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The daily pioneer. [volume] (Bemidji, Beltrami Co., Minn.) 1903-1904, July 17, 1903, Image 1

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VOLUME 1. NUMBER 75.
W HOPE OR
LEO'S RECOVERY
PHYSICAL ENERGY INDISPENSA-
BLE FOR RECOVERY IS
LACKING.
1 MAZZONI MAKES A STATEMENT
ALL THAT SCIENCE CAN DO IS TO
PROLONG LIFE AS LONG AS
POSSIBLE.
AWFUL RAVAGES OE DSSEASE
POPE'S FEATURES HAVE TAKEN
ON FIXED RIGIDITY OF
DEATH.
Rome, July 17, 3:05 a. At the
beginning of the second part of the
night the pope was somewhat restless
and Dr. Lapponi tried to assist the
patient with stimulants and nourish
ment.
Rome, July 17.Dr. Mazzoni, in re
ply to the question: "Can the pope re
cover last night gave the following
signed statement
"At the present moment the disease
of his holiness has lost its character
of absolute gravity which it had at its
''acute period. It might be considered
to have entered the period of a pos
sible solution. This might occur in a
man of strong fiber and young, but it
is impossible to entertain such a
hope in the case of a man in his nine
ty-fourth year. With him the physical
energy absolutely indispensable for
recovery is lacking. Pope Leo's or
ganism is perfect and as such main
tains itself after ninety-three years of
never interrupted work, but his mo
tor force is no longer sufficient for the
complex functions essential to life. In
other words, the ninety-three years of
Pope Leo XIII. bring him into that
category of extraordinary longevity
when life is
Destined to Flicker Out
independent of the action of any
jiathological complication. The'only
Service that science and affection can
render is that of struggling to have
this precious existence preserved to us
as long as possible."
One of the doctors in attendance on
the pontiff gave the Associated Press
correspondent a graphic but horrible
word picture of Pope Leo as he ap
pears to-day. The smile which lighted
up the pontiffs face even in extreme
age has disappeared, probably for
ever. The skin is drawn tightly over
the bony framework of his face, leav
ing the once bright eyes staring dimly
from the deeply sunken sockets. A
grayish pallor overspreads his counte
nance, but the most noticeable ravage
wrought by his present disease is the
dropping of the lower jaw, which has
made the pope's features take on the
fixed rigidity of death.
Throughout the day the precincts of
the Vatican were comparatively quiet
and the immediate vicinity of the sick
room showed none of the evidences of
agitation and alarm so apparent Tues
day. In marked contrast to previous
days the patient was kept in
Almost Absolute Seclusion,
only one person besides the physicians
in immediate attendance gaining ad
mission. This one was Mgr. Pifferi.
the pope's confessor.
During the day the pope took a
slight amount of nourishment.
Through the morning he was quite
restless, shifting uneasily on his bed
and complaining of being unable to se
cure an easy position. Later he be
came drowsy and during the afternoon
had some sleep.
The moderate tone of the bulletin
which followed the evening visit of the
doctors gave an assurance that the
patient's condition was practically un
changed, while the expression that the
depression ol his strength had not in
creased afforded a slight note of relief.
His holiness complained of a slight
uneasiness in the chest, but that he
hsa not yet completely given up hope
was indicated by his remark that he
expected the oppression of his chest
to pass off in a few days.
ONLY THREE CASES
Of Yellow Fever Have Entered Ha
vana Harbor This Season.
Havana, July 17D- P-rna. the act
ing chief of the san: department,
announces that three cases of
yellow fever ha' entered Havana
barb this year. Of the three, all of
whom came from Mexico, one died and
another was discharged yesterday as
cured. The remaining^victim came to
Havana from Progreso by represent
ing himself as a passenger who had
previously registered as F~ immune.
Subscribe for Thp Pinneer.
THE DAILY
DEMORALIZATION ON CHANGE.
One of the Most Disastrous Days in
Wall Street Since Panic of 1901.
New York, July 17.Demoralization
ruled iff the stock market yesterday,
maiing it up to the time of the clcr*ng
rally one of the most disastrous days
since tbe memorable panic of May 9,
1901. New low records for the year
were made in the trading on a heavy
volume of business. Some of the de
clines in high grade investment stocks
for _the day ran all the way from 4 to
'2(TpointS In the early dealings there
was a rush to sell. Prices dropped
sharply and in some cases precipi
tately with active stocks down 2 and 3
points each, and with an extreme
break of ovtr 5(1 points reported in St.
Louis & San Francisco, Chicago &
Eastern Illinois certificates. The de
cline was especially noteworthy, how
ever, in such stocks as St. Paul. New
York Central. Union. Pacific. Canadian
Pacific, Missouri ""Pacific. United
States Steel and General Electric. A
distinctly unfavorable impression was
created by the announcement of the
issue of short-time notes by the Union
Pacific to the amount of $10,000,000
also smaller loans by several other
railroad companies. Following the
borrowing by the Burlington, the ac
tion of the Union Pacific and other
roads in going into the market for
money naturally affords ground for
uneasiness in speculative circles, par
ticularly as the companies are forced
to pay stiff rates for their accommoda
tions. It is believed that the Union
Pacific announcement was an impor
tant factor in the demoralization and
that the new demands of the various
railroads for money were responsible
for the liquidation of many stock
market accounts at serious losses.
SPORT AT OYSTER BAY.
Mr. Roosevelt and Family Witness a
Boat Race.
Oyster Bay, N. Y., July 17.Presi-
dent and Mrs. Roosevelt, together with
Secretary Shaw and a large party of
relatives and friends yesterday after
noon from the decks of the naval
yacht Sylph saw a boat race on Oyster
bay. The contestants were four crews
of three men each selected from the
enlisted men of the Sylph. The pres
ident added a substantial zest to the
contest by offering a purse of $35, $25
of which should go to the winning
crew and $10 to the second crew.
President Roosevelt stood in the ex
treme bow of the Sylph and intently
watched, every yard of the race
through glasses. Theodore fired the
starting pistol and Kermit pulled the
trigger at the finish.
VICTIMS OF TETANUS.
One Hundred and Fifty Children Lost
Through th Deadly Toy Pistol.
Chicago, July 17. Twenty-five
deaths from lockjaw, due to Fourth of
July accidents, were reported in vari
ous parts of the country Tuesday and
at least a dozen yesterday, increasing
the total dead to about 150. From
every part of the United States tele
grams have been bringing the news of
more fatalities resulting from the
reckless use of gunpowder in cele
brating the holiday. In most cases
the victims were young people, and in
nearly all the use of the deadly toy
pistol and blank cartridges was re
sponsible. The number injured on the
Fourth in the United States was 3,665.
Since then a number of these have
succumbed to tetanus.
ONE MAN SHOT.
Regular Weekly Hold-Up Occurs on
the Portland Electric Line.
Portland, Or., July 17.An electric
car was held up here last night by
seven highwaymen, who shot one man
and robbed the forty passengers of
their valuables. Immediately on
hoarding the ear the robbers shot.
and dangerouslv wounded Frederick
Day, a passenger, after he had com
plied wiU their demand of "hands up,"
and then rifled his pockets. 0?:e of
their number then went Eh~f.bugri the
i car while the others stood guard. It
I is estimated that they secured about
300 in money besides much i iwelry.
SUPPORT OF PLURAL WIVES.
Court Holds There Is a Morel but No
Leaal Obligation to Do So.
Salt Lake. Utah. July 17.Accord-
ing to a decision of the state supreme
court a man is under mora' but not
legal obligations to support Ins plural
wives and educate his children by
such unions. The decision was ren
dered on an appeal from the Utah
county district court of a suit for
maintenance brought by MaryiCaro
line Riddle, a plural wife of Isaac Rid
dle.
TIME TO REPENT.
St. Louis Boodier Given Seven Years
in the Pen.
St. Louis. July 17.The jury in the
case of Julius Lehman, former mem
ber of the house of delegates, charged
with bribery in connection with the
passage of tbe city lighting bill, re
turned a verdict of guilty. His pun
ishment was fixed at seven years in
the penitentiary, the longest term yet
inflicted in any of the boodle cases.
Subscribe for the Pioneer.
POLICE OPEN EIRE
DESPERATE FIGHT BETWEEN
POLICE AND STRIKERS IN
CHICAGO.
SHOWERED THEM WITH BRICKS
HOWLING MOB HARASSES THE
POLICE AND NON-UNION
TEAMSTERS.
A DOZEN HEADS ARE BROKEN
POLICE WIELD CLUBS AND FISTS
VIGOROUSLY AND MOB
SCATTERS.
Chicago, July 17.Desperate fight
ing between tbe police and the strik
ers of the Kellogg Switchboard com
pany took place yesterday afternoon
and evening, when the company at
tempted to send freight to some of the
railroad depots. In one instance the
police opened fire with revolvers, and,
although the fusilade continued sev
eral minutes, nobody was injured.
Later there was a fight in which no
revolvers were used and the police
beat down a number of men, some of
whom were left in the street until
their friends came back to pick them
up.
The first fight occurred when a
truck loaded with freight escorted by
police bound for the Burlington depot
was passing an unfinished building at
the corner of Harrison and Peoria
streets. A howling mob of a thousand
men and boys was following close
upon the police and pelting them
With Stones and Sticks.
Teamsters who sympathized with
the strikers managed to get their wag
ons in the way of the Kellogg com
pany's wagon as it reached Peoria
street and occasioned a blockade.
The police were endeavoring to clear
the street when the workmen on the
unfinished building showered them
with bricks. The officers at once
drew their revolvers and fired at the
workmen, who hastily fled to the in
terior of the builaing. The police
kept up their fire through the windows
and drove nearly all the workmen
from the place.
The route to the depot was then
taken up, and although there w'ere
were several blockades, the wagon
reached the depot and delivered the
goods.
The second fight occurred when the
police were escorting a wagon load of
freight to the warehouse of the Ter
minal Transfer company at Oj.,den av
enue and TwelftL street. A mob,
fully 3,000 strong, followed this wagon,
and, although the police were outnum
bered 100 to 1, they took the wagon
safely to the depot. The
Mob Had Greatly Increased
by the time the wagon was ready to
make the return trip, and for half a
mile pursued the police, applying to
them all sorts of epithets and pelting
them with sticks and stones, without,
however, injuring any person serious
ly: The climax came at Congress
street and Ogden avenue, when a
i private watchman who had no parfjc
I ular call to mix in the trouble on
I either side, fired at one of the mob.
i The shot went wild, but it inflamed
the mob to' the highest degree, and
with shouts and yells they charged
down the police. The latter were
waiting for the crowd, and when it ar
rived the officers went at it with fists
and clubs. The patrolmen were great
ly outnumbered, but they fough'f well
together and in less than three min
utes every member of the mob who
could use his feet was doing so to the
best ot bis ability. Fully a dozen men
with broken heads w're left lying in
the street where they hfd been
knocked by the clubs of the officers.
The Kellogg company announces
I that it will continue to send out
freight every day, and. the strikers
say that they will use every means to
prevent their doing so.
MRS. BLAINE DEAD.
The Widow of the Famous "Plumed
Knight" Has Passed Away.
Augusta. Me., July 17.Mrs. James
G. Blame died yesterday morning.
She was the widow of the famous
Maine statesman. Death was due to
old age and a general breakdown. She
was nearly seventy-five years old and
has been in failing health three years.
Captain Pays Heavy Fine.
San Francisco, July 17.Capt. Will
iam W. Harts. U. S. A., who came
from the Orient on the transport
Thomas and who failed to declare 153
articles in his baggage subject to cus
toms duty, yesterday paid a fine of
SI,971 to the collector. This money
will be held subject to the decision of
the treasury department, to which
Capt. Harts will appeal to have the
fine remitted.
Subscribe for The Pioneer.
5
1
ORDERS GIVEN FOR CONSTRUC-
TION OF BARRACKS FOR
THE SOLDIERS.
Port Arthur, Manchuria, July 17.
The conference of prominent Russians
has ended and they departed for Mos
cow Tuesday. Most of the visiting of
ficials have gone. The exultation over
Russia's increasing power in Man
churia was the dominant note in the
gathering. The possibility of taking
any backward steps are scoffed at if
mentioned by outsiders. It was ad
mitted that the war possibility was
discussed, but it was denied that that
was the object of the conference. The
evidence of the increase of warlike
preparations since the arrival of Gen.
Kuropatkin, the minister of war, and
of the intention to bring more troops
to Manchuria are abundant.
Orders Are Abundant.
Orders were given to Port Arthur
contractors last week for an immedi
ate supply of building materials for
barracks to accommodate 20,000 sol
diers, to be shipped to liaii.in.
The officials explained ...at Russia's
'opposition to opening the Man.chur.lajS
towns to foreigners was not based
upon opposition to foreigners, whose
trade is desired and who would in due
time "be invited Into the country. But
Russia objected, they explained, to
having consuls accredited to the
Chinese government in towns which
are practically under Russian control,
which would give the subjects of coun
i tries so represented the enjoyment of
extraterritorial rights. They asserted
that such, an arrangement would be
certain to result in great friction, such
as occurred in New Ch'wang*.
I Sounding Russia.
Washington. July 17. The Jewish
[petition laid before the president on
Tuesday by the B'nui li'rith commit
tee has been received here and Secre
tary Hay has communicated by cable
with Mr. Riddle, file American charge
d'affaires at St. Petersburg, respecting
the means to be employed in bringing
it to the attention of the czar. It is
believed that Mr. Riddles instructions
l_aTrr~tTT"TiotifT-th"e"1tTiPsian
BEMIDJI, MINNESOTA, FRIDAY, JULY 17. UW. TEN GENTS PER WEEK.
and Retail
S^VVV^IVVVWVVNIN^VVVVVWVV^A!*^**^^
IS THERE TO STAY
RUSSIA COULDN'T THINK OF
PULLING OUT OF MAN-
CHURIA.
Will TAKE NO BACKWARD STEP
OFFICIALS AT PORT ARTHUR
CONFERENCE SCOFF AT
SUCH AN IDEA.
WARLIKE PREPARATIONS 00 ON
government
of the existence of the petition and
ascertain whether it is willing to re-
ceiVe it. The Jewish committee, it is
stated, is entirely satisfied with the
plans framed bv President Roosevelt
and Secretary Hay for the presentar
i tion of the matter to the Russian gov
ernment. No further announcement
will be made here until Mr. Riddle has
been heard from.
Killed at House Kaislng.
Red Wing. Minn.. July 17.--While
raisinc a building at Frank Roster's
farm near Dennison. Erik Floren was
instantly killed by a falling timber.
He was fifty-six years old.
Lightning Strikes Elevator.
I.aramore, N. D., July 17Lightning
struck the Dowling elevator and de
stroyed it. Only for a heavy rain at
the time another disastrous fire would
have occurred.
Subscribe fox. The Pioneer.
FRED C. SMYTH, President TH0S. P. SMYTH. Sec.-Treas. I). C. SMYTH. Manager
BEMIDJI MERCANTILE CO,
Opposite the Old Court House
Groceries, Flour, Hay and Grain
PROTESTS AGAINST SUITS.
SpecialClauses Inserted in Sioux Falls
Waterworks Contract.
Sioux Falls, S. D., July 17.--The city
council has ratified the contracts
made by the members of the water
commission for the material and lay
ing of the mains for the new munici
pal waterworks system which is to be
constructed in this city. In the con
tracts is a clause providing that In
case the work is stopped at any time
the contractors may be settled with
pro rata for work done. This clause is
a safeguard to protect the city should
any legal action on the part of the
private water company be taken to
prevent the construction of the pro
posed municipal system, thus delaying
the work for an uncertain time.
Postoffice nobbed.
Muscatine, Iowa, July 17.The safe
In the Montezuma postoffice was
blown,, open and $400 and stamps were
stolen.
Will Build Elevator.
Sioux Falls, S. I)., July 17. The
farmers living in the,vicinity of Col
man, have decldgrKo 'erect a fanners'
elevator at p6lman. It was voted to
place the shares at $2f each. Work
will begin soon.
mall Boy Drowns.
Belle Plaine. Minn., Jul yl7.Willie
Nitz, a nine-year-old son of Gustavn
Nitz of this place, was drowned In the
Minnesota river here yesterday. He
was standing on the bank, which
caved. In.
and farmers.
We Sell Large
Quantities and
Our Goods Are
Always Fresh
Ill if XHW TOWN OF
KELLIHE
situated a* it i at the head Bullhead Lake, and
at the terminus ol the Bullhead branch of the M. .v.
I. railway, and being In the heart i the timber dis
trict where logging will be carried extensively
fpr the next fifteen year-, fa bound to be a thriving
town in it very .-hoi' tune. Tbe -oil in this vicinity
is loam with day subsoil showing excellent pros-
pects in regard to agricultural purposes,
O'Kelliher Mercantile Co
of Blackduck
will build a large general store, to supply loggci
nrjEUS fc-QUEg tow I. iii Northern Mini,t sola aie fam
ous for their rapid growth, and everything gp
DO -bow that KKLL1I1F.H will be one of the busiest
logging centers in this district-
Tor information regaiding prices of lots, other general
information, write or call at the
Crookston Lumbe Company
LOGGING DEPARTMENT
BEMIDJI MINN.
LAUNCH CAPSiZ.t-3.
Two Young Ladies Drowned but Their
Escort Escapes.
Davenport, Iowa, July 17. Clara
Licht and Elsie Morey were drowned
by the capsizing of a launch in the
Mississippi river. Four young men
were thrown Into the river from the
overturned boat but saved themselves.
Father Grows Indignant.
Sioux City, Iowa. July 17.Because
the county cleric here issued a mar
riage license for Blanche Doming to
be married to C. T. Harris on July 3
the father of the girl, who Uvea at A"n-
thon, Iowa, has written an indignant
letter to Clerk Conniff, declaring the
girl was only sixteen years of age.
The enraged parent writes: "I don't
think you have any right to tflve a
license to any thief to steal babies
from the cradle. The evidence given
regarding the girl's age was a lie." A
witness swore the girl was eighteen
years of age.
Caught by Sickle.
Fosston, Minn., July 1G.A distress
ing accident occurred near Pople lake,
five miles east of here, whereby
Oscar Swanson, the threc-year*ol
son of Frank Swanson, lost his right
foot and narrowly escaped being lit
erally ground to pieces by a mowing
machine. His leg was amputated at.
the knee.
Free Delivery for Jamestown.
Washington, July 17. The post
master general has ordered the estab
lishment of free delivery postal ser
ies on Sept. 1 at Jamestown, N. D.
TLi

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