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The daily pioneer. [volume] (Bemidji, Beltrami Co., Minn.) 1903-1904, July 16, 1903, Image 1

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VOLUME 1. NUMBER 74.
REMARKABLE
RALLY OfPOPE
ARISES FROM HIS BED AND RE-
CEIVES FOUR CARDINALS
STANDING.
TRANSACTS PRIVATE BUSINESS
HOWEVER, ACCORDING TO DOC-
TORS, PONTIFF MAY DIE AT
ANY MOMENT.
STEADILY LOSING HIS STRENCTH
RALLY CAME AFTER PONTIFF
HAD SUFFERED SPELLS OF
DELIRIUM.
Rome, July 16, 6:50 a. m. While
the pope passed a-fairly quiet night he
had some moments of delirium. The
rumor of the pontiff's death was twice
circulated during the night, but was
promptly denied. The depression of
his vital forces continues.
Rome, July 16, 1:20 a. m.Another
remarkable rally in Pope Leo's con
dition occurred yesterday afternoon
after a morning in the course of which
his holiness suffered spells of delirium
and at times his strength sank to the
lowest ebb, and now he lies in no
worse condition than he was on Mon
day evening, except for the steady
aiminution of his strength. Mgr. Bis
leti, master of the chamber, visited
the sick room just after midnight, and
on emerging stated that the pontiff's
condition was unchanged. A Little
later the pope fell into a sleep which
it has just been announced Is fairly
tranquil, although the patient's respir
ation is troublesome.
Yesterday's rally was character
istically opposed to every medical
theory and consisted In
Getting Out of Bed,
on which two hours previously the
pope himself had made all prepara
tions for death. Unsatisfied with this
exhibition of vitality, he transacted
private business and received four
cardinals, with whom he talked in an
animated way. In fact, Pope Leo's
record for yesterday, little of which
appeared in last night's official bulle
tin, would be incredible if it were not
confirmed by the doctors and cardinals
present in the sick chamber. None
seem more perplexed than the doctors
themselves. Dr. Lapponi said frankly:
"I cannot imagin how the pope
manages to keep alive."
According to the physicians, the
pontiff may die at any moment, even
in the middle of one of those extra
ordinary intervals when his mind and
body present a
Sound Appearance.
All those around the patient have
long since ceased to hold definite
opinions regarding the duration of the
pontiff's existence. The slow but pro
gressive dimunition of the strength of
the august patient foTtells^ the ap
proaching end of the struggle with
death, but the doctors will not ven
ture to predict how near the end is.
Constant relapses, they say, such, as
created alarm early yesterday, are
gradually wearing down the pope's
constitution which seems immune
from any specific disease. As day
succeeds day it becomes pathological
ly clearer that it is a case of a very
old man dying because he has lived
his allotted time.
The pope himself yesterday after
noon ordered the four cardinals to be
admitted and
Received Them Standing.
He, who is supposed to be at the point
of death, sayin: "Please be seated."
He recounted the impressive cere
mony of the morning when he re
ceived the benediction of the Fran
cescan order. The cardinals informed
him of the world-wide prayers for his
life. Pope Leo. answered that he was
much gratified, but that he was ready
for his final departure, concluding by
saying: "God's will be 'done."
Even more striking was the pope's
interview with his secretary, Mgr.
Angeli. His holiness sent for him,
saying that he wished to see certain
papers, which the secretary brought.
Then after a short explanation Mgr.
Angeli wished to get the pope's de
cision on the matter, but Pope Leo
said:
"Well, well, not to-day. We will do
that some other time."
Col. Cressey's New Job.
Sioux Falls, S. D., July. 16.Col. E.
T\ Cressey of this city, who is well
-wn throughout South Dakota and
adjcini-ns: states, upon the personal re
quest of Supt S. E. Young of the state
reform school at Plankinton, has ac
cepted the position of superintendent
of the printing department of the in
stitution
Subscribe for The Pioneer,
NAVAL VISIT IS ENDED.
Admiral Cotton Enthusiastic Over Re
ception in England.
Portsmouth, Eng., July 16. With
the reception given on board Rear
Admiral Cotton's flagship Kearsarge
yesterdav afternoon the official visit
of the American squadron to England
terminated. The royal yacht Victoria
and Albert will leave Portsmouth
harbor to-day and receive the salutes
of the warships as they steam out.
On Friday, when outside Spithead. Ad
miral Cotton will transfer his flag to
the Chicago and proceed with the San
Francisco and Machias to Lisbon,
while the Kearsarge will begin her
speed trial across the Atlantic.
"Our reception in England has been
morst cordial and enthusiastic," said
Rear Admiral Cotton. "Nothing could
exceed the courtesy extended to us on
all sides, from the king and prince of
Wales, the officials of the government
and officers of the army and navy to
the people of London and Portsmouth
I have no doubt that the. result Of the
visit of the American squadron will
prove beneficial in the extreme, and
that it will tend to strengthen the
cordial relations which have long ex
isted between the two countries."
MAY SUCCEED SECRETARY ROOT.
Gen. Oliver May Step Into His Shoes
When He Retires.
Washington, July 16. It seems to
he a general understanding among of
ficials of the war department who
ought to know that the name of Rob
ert Shaw Oliver, who has just been
appointed assistant secretary of war,
will be favorably considered for secre
tary of war when Secretary Root re
tires from the cabinet. It has been
known for some time that on the com
pletion of certain important matters
which Secretary Root has in hand he
Intends to return to New York to re
sume the practice of law. Just when
this might happen is and has been
very indefinite. Secretary Root sails
for England the last of the month to
take his place as chairman of the
American commission on the Alaskan
boundary commission. He will con
tinue as secretary of war during his
stay abroad.
M'CUE IS INSANE.
Bigamous Lieutenant Is on His Way
to a Lunatic Asylum.
Washington, July 16. Gen. Corbin
has approved the recommendation of
Gen. Bates in the case of Lieut. Will
iam McCue, First infantry, and that of
ficer is now on his way to St. Eliza
beth's hospital for the insane in this
city. The papers in the case have
been received at the war department
and show that surgeons who examined
McCue pronounce him insane. Among
the papers is one tendering his resig
nation as an officer while in the Philip
pines, and another, written about the
same time, saying that he was insane.
His letter describes his life in the in
terior of Samar, and says that exis
tance there makes men insane. Mc
Cue is the officer who married in San
Francisco, although having a wife i
Cincinnati.
GEN. MILES' RECORD RIDE.
Travels Ninety Miles in Nine Hours
and Ten Minutes.
El Reno, Okla.. July 16.Lieut. Gen.
Nelson A. Miles completed a horse
back ride from Fort Sill, Ind. T., to
Fort Reno, Okla., a distance 6f ninety
miles, in nine hours and ten minutes.
The first thirty-five miles were made
in record time, the distance being
covered in two hours and twenty-five
minutes. Upon completing the trip
Gen. Miles showed no signs of fatigue,
and forty minutes after his arrival at
Fort Pi.eno, reviewed the troops sta
tioned at that post. The ride was
taken, it is said, to demonstrate that
Gen. Miles at the age of retirement is
still a sturdy man.
KILLED BY TORNADO.
One Life Lost and Growing Crops Com
pletejy Destroyed.
Cosead, Neb., July 16.A tornado
passed eight miles north of here yes
terday afternoon, killing one person
and injuring three others. The storm
passed from northwest to southeast
for a distance of ten miles, devastating
a strip of country three miles wide,
destroying almost every house and
barn in its course. The loss is esti
mated at $100.00o. The growing crops
were completely destroyed in the
area over which the tornado passed.
Theater Girls Hurt.
Paris. July lfi.A serious accident
occurred at the Folies theater. In the
final scene there is an imitation of a
cascade, down whieh apparenv.lv glide
a number of girls, who are really at
tached by the waist to a moving sheet.
Last night the cord broke and the
sheet came down to the stage with a
rush. Thirteen of the girls were bad
ly hurt, and eight w?r taken to the
hospital.
Mills Partly Destroyed.
Oregon City. Or., July 10.Fire last
night destroyed a portion of the Ore
gon City Manufaeturing company's
woolen mills, the loss on which is
about $40,000.
Subscribe for the Pioneer. Subscribe for The Pioneer.
HAS JEW reimo
MUCH DISCUSSED DOCUMENT IS
HANDED TO PRESIDENT AT
OYSTER BAY.
MA NO E SENT O RUSSIA
GIVE THE CZAR A CHANCE TO
SAY WHETHER OR NOT HE
WOULD RECEIVE IT.
SHOWS CONFIDENCE I N TH E CZAR
ASKED TO APPOINT ARBITRA-
TORS TO PASS ON VEN-
EZUELAN QUESTION.
Oyster Bay, L. I., July 16.An im
portant conference was held at Saga
more Hill yesterday between the pres
ident and representative Jewish citi
zens from the Society of B'nai B'rith
regarding the petition to the Russian
government on the Kishinef outrages.
The result of the conference has not
been disclosed yet, but a strong Inti
mation is given that the petition may
not be forwarded to the Russian gov
ernment. The desire of both the pres
ident and Secretary Hay is that the
Kishinef Incident should be closed as
soon as possible, as further delay in
its consideration might prove embar
rassing to this government in other
diplomatic negotiations with Russia.
Inasmuch as the Russian govern
ment has indicated by the adoption of
Severe Measures
a genuine disposition to punish ade
quately the perpetrators of the Kish
inef murders, and in addition, those
who instigated them, it is a problem
for the president and Secretary Hay
to solve whether representations con
cerning the incident now are desira
ble.
It is suggested that the whole mat
ter may be resolved into a brief state
ment through diplomatic channels to
the Russian foreign office, that such a
petition is in the hands of the United
States, thus leaving It to Russia to say
whether it would or would not receive
the document If it were presented.
This would close the incident without
subjecting the United States' relations
with Russia to a strain and would be
quite as effective as the actual pre
sentation of the petition.
UP TO THE CZAR.
Secretary Hay Invites Him to Name
Venezuelan Commissioners.
Washington, July 16. Secretary
Hay has invited the czar of Russia to
name and ap /Oint from the members
of the permanent court of The Hague
three arbitrators to constitute the tri
bunal which is to determine and set
tle the questions submitted to it under
the Venezuelan claims treaty.
Confidence in Czar.
In asking the czar to name the arbi
trators this government has the ut
most confidence that the Russian sov
ereign will not allow his judgment to
be biased by the Kishinef petition in
cident and the allegation of Russian
unfriendliness toward the United
States in the Manchurian negotiations
which was contained in the official
statement of July 1, understood to
have been prepared at Oyster Bay.
A somewhat hopeful feeling pre
vails here that the czar, in responding
to the request of the United States to
name The Hague arbitrators, may find
occasion to bring up the Kishinef mat
ter and through friendly interchange
secure an understanding that will ob
viate the necessity of any attempt by
the United States to place the Kish
inef petition before the Russian gov
ernment. This would restore the rela
tions of the two nations to their form
er states of cordiality.
It has been surmised also that the
czar might find ThTTHague~matter the
occasion of making an entirely satis
factory communication to the United
States in regard to the Manchurian
"open door" negotiations.
HEAD-ON COLLISION.
Casualties Result From Crash of
Trains in Missouri.
Des Moines, Iowa, July 16.A head
on collision on the Chicago Great
Western near Savannah, Mo., early
yesterday resulted in the death of
Freman Stewart of Des Moines and
the Injury of several others. The
south-bound passenger train crashed
into a freight train at full speed.
Engineer Brownfield and Fireman
Tom Howard were seriously injured.
Brownflpld and Stewart constituted
the engine crew of the passengei
train. Howard was on the freight
train. Over twenty passengers were
injured, some of them seriously, but
all will recover. The wreck was due
to an accident which delayed the pas
senger train and prevented it from
reaching Schuster, where the two
trains were to pass, on tim.
THE DAILY PIONEER.
BEMIDJI, MINNESOTA, THURSDAY, JULY 16, 1J902
it
1 ^**^**VVWV*VVVV*SAi**VSAJ*SAV*
and Retail
i***?******^^^
TONNAGE IS GROWING.
Fair Taxation Brings New Business to
the Port of Duluth.
Duluth, July 16. Collector L. M.
Willcuts has just issued his annual
report on vessel tonnage enrolled at
the port of Duluth. which now leads
all other lake ports in this resuect.
There is a total of 337 boats enrolled
here and paying taxes here. They
have an aggregate gross tonnage of
493,620 gross tons. This is a gain of
forty vessels and about 90,000 gross
tons for the year. Duluth Is the port
of hail for a majority of the largest
and best boats on the lake. The fact
that all this1
tonnage is enrolled hero
is due to the rate of taxation and is
practically all new business sine*
1897. Before that only a few til*
boats were enrolled here.
AFFRAY WITH PITCHFORKS.
Respected Farmer Is Charged With
Stabbing a Young Man.
Winona, Alinm, July 16. Word
comes from Fountain City that Julius
Walski is lying in a critical condition
and that Jacob Senn, an old and re
spected farmer and insurance man of
that vicinity, is under bonds in the
sum of $1,000, charged with stabbing
the young man with a pitchfork. The
trouble arose over a dispute about
wages. Welskl had been working for
Senn, but was discharged. The young
man is alleged to have asked wages
for July 3 and 4. days on which he did
not work. Senn refused. Walski
then attacked him from behind, it 18
said, with a fork. Senn saw him in
time, and, picking up a similar instru
ment, used it In self-defense.
MGR. KATZER WORSE.
Condition of the Archbishop of Mil
waukee Becomes Serious.
Fond du Lac, Wis., July 16.A de
cided change for the worse is report
ed in the condition of Arcjibishop
Kat/.er. He passed an uneasy night,
sleeping very little, and when he arose
he did not seem at all refreshed* and
was not disposed to leave his room ex
cept to attend to his devotions. Alarm
is felt in the sanitarium of St. Agnes,
where he is staying. The archbishop
has lost flesh in the past week and hlH
complexion is sallow. Prayers are be
ing offered at the altars in the Roman
Catholic churches for the recovery of
the archbishop. Archbishop Katzer is
suffering with a complication of kid
ney and liver diseases.
NARROWLY ESCAPED ROASTING.
Man Is Accidentally Shut in a Coka
Oven.
Marinette. Wis., July K.Throug
the accidental closing of a sheet iron
door in a new coke oven O. P. Chat
flold. who was inside the oven, nar
rowly escaped being roasted to death.
With no one to help him Mr. Chatfield
realized that he must get out Immedi
ately or hp would soon be baked to a
crisp. With the aid of an iron bar he
managed after a superhuman effort to
lift the door about a foot and escape
His face and hands were badly blis
tered from the intense heat.
OUSTER FOR ALDERMEN.
Butte's Mayor Says That They Are
Not Taxpayers.
Butte, Mont., July 'Hi.Mayor Mul
lins yesterday began quo warranto
proeefdings to oust five aldermen,
James Doull, A. G. Siebalt, G. Galla
gher, M. Ryan and P. Lally from
offire on the ground that they were
not at the time they were elected, cod
are not now, taxpaying freeholders.
Stripped by Hail.
Fargo. N. D., July 16. A strip of
country from ten to fifteen miles long
and from three to five miles wide in
the western part of this county, was
hit by hail. Several farmers wen
struck. The heaviest losers were
Moug Brothers, Representative
inson. Henry Martin, B. McDc
Ben Livormore and Fred Hibbard
others The section hit was just
of Ayr station and about north 'i
Buffalo.
FRED C. SMYTH, President TH0S. P. SMYTH, See.-Treas. D. SMYTH, Manager
BEMIDJI MERCANTILE CO
Opposite the Old Court House
Groceries, Flour, Hay and Grain
2 1 5
MM !S OUTWITTED
QUICK WIT OF A DEPUTY SHER-
IFF SAVES NEGRO FROM
LYNCHING.
SMUGGLED OfF TO ANOTHtR JAIL
FARMERS WERE TERRIBLY EX-
CITED AND BENT ON HAVING
VENGEANCE.
FIEND ASSAULTED A LITTLE GIRL
NEGRO, AFTER BEING CAPTURED,
CONFESSES HIS AWFUL
DEED.
Albany, N. Y., July 16.The quick
wit of a deputy sheriff at Ooxsackle
yesterday afternoon prevented the
lynching of James LitUo, a nineteen
year-old negro hailing from Summer
hurst, N. J., who early yesterday
morning, near New Baltimore, crim
inally assaulted Emma Cole, aged
eleven years, daughter of Joseph Cole,
a farmer living one mile back of New
Baltimore. The negro escaped after
threatening the child with death. Two
and Farmers.
BEMIDJI
Till' NEW TOWN OF
KELLIHE
situated as it is, at the head [jul'ifiead Lake, and
at the terminus of the Bullhead branch of the M. A
I. railway, and being in the heart of the timber di
tnct where logging will bo carried extensively
for the next fifteen year-, l. bound to be a thriving
town in a very short time. The soil in thia vioin4t\
is loam with clay subsoil, showing excellent |.-MI~-
neeta in regard to agrlclirfural purpose's. The
O'Kelliher Mercantile Co.
of Blackduck
will rniiJil a large t. i ai store, to Supply loggers
THE voting towns- in Northern Minrctsota are fam
ous for their rapid growth, and evefyriffiffe goes
to show that KELLIHER will be one of the busiest
logging centers in this district.
For inJornjatioii regarding prices of lots, other general
information, write or rail tt the
Crookston Lumber Company
LOGGING DEPARTMENT
TEN CENTS PER WEEK
**^**^AA'VV^A/^AA***VVV*VVVV^*'WV*
We Sell Large
Quantities and
Our Goods Are
Always Freish
vww^
other c-hildnm liac gTven the aia.m
and Mr. Cole and neighbors met the
child coming borne, and at ones- or-
ganized a party to scour the woods.
A description of the negro was sent
to near-by towns, and an hoar later he
was captured on the railroad track
near Coxsackte by Roy Cutler. Ho
confessed the assault and was locked
up. In the meantime news of the cap
ture reached New Baltimore and a
mob of 150
Enraged Farmers
started for Coxsackie, augmented by
a large number of striking Coxsackle
molders and river men, all frankly
vowing their intention to lynch the
negro.
Deputy Sheriff Sumner Van Loon,
realizing that the cyming of darkness
would mean the brewing of the flimsy
local lock-up and/fhe violent death of
his prisoner, smuggled the negro out
and took him down the river on the
boat to Catskill, where there Is a well
built jail.
The Cole child is seriously injured,
but may recover. Her father and tho
neighboring farmers are In a terrible
state of excitement, and but for the
deputy's quick action would certainly
have lynched tho negro.
The negro, Little. Hays he has been
living in Albany until Monday, when
he started to walk to his home In New
Jersey. His confsession fully corrob
orates the story told by the child.
Suicide at Marshalltown.
Marshalltown, Iowa, July 1C.
James Carroll, a laborer, committed
suicide last evening. He leaves a wife
and nine children.
MINN

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