OCR Interpretation


The daily pioneer. [volume] (Bemidji, Beltrami Co., Minn.) 1903-1904, July 10, 1903, Image 2

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90059049/1903-07-10/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

The Daily Pioneer
PUBLISHED EVERY AFTERNOON,
EDWARD KAISER, Publisher.
Enter I'd, in tin- jpStofflcg,a UtMiiidji, JUiim^.
laYse 'oiul class tnai tor.
Official County -'and City Paper.
NOTICE TO ADVERTISERS
Copy for changes at advertisements In
The Daily PJonesr must reach this office by
10 o'clock a. m. in order to insure their
appearance in the Issue of same day.
BURY THE HATCHET.
The youthful editor of the
Daily Pioneer is willing to
let the amusing and childish
battle of words which lias been
going on between this paper and
the Bemidji |Sentinel com:' to an
end. Remarks of his were attri
buted" in yesterday's Santinel to
anold]and experienced editor of
well-known and undoubted abil
ity. To a boy who his been a
member of the*|prof ession less
than two years this is decidedly
complimentary, to say the least.
It wipes out any slurs which may
have been made in the p.ist. By
their own statements the editor
of the Sentinel and |hts attorney
assistant admit that the Daily
Pioneer man has scored the most
points, but they dislike to admit
that he Ins done this without
assistance. As the Daily Pioneer
did not find it necessary to
descend to mud-slinging the vic
tory is all the more complete.
The Sentinel] editor attempted,
with the assistance of an ass, to
(Oraw)ford the waters of ridicule
into which his comical^attemptt.)
injure the Daily Pioneer had
thrown him butjtho] poor ass
sank below the waters, being of
insufficient strength to carry the
double burden to shore, and the
Sentinel man is left floundering
ludicruously about on the sur
face.
Thus are we willing] to bury
the hatchet. We would not strike
a man when jhe was down, any
way-. ___^_____
THE RIOTING IN INDIANA.
The authorities at Evansville,
Ind., have shown injthe presence
of public tumult a clear and level
headed conception of duty and a
brave determination to uphold
the law against the mob. When
the militia fired upon the rioters
six were killed Jand fifteen
wounded. As usual, some of the
victims were innocent spectators,
but their blood is upon the heads
of the persons responsible for
the riot. The tragedy might be
expected to effect a sobering
effect upon the community and
bring the three days' rioting and
the threats of race war to a close.
If it does not, the governor of
Indiana should send additional
force to the spot. Indiana can
not afford to encourage feudists
and compete for thej(bad reputa
tion of I the mountain districts of
Kentucky.
DR. NELSON,
A GIRL
A
a retiring 'city
physician of Minneapolis, thanks
hisenemies for gettinghim ousted
from office. Whatever other ac
cusations may be made against
the doctor by his enemies they
can not say that he is a nessimist
^in Columbus, S. C,
stood off with 7a rille-.a mob of
armed men which was out on a
lynching bee. It might be a
good idea to arm a squad of the
fair sex at Evansville, Ind., where
the great race war is now going on.
WORK has appeared entitled,
"Advice to Plain Girls." Need
less to say, none of the books
have been ordered by Bemidji
stores. QUARRELS LEAD TO TRAGEDY.
John Mitchell Shoots His Wife and
Then Commits Suicide.
Boise, Idaho, July 10.John Mitch
ell, a Grand Army veteran and a menv
ber of the legislature during the
Shoup and Sweat senatorial fight, yes
terday shot and severely wounded his
wife and then, locking himself in his
room, shot and killed himself. The
Mitchells had had numerous quarrels
over property
i er^i
QUIET AT EVANSVILLE.
Court House and Jail Still Guarded by
M'Jitary.
Evansville, Vat., July 10.The court
house and jail arc still guarded night
and day by the Martinsville and Ev
ansville companies of militia. There
were five nrrests yesterday on grand
jury indictments for the rioting Sun
day night-. All were released under
bond.
The coroner heard evidence yester
day on the shooting of Monday night.
He has not returned a verdict. There
wore no more deaths yesterday* There
were two funerals of mob victims yes
terday afternoon. August Jordan and
Hazel Allman were buried quietly.
The Allman funeral was held a day
sooner than announced in order to
Ijretenftj'xeituTiio'.-pt. The-, police- say
that while many of those shot by the
militia were reputable persons anu no
doubt drawn into the crowd from curi
osity, two or three of those killed were
disturbers and had caused the police
trouble before. A revolver found on
one of the dead bodies had three
empty chambers that had recently ex
ploded.
BIDS FOR HELP.
Negro Labcr-ars Sell Themselves at
Auction as Harvest Hands.
Topeka, Kan., July 10.A special to
the State Journal from Russell says
two negroes yesterday were bid for on
the auction block for harvest work.
They are JOtm and Harper Porter,
known as good workers. The bidding
was spirited, starting at $2.50 per day.
August Rejnhart finally secured them
on a bid of $3:21 per day. Adam
Bender wa.^ the auctioneer. At Vic
toria, ji:.si over the line, in Ellis coun
ty, another colored man asked for bids
for an employe who would pitch to the
stack all the grain "a one-header"
could cut. On this condition the negro
brought a $6 per day bid.
HAD PLANNED A WAR.
Norway Politicians Were Ready to
Lead an Army Into Sweden.
Christiania, July 10. Bjornsterne
Bjornson, in an animated controversy
with Mr. Slang, ex-minister of war, dis
closed the fact that that official sup
ported the bellicose politicians who
actually planned war with Sweden in
order to dissolve the union. Stang re
lied upon the fact that the Swedish
army was in course of reorganization,
and, presumably, unable to strike
quickly. He planned to mobilize the
Norwegian army and to march across
the frontier to prevent the mobiliza
tion of the two western Swedish array
corps.
PLANNED TO ESCAPE.
Jailer Finds Six Saws in the Cells of
Condemned Murderers.
Lexington, Ky., July 10.Jailer Rob
ert Wallace has defeated a plan for
escape arranged by Claude O'Brien,
who, with Earl Whitney, is condemned
to be executed July 24. The jailer
searched their cells and found in
O'Brien's cell six saws. This is the
second time that O'Brien has been
supplied with steel saws. His mother
wrote him the first time that twelve
saws were coming from Memphis.
Both letter and saws were intercepted.
EFFECTS IDENTIFIED.
Undoubtedly It Was Delehanty Who
Went to His Death.
Buffalo, july 10.Frank Delehanty
of Syracuse, brother of Ed Delehanty,
and other relatives identified the
satchel that was left in the Pullman
sleeper and the hat found on the Inter
national bridge last Friday morning as
those of Ed Delehanty. There is,
therefore, no doubt that the man who
fell through the drawbridge that
morning was Ed Delehanty, outfielder
of the Washington team of the Ameri
can league. ALL RECORDS SMASHED.
St. Paul Boy Makes Highest Possible
Shooting Record.
Lake City, Minn., July 10. All
shooting records of the Minnesota
State guard were broken yesterday
morning by Sergt. Arthur E. Clark,
Company B, of 691 Osceola avenue, St.
Paul. Sergt. Clark hit the bull's eye
twenty consecutive times at distances
of 200 and 300 yards. Capt. Lee, in
spector of small arms, says this breaks
all former records.
Troops to Guard Jail.
Atlanta, Ga., July 10. Gov. Terrell
late last night ordered out the Griffin
Rifles at Griffin, Ga., to guard the jail
ia which James Bethune. a white man,
is confined, charged with attempting
to assault his daughter. It was re
ported to the governor that threats
had been made to lynch Bethune.
Green Assumes His Duties.
Washington, July 10.Civil Service
Commissioner Green arrived yester
day from his home in Minnesota and
immediately assumed his duties. All
three members of the commission are
now on duty for the first time since
the retirement of Mr. Garfield last
spring.
Dam Gives Way.
Morristown, Minn., uly 10. The
Hershey mllldam across the Cannon
river here washed out, causing the
shutting down of the gristmill for the
season. Much damage will be done
by the flooding of meadows.
Small Boy Badly Hurt.
Blue Earth, Minn., July 10. In a
runaway little Cecil Scoles received
serious injuries. His companion es
caped by jumping. A collision with
another rig took off a wheel and the
horse ran away.
NEWS IN BRIEF.
Overflow From the Wires in a Con
densed Form.
J. M. O'Brien of Montana passed the
examination and was admitted as a
midshipman to the naval academy.
Henry Hansen, editor of the
Foundry, died" at Mount Clemens,
Mich., of apoplexy. He was a native
of Denmark.
It has been announced at the state
department that David Warburg has
been appointed United States consul
at Barbadoes, W. I.
Capt. Stromberg of Illinois has
brought officially to the naval depart
ment's notice the efficient services of
the naval militia at Alton, ill., during
the flood.
The charge d'affaires at St. Peters
burg informs the state department of
the appointment of Mr. Alexandrowis
ki as chamberlain to the Russian sec
tion of the St. Louis exposition.
A. M. Ross, manager of the Empire
Trust and Securities company, was
committed at Newark, N. J., in de
fault of $.J,0()0. The company of which
he was manager is alleged to be a
"get rich quick" concern.
Gen. Bates has informed the war
department that nine regiments of
militia from the Middle States and
thirty companies of regular troops will
assemble at camp at West Point, Ky.,
for the maneuvers and instruction.
The navy department has decided
to allow the European squadron tore
main about a week longer than was in
tended in English waters. Orders
were sent to Admiral Cotton to leave
in time to arrive at Lisbon on the
22d insfc
At a meeting at Los Angeles, Cal.,
of the local committee and the com
mittee sent by ".he book committee of
the Methodist church, the final papers
were signet, arranging for the next
general conference of the church In
Los Angeles In May, 1004
Latest Quotations From Grain and
Live Stock Centers.
St. Paul, July 10. Wheat No. 1
Northern, S484 1-2c No. 2 Northern,
83(583 l-2c No. 3, [email protected] no grade,
7p'(g7-5c. CornNo. 3, 47 l-2c No. 4,
46c no grade, 4uc. RyeNo. 2, [email protected]
49c. BaneyMalting grades, [email protected]
feed grades, 39!g 44c.
Minneapolis, July 10.Wheat No.
1 hard 87 l-4c No. 1 Northern,
86 l-4c No. 2 Northern, 85 l-4c.
Duluth, July 10. Wheat No. 1
hard, 87c No. 1 Northern, 85 l-2c No.
2 Northern, 84c oats, 36 [email protected] rye,
50 l-2c flax, $1.00 3-4.
Milwaukee, July 10. Wheat No.
1 Northern, 88(?r89c No. 2 Northern,
[email protected] RyeNo. 1, [email protected] Barley
No. 2, 5860c. Oats. 42 l-2c. Corn
September, 51 l-8c.
Chicago, July 10. Wheat, No.
2 red, 83c: No. 3 red, 75 (ft 80c No. 2
hard winter, 80c No. 3 hard winter,
76 80c No. 1 Northern spring, 85c
No. 2 Northern spring, 80 [email protected]
No. 3 spring, 7580c. CornNo. 2,
[email protected]: No. 3, 51 51 l-4c.
OatsNo. 2. 4040 l-2c: No. 3. 39 1-2
@40c
Sioux City, Iowa, July 10. Cattle
Beeves, $4 5.10 cows, bulls and
mixed, [email protected] stockers and feed
ers, [email protected] calves and yearlings, $2.50
@3.85. Hogs, [email protected] bulk, $5.50.
Chicago, July 10.CattleGood to
prime steers, [email protected] stockers and
feeders, $2.75(5 4.60 cows, [email protected]
heifers, [email protected] Texas-fed steers,
[email protected] HogsMixed and butch
ers, [email protected] bulk of sales, [email protected]
5.85. Sheep -Good to choice wethers,
[email protected] fair to choice mixed, [email protected]
3.75 Western sheep, [email protected] na
tive lambs, [email protected]
South St. Paul, July 10. Cattle
Good to choice steers, [email protected] good
to choice cows and heifers, [email protected]
good to choice stock steers, $3.25
3.50 good to choice stock cows and
heifers good to choice milch cows,
[email protected] HogsPrice range, $5.40
5.65 bulk, [email protected] SheepGood
to choice shorn lambs, [email protected]
good to choice yearling wethers, $4.50
@5 heavy, [email protected] good to choice
ewes, medium weight, $3.85 4.10
heavy, $3^*[email protected] culls and stock
ewes, [email protected]
A WE8T VIRGINIA CROESUS I
Henry G. Davis Has Had Rapid Rist
to Affluence.
Henry G. Davis, formerly United
States senator from West Virginia,
does not figure as often in the news of
the day as he once did, but that does
not mean that he is not taking a large
hand in the great matters of business
and .politics, reports Harper's Week
ly, He began life as a brakeman oa
the Baltimore and Ohio railroad, and
got his start. Then, when he had
enough money to branch out, he
bought 18,000 acres of West Virginia
wilderness for a few cents an acre.
Extensive coal denosits were found
How the Census Was Taken.
The last census in the United States
was taken with the aid of 311 tabu
lating machines, and 74 adding ma
chines.
Value of the Fmerald.
An emerald of grains weight is
worth 5 but one five times as big
will fetch, not 25. but 100.
Ancient Custom Still Holds.
Ceres games, instituted in 1814 to
celebrate the return of the Ceres men
from Bannockburn, were celebrated
recently in Fifeshlre, Scotland.
German Socialist! Press.
The Socialist press of Germany
numbers 140 publications, fifty-two
being dailies.
New Cure for Drunkenness.
The latest cure for drunkenness la
DUTIES OF "MY" DOCTOR.
Physicians of Millionaires Must B
Up to Date.
Such a man as Rockefeller or Mor
pan is a life study for a physician,
and the man who can keep in perfect
order a human machine of vast im
portance in the community is worthy
of Schwabian compensation. The
big insurance companies are willing
to employ a physician at $100,000 a
year to keep either of the gentlemen
mentioned alive ten years longer.
"My" doctor in such a case must
know what medicine lo prescribe
whenever Morgan or*"1
Rockefeller
sneezes, frowns, swears, limps,
groans, growls, thunders, kicks over
the waste basket, smokes too many
cigars drinks too much water, eats
too heartily of corned Jjeef and cab
bage, talks too much to bis Bible
-class, charges too small a commis
sion for promoting a trust or reor
ganizing a railroad, telegraphs sena
tors to hold up anti-trust legislation,
or commit, any other little indiscre
tion that billionaire flesh is heir to.
He must be familiar with the slight,
est symptom and ready with his dose.
New York Press.
FOG AS A BEAUTIFIER.
New York Society Woman Divulges
Mrs. Langtry's Secret.
Mrs. Langtry attended a reception
In New York last week and roused
much envy among fashionables who
were present because of her beautiful
complexion, which is really a marvel.
Subsequently a rather faded beauty
exclaimed: "How on earth does she do
It? Why, she's 50 if she's a minute."
Another grande dame, who spoke as
though she knew, gave this explana
tion: "It's Jersey, her birthplace. You
know Mrs. Langtry spends six or eight
weeks every season ov ber farm there.
She wears a short skirt and thick
bootssometimes no boots at all
goes about in a sunbonnet and Uvea
like a farm gfrl. The fog of the island
Goes the -e=t
Platinum a Valuable Mineral.
Platinum, which is indispensable In
some instruments of precision, and is
useful in the arts particularly, be
cause when imbedded in glass It does
not crack it by unequal expansion, is
still much more valuable than gold.
Nine-tenths of the world's platinum
(about 8,300 pounds) comes from the
Ural mountains, which enables Russia
to control the price.
FENCING GOOD FOR WOMEN.
Exercise That Will Impart Grace and
Physical Strength.
Those who have seen women /ho
are expert fencers recognize th/t it
is an extremely graceful amusement.
Many ladies are taking fenciug les
sons.
Strength of leg -is necessary, as
well as of wrist, and much activity.
But it ia a most admirable exercise.
Improving the figure and developing
the muscles, and is worthy to be
made an art.
It is not only physical strength that
is required for this amusement, bu*
keenness of the eye and dexterity of
the wrist, and these are quite woman-
"&. Quickness oi inception and ac
W.on are necessary.
Brain and Mental Activity.
Much the larger part of a brain is
composed of white matterthat is,
of nerve fiberswhich has nothing
whatever to do with real brain work
and which only carries messages.
Again if research is to be trusted, it
is only the brain cells of very lim
ited (probably the frontal) region
which have to do with the highest
mental operations. When, therefore,
we talk about the size of the head
and brain and the weight of the bralP
A Pointer for Women.
Queen Alexandra's laces, linens and
silks are perfumed by a method which
almost any woman can copy. The
drawers in which they are kept are
lined with white paper, strewn with
rose petals. On this is placed a layer
of the fabrics to be scented, over that
a layer of rose leaves, aid so on in
alternation until the drawer is filled,
at the end of twenty-four hours every*
thing in the drawer will have a deli
eate perfume that will cling to it for
& lone tlrha.
Against Duty on Works of Art.
J. Pierpont Morgan, Chas. T. Yerkes
end other wealthy men have formed
an association the object of which is
to secure a repeal of the tariff duty on
paintings and works of art imported
Into this country. An appeal is to be
made to President Roosevelt and in
dividual members of Congress will be
asked to use their Influence to have
the law changed. Mr. Morgan has
more than $1,000,000 worth of palnt
lngs stored in London, Paris and Ber
lin. Yerkes has paintings to the value
of $250,000 in his London apartments,
and says he will not bring them here
until the duty is taken off.
Milky Sea Is a Puz2le.
The milky sea, as it is known to
mariners, Is not yet fully understood.
It seems to be most common in the
tropical waters of the Indian ocean,
and is described as weird, ghastly and
awe-inspiring, and as giving the ob
server on shipboard the sensation of
passing through a sort of luminous
fog in which sea and sky seem to join
and all sense of distance is lost. The
phenomenon is probably due to some
form of phosphorescence.
wecKjace Awaits an owner.
A strange story is told about a dia
mond necklace whic
The New Chinese Minister.
Rev. William E. Griffls corrects a
I published statement that Sir Chen
tung Liang Cheng, the new Chinese
minister, is a graduate of Yale. He
merely studied there, being one of
120 students brought to this country
by Yung Wing. The minister ex
I plains that the first part of his name,
I Chentung, corresponds to the Ameri
can John. The middle part, his fam
ily name, is pronounced Leeang. His
title, about which there has been a
good deal of talk, was bestowed by
the British government after the au
thorities of his own country had con
sented that he accent it
Cure for Smallpox.
A subscriber requests the publics*
Hon Of the following: "I am willing
to risk my reputation as a public
man," wrote Edward Hines to the
Liverpool Mercury, "if the worst cast
of smallpox cannot be cured In three
days, simply by the use of cream of
tartar. One ounce of cream of tar
tar dissolved at intervals when cold
is a certain, never-failing remedy. It
has cured thousands, never leaves a
mark, never causes blindness and
avoids tedious lingering."Canton
aaturdav Roller.
Cures Diseases of Plants.
By his method of feeling through
the stems instead of the roots S. A.
Mokrsezki, the Russian entomologist,
believes that trees and plants can be
cured of disease and greatly stimulat
ed in growth. His special apparatus
is intended to introduce salts of iron
either solid or in solutioninto
apple and pear trees, and he has used
it for applying chemical treatment to
800 fruit trees on the southern shore
of the Crimea. The weak and dis
eased condition of the trees was
remedied, while an unusual develop
ment followed.
Hotel Savoy's Immense Mirror.
The Hotel Savoy in New York
plumes itself upon the possession of
the largest mirror in th world. Only
two steamships of the oceanone of
them the Friesland, in which it came
have room in their holds to stow
away such a large package. It is a
iittle mora than thirteen feet square
anu is nearly half an inch thick. To
get this perfect plate five different
glasses had to be cast. It was made
at the St. Gabian glass-works in Paris.
Immense Area Planted to Corn.
The land devoted to corn in the
United States exceeds in area the
whole of the British isles, together
with Holland and Belgium.
Derivation of the Word "Gin."
The word "gin" is not derived from
Geneva, but from "genievre," the
French word for juniper.
to
to
to to to
was found at one
of the English cou balls some years
ago. One of the late queen's ladies
in-waiting picked up a diamond neck
lac* from the floor. -A ladv fam
WE
to to to to to to
to to to
Daily Pioneer Want Ads, One Cent a Word
Lakeside Bakery
MAGEAU BROS., Props.
Choice Candies, Fruits J}{
to and Confections in Stock jv
to (t
have recently purchased the bakery and confection
ery business which was formerly part of the estate
of the late Mrs. A. E.Milne. The building will be remod-
eled and thoroughly renovated. We handle the celebrated
Ives Ice Cream
110 East Third Street. Bemidji, Minn.
TW O DOLLARS A PAIR
OAA pair of men's shoes in vici,
hA3\j box calf, cordovan and some
patent leather. These are manufac
turers samples and mostly medium
sizes they are worth up 4|*0 A A
to $3.50 a pair, now at pfa.VV
The Daylight Store.
.MUfflflG.1
Decorating Floor Finishing.
Granite Floor Finish
WALL PAPER and PAINTS
4 TELEPHONE 20
4| Office* Opp. City Boat House,
**J'V
ri
I
I
G. JONES I
louse
IFW
V^l
W W
f^^WWVWSA^VSA^WS
Livery Stable
A. M. BAGLEV
SUCCESSOR TO J. J. JINKINSON
New Carriages
and Good Horses
New and Second Hand
Carriages For Sale
BEMIDJI MINN.
Jay Reynolds
Attorney-at-Law.
Office: Over Lumbermens Bank
(f\
J3
CPE CIAT
FOR
THIS
WEEK

xml | txt