless measures are taken to pre
vent sack result, and one method of preventing
this is for the companies theniselves to do all in
their power to attract additional settlers into the
contiguous territory. They certainly could not
accomplish this result by maintaining such un
reasonable rates for carrying away the surplus
products ofthe farmers as to leave the latter with
out any profit on their investments and labor.
It is not the railroads alone that have made this
State whit it is. Oar facilities for water trans
poiiatiiim luve bpea a. tkrmore important fsbtor.
It1s-largely, to the possession of these that, we owe.
additions to oar rafl wayi'depsnd lira great meas
ure on their improvement. Through the lakes we
can reach seven of onr greatest and richest State
and much of Canada and will utimately be able
to ship directly to foreign countries without break
ing bulk. By the Misssissippi river and its largs
tributaries we cau communicate directly with a
territory of immense extent and unsurpassed
ichness, and with a signal transfer of cargo can
end our produce to all parts of the world, es pec
ially to Central and South America and the
West Iodia islands. We should allow no occa
sion to influence the maintamance and improve
ment of these highways of commerce and travel
to pass by unimproved. They should have our
first and mest earnest efforts. Next to them-the
Red River of the North might come in for a large
share of our attention. Its improvement puts us
in communication by (water with the wealthy and
fast growing providence of Manitoba and, through
the lakes and rivers beyond, with the extensive
and productive northwest territory. If the pro
ject of an ocean route through Hudson's bay should
prove feasible, which is not at all likely, it would
butojpen' for as a third avenue of transportation
by water to the Atlantic Ocean. Bnt where we
must mainly expect to be gainers from the im
provement of Red river will be in having the pro
duce of the northern country brought to some river
portjon our western border and shipped thenco
across the State either to lake Superior or the Mis
sissippi river. It is vain to suppose that Canada
can compel the bulk of that produce to go by way
of Thunder bay, for it is a law of commerce that
traffic will seek the -shortest, quickest and cheap
est route, and legislation cannot permanently
divert it into unnataral channels. As the country
on the upper Missouri river develops, the people of
this State will also be deeply interested in its im
provement for many of the products of that upper
region will find their best markets in the eastern
States, to which they can be m«st quickly and
cheaply sent by way of/ail teDuluthand reship
ment thence to their destination. But besides hese
we have very important local water ways within
the State. The Minnesota aid Upper Mississippi
rivers, for instance, and even some of the smaller
streams and interior lakes. The improvement of
these will be required in future] by local traffic
and thatthey will be improved Ihave no doubt.
What I would now urge yon to do is to push the
claims of the most importantr—the Mississippi and
great lakes first. Insist npon it that your repressn
tative in Congress shall exert himself in their be
half and thatyour members of the State Legislature
shall useall their Influence in the same direction.
Meanwhile encourage new railroad enterprises and
the extension of existing lines. You are not likely
to get too many of them and they all will contri
bute to develop and enrich the 8tate and facilitate
the increase of your own fortune.
Hoping that Ihave succeeded in entertaining
youtoadegree that will compensate for the time
you have spent in listening, I most sincerely thank
yon for the kind attention with which I have been
favored.
IMPORTANT
When you visit or leave New York City, save
Baggsge Expressace and Carriage Hire and stop
at the titand Oniou Hotel, opposite Grand Central
Depot.
Elegant rooms fitted up at a cost ef one million
dollars, reduced to $1.00 and upwards per day.
European plan. Elevator. Restaurant supplied
with the best. Horse cars and. stages and elevat
ed raid road to all depots. fTamili es can live better
for less money at tne Grand Union Hotel than at
any other first-class hotel in the city.
Summon*.
STATE OF MINNESOTA,
District Court 11th Judicial District,
Counties of Wadena & Hubbard,
Thomas
A.
Abbott, M. E. S. Bergsma, 1
andW. P. Abbott, co-partners as)
T. A. Abbott & Co., and Pruden
Stove Company, Plaintiffs,
vs. I
Frank Gundllng and Mattie Gund- Summons
ling, his wife, Gee. A. l'reston and
M. Preston, his wife, George L. Kar
weU, Aaron M. Ozmuti and Freder.
ick Jackson and J. W. Jay, Defend
ante
The State of Minnesota, to the above named de
fendants
You, said defendants, are hereby'summoned
and required to answer the Complaint in this
action, which has been filed with the Clerk of
saidCouri, and to serve a copy ef your Answer to
the said Complaint on the sunscr.bers at their of-
In room 66 National German Atnerlcun Bank
iding, St. Paul, Ramsey county, Minnesota
iln tweiity day S alter the eery ice of this sum
upon yea. exclusive of the day of anch
e, and lr you tall to answer the said Com*
plaint within the time aforesaid, the Plaintiff in
this action will take judgment against you IS
the relief in their CoinpUint demanded.
JonN B. & W. H. SANHOKN,
Plaintifi's AU'ys, St. Paul, Minn.
Terms: $i.so Per Year fl
I me IhefitthAnnnairAirel
the
Wmfmmm
Cemsty ilgri*
calcaml Seciety.
CATTLE.
Article. Owner Premium.
Jersey ball~A. I/ingley 1-t
Wretta Paddock.... ...-A1
Jersey cow—H. II. Hamlin.....' 4i/..l*t
Lorrtta Psddock 2d
Short horn bull—B. WaTteT. 1st
Adam Keller ........fc.....3d
HORSES.
Best stallion, Norman—A. Aller..... ........1st
A-UangJey.,...
Frank iiMer. 3d
Brood mare with foal by side—J. Knlcbt 1st
J. Knight ad
Sucking colt—J. Doty.. Dip
Draft tcaiu^Adim Keller...... let
C.O. Lewjoy-...- 1st
Thos.- Eobb.. «^......21
Pair matched roadsters—J. Doty
Ladies carriage horse driven single—
O-M. Langley—1st
SHEEP,
Best ram—Thos. Power.... 1st
Wm. Hallett 2d
Best pen of ewes—Thos. Power 1st
Wm. Hallett f. 2d
SWINE.
Best pen of swine—Ben Burton 1st
Berkshire boar—J. H. Montgomery— &1
CH1CEKS8.
Bbat trio—Falisb—J. H. Montgomery. 1st
,... Plymouth Rocks—J. McKay 2d
.H-Montgomery. lip
8. Reynold* U~u
Brown ijeghorik-J. Kicnhoiz Dip
Black Dip
Silver Pheasant—Ben Burton .iiip
TURKEYS.
Eight Bronze—S. Reynolds ^..Ist
FARM PRODUCTS. V'
Two socks straight flower—M. Weizel A Co— let
Uiie-iourth sack corn meal—M. Weizel&Co—1st
CHAINS AND GRASSES^
Best display of cereals in straw—W. E-ITarber.lst
native and cultivated grasses—
W. Barber. 1st
Best bu. spring wheat—F. L. Handerson 1st
Gee. Stewait. 2d
Thos. Powers Dip
Best 'A bu. Welman Fife wheat—H. W. Kuller.it.'.
H.W. Lock..-Dip
Best Vi bu.JSaskatcbewan wheat—H.W.Lock .Dip
Bestl bu. White oate—Wm. Anderson 1st
W.E. Barber 2d
Best bu. flint corn—F. L. Hxndersoiu 1st
Amelia Camray 2d
Best \t, bu. dent corn—1* Bnite Dip
A. Packard Dip
Best# bu. King Philip corn—S. I). Reynold*..Dip
Best ii bu. spring barley—W. E. Barber 2d
Best bu. winter Tye—J. Askew 2d
ROOTS ASD VEGETABLES.
Best variety of vegetables from one garden—
W. M. Barber....2d
Three varieties early potatoes—Win. Hallett.. .1st
Bestbu. early rose potatoes -F. L. Handerson.hit
W.M. Barber....,sal
Best bu. Pearl of Savory potatoes—
S. W. Reynolds Dip
Bestpk. early rose potatoes—C.
C..Robinson...,sal
Yicks extra early potatoes—
C. Robinson 2d
Best pk. magnum bonum potatoes—
J. H. Montgomery 2d
Bcetbn. White Elephant potatoes—
C.C. Robinson....2d
Four heads drum head cabbage—J. McKay.....
1st
Geo. Stewart. .%1
Three flat dutch cabbage—H. W.Lock Dip
NorthernMammctli cabbage—H.W. Lock....D.p
Four red cabbage—Geo. Slewart 1st.
Six bunches kale—J. McKay ls-t
Two field pumpkins—W. M. Barber 1st
P. Brate al
Two sweet pumpkins—C. C. Robinson 1st
Three hubbard squashes—P. Brate 1st
Two squashes—P. Brate .'.sd
Doz. ears popcorn— W M.Barber 1st
Doz. ears Kice pop corn—W. M. Barber 1st
Bu. white turnips—Geo. Stewart 1st
Ba. white globe turnips—S D. Reynolds Dip
Bu. rata bagas—Geo. Stewart 1st
Peck Weathcrford onions—H. W. Lock Dip
Bnnch rhubarb—A. R. Wiswell Dip
Tomatoes—A. R. WisweU let
Geo. Stewart Dip
Doz. Sugar beets—J. H. Montgomery Dip
Doz. manselwnrzel—Geo. Stewart 1st
H. W. Fuller... Dip
Doz. parsnips—C. C. Robinson 1st
Doz. Salsify—C. C. Ilobinson 1st
Geo. Stewart Dip
Best pk. bush beans—Wm. Hallett 1st
C.C.Robinson 2d
Doz. Orange carrctts—Jos. Askew 1st
•. Geo. Stewart.... ad
oirsWMtiNntbts-i-A:.- Oamray .-.Dip
Six citrons—Jos. Askew 1st
Doz. stem scelery—Geo. Stewart lnt
Six heads sunflowers—Geo. Stewart 1st
Best pk. bush beans—Wm. Hallett 1st
PLOWING MATCH.
Best acre plowing—Andrew Arbuckle 1
J. Valentine 2d
HOUSEHOLD AKTICLES.
Loaf of wheat bread—Mrs. A. R. Wiswell
..1st
..2d
..lFt
..lft
..1st
..1st
..1st
Mrs. H. Weizel
Loaf Brown bread—Mrs. A. R. Wiswell
Tjnofrolte—Mrs, A. K. Wbwell
.Fruit cake—
Sponge
Roll jelly cake—Mrs. J. Valentine
Mrs. A. R. Wiswell
Marble Cake—Mrs. A. R. Wiswell 1st
Tin of cookies—*• l^t'
Tin of ginger cookies—Mrs. A. R- Wiswell is.
Tomato preserves—Mrs. A. R. Wiswell.........1st
Rhubarb 1st
Mrs. W. W. Young 2d
Citron preserves—Mrs. A. R. Wisweil 1st
Mrs. W. W. Young 2d
Raspberry preserves—Mrs. A. R. Wiewell 1st
Pickles—Mrs. A. R. Wiswell 1st
Sweet pickles—Mrs. A. It. Wiswell ist
Tomato catsup—" ist
Chow Cohw— ....1st
Pie Plant preserves—Mrs. W. W.Young 1st
Canned strawberries—" 1st
blueberries—
k*
1st
DAIRY.
Jar butter—Mrs. Wm. Anderson (protested )...lst
ar of butter—Wm. Lovejoy
Wm. Hallett Dip
Roll of butter —Wm. Davidson
J. Valentine .Dip
FRUITS AND FLOWERS.
Cc'l :ction of home plants—Mrs. A. It. Wiswell.
1st
Specimei in bloom— .1st
roses— ,1ft
Floral ce'ign—Mrs. A. R. Wiswell 1st
Pair hanging baskets—Mrs. A. R. Wiswell 1st
TEXTILE FABRICS.
Home spun yarn—Geo. Stewart 1st
Mrs. Jas. McKay 2d
Homekn't seeks—Wm. Hallett Dip
Log cabin quilt- Mrs. Wm. Davidson 1st
S. D. Reynolds :#d
Patch work quilt—S. D. lteynolas D:p
Mrs. Nyberg Dip
nome spun home made dress—S. D. Reynolds. 1st
Fancy qnilt—Mrs. J. D. Lamberson 2d
Mrs. Chas. Northfoss.... ?:p
Scrap quilt—Mrn. II. W. Lock Dip
Chi Ids Knit shirt—Mrs. T. Robb 1st
Fancy needle work—Mrs. A. R. Wiswell lat
Sixteen yds. rag carpe!—M#s. N. L. Jones 1st
Kn.t quilt—Miss Emma Katzky 2d
Hand made splasher—Mrs. S. W. Tripp.-. 1st
Bed Spread—Mrs. U. Lane 1st
FANCY WORK.
Fancy Tidy—Mrs. A. R. Wiswell ......1st
2d
Mrs. F. B. Coon Dip
Mrs. Wm. Anderson Dip
Crochet tidy—Wm. Hallett D,p
Mrc. A. R. Wiswell Dip
Upholstered chair—Mrs. J. D. Lamberson let
Sola pillow—Mrs. J. D. Lamberson 1st
Sofa cushion—Mrs. Wm. Anderson D:p
Mrs. T. Rolib Dip
Canvas tidies—Mr*. A. R. Wiswell lt
Crochet t"ilet set—Mrs. A. R. Wiswell 1st
Toilet set—Miss Emma Katzky l.-t
Lamp mtt—Mrs. A. R: Wiswell 1st
Toilet cushion—Mrs. A. R. Wiswell 1st
Fancy needle work—M.sn j&mma Ivatzky 1st
ART DEPARTMENT.
A. J. Amos 1st
Oil painting—Mrs.
Dp
Rawson Dp
Collection of oil painting*--Mrs.J.D.LamL erson/'d
Water color paint ngs—Mrs. T. M. Young 1st
MISCELLANEOUS STOCK CLASS.
Best Sow—William Hallet let
Yoke work oxen—Wm. Hallett let
Graded short horn bull—G. W.Taylor 1st
Graded Stallion—G. W.Taylor is:
Polled Angus bull—C. C. Lane 1st
Yearling colt—C. Archillas 1st
Graded heifer—Richard Elliott 1st
Two year old colt—J. Valentine 1st
MISCELLANEOUS CLASS.
Canaries—Amelia Cam way Dip
Virginia ied birds—J. Doty Dip
Golden Robin—J. Doty
Display of patterns—Mrs.Tengpr & Miss Fish.
Nat'igarment cutter .Dip
IIOME MANUFACTURES.
liookand Ladder truck—Theo. Brockhof 1st
Farm Wagon—Theo. Brockhof i«t
Lghtfarm wagon—Theo, Brockhof 2d
Sample material for mf'g wagons—T.Brockhof.1st
Farm wagon—J. Swindle hurst It
New pl lathe—Theo. Brockhof »d
Two sets bob sleds—Chas. Northfoes &
Office desk-Chas. Northfoss & Sons....
Display or wood turning aud scroll
Chas. Northfoss
A
Sons.. I
Ox oyke—Thos. Powers Di.i
Light double set harness—J. C. Schulte is.
Heavy harncss-^J. C. Schnlte id
Single 1st
Ox Si
Pat. double fnrrow stubble plow—J. Clayton...
1st
Sixteen inch self holding stubble plow-
John Clayton lat
Fourteen inch wood beam—John Clayton 2i
CLASS Z.
Handsomest baby—Mrs S. L. Fraz'er 1«t
Mrs. C. II. Xortufoss 11

xml | txt