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The daily pioneer. [volume] (Bemidji, Beltrami Co., Minn.) 1903-1904, August 12, 1903, Image 1

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T.
VOLUME 1. NUMBER 95.
EXPERIMENT BIG
SUCCESS
Range Man Finds Northern
Minnesota Fine Stock
Raising Country.
RESULTS HE OBTAINED ARE
OF LOCAL INTEREST.
Says That Sheep Thrive Better
Here Than Farther to
the South.
In view of the fact that land in
Beltrami county is just as good
if not better for stock raisin
than that in St. Louis county, th'
following clipping from the Evel
eth Mining News, giving: the ex
perience of one who has tried the
experiment of raising cattle and
sheep should be of interest to
Beltrami county farmers. Below
is the article referred to.:
"William Haehnke, who has
one of the best cultivated farms
in this part of the range, will de
vote his time to stock raising in
stead of gardening. There is
more profit in the former, and
the danger of loss by frostsof
frequent occurrence between
seasonsis eliminated.
"Mr. Haehnke's experience is
interesting. He bought 12 sheep
a year ago from a packer who
was selling the animals that were
too lean and sickly for slaughter
ing. Mr. Haehnke hardly ex
pected the sheep to live. But
jaey did. They grew fat, and
this spring's crop of lambs be
came in one month almost the
size of full grown sheep. Last
winter the animals would brush
the snow from the shrubbery
and would eat the leaves and
twigs. Their only- protection
was a loosely constructed shed.
Mr. Haehnke has more than
doubled his money on the 12
'lean' sheep he bought last
year. 'I believe a man could
clear $2,000 profit a year from
sheep raising in this county,'
said Mr. Haehnke. 'They thrive
better and grow faster here than
in Iowa or the southern part of
this state.'
"Besides sheep Mr. Haehnke
has 60 head of cattle and a num
ber of hogs. He has his own
slaughter house at the farm, and
finds a ready market for all he
raises, in Eveleth, which is but
20 minutes drive from his place.
He is building an ice house for
cold stofage in suntiaer. Mr.
Haehnke has discovered that
beardless barley grows with
great luxuriance in this soil. 'A
few years ago,' said lite, 'people
laughed at me for* trying to
farm in this country. They told
me this soil wouldn't produce
anything. Now the same people
would like to buy my farm. I
refused $4,000 for my 160 acres,
and only a small part of it has
been cleared for cultivation.'
Notice a few of Our Bargains in
Pianos and Organs.
A $325.00 piano, manufactured
and fully guaranteed by the W.
W." Kimball Co. for five years,
$10 cash, $7 per month. A
$75 organ for $50, S5 cash, $3 per
mongi. Can you afford to let
this^'offer go by? Remember,
this ffe will hold good o^1"
un-
til "iday night, Aug. 14.
The above goods are on ex
hibition at Beaudette Bror
tailor shop. Store open eve. u^.
New House.
Police Officer Norman Helmer
is having a pretty home erected
at the corner of Mississippi
avenue and Sixth street.
HUNTING SHOULD
BE GOOD
Reports of Feathered Game
in Northern Minnesota are
Encouraging.
v*
A*
PRECAUTIONS TAKEN TO PRE
VENT UNLAWFUL SHOOTING.
The Resident Hunters Will Need
No License for Small
Game.
hen information was received
offices of the state game
and fish commission of the ar
rest at Crookston of sportsmen
charged with shooting chickens
out of season one of the officials
said that there are many chicken
hunters in Minnesota who can
not wait for the chicken season
to open Sept. 1.
Chickens are getting large
enough to shoot and the tempt
ation to "poach" in cases has
proved irresistable. The com
mission estimates that the north
ern part of the state will be alive
with game this fall. Reports
from all the northern counties
where chickens are to be found
state that the hatch this year is
splendid.
It is stated that the crop in
Southern Minnesota is not so
good as usual. This is thought
to be due to the wet weather
which prevailed in that district,
in the spring and early summer.
The commission is exercising
care to prevent "sooner" shoot
ing. A special corps of deputy
game wardens has been sent in
to the chicken district, and the
country is said to be carefully
patrolled. Violations are pun
ished by fines from $10 to $25
and the costs of prosecution, or
imprisonment ten to thirty days
in the county jail.
The season will open on Sept.
1 for turtle doves, snipe, prairie
chickens, pinnated, white-breast
ed or sharp-tailed grouse, wood
cock, plover and wild ducks and
geese. The season for wild
ducks and geese will close on
Dec. 1 and the season for the
rest Will close Nov. 1.
The Jaw requires that no per
son shall kill in one day more
than twenty-five birds or shall
have in his possession more than
fifty doves, prairie chickens,
ducks, grouse, etc., and not more
than 100 snipe or wild geese.
Under the new game law,
resident hunters of small game
will not have to take out any
license, while non-resident must
pay a fee of $10. For big game
resident hunters must take out
a license at a cost of $1. Non
resident licenses cost $25.
RAPID GROWTH
Fifteen Business Blocks
Course of Construction at
Northome.
in
C. W. Speelman was down from
Northome yesterday. Speaking
of the rapid growth of this new
town Mr. Speelman said:
"Its growth is something to
rrvel at. Buildings are spring
j upon all sides. Just before
ming down to Bemidji I count
ed fifteen business blocks in the
course of construction. Every
one is busy and we expect great
things of the town. There are
no residences going up yet, for
the residence district is not
platted."
THE DAILY PIONEER
BOARD REJECTED
ALL BIDS
Will Be Another Delay in
Building Addition to the
School House.
CONSIDERED THAT PRICE ASKED
FOR WOR IS TOO HIGH.
After Slight Change in Specifica
tions More Bids Will Be
Called For.
All bids for building the new
addition to the village school
house were rejected at the meet
in" of the board of education yes
terday afternoon. There were
only two bids entered, but both
of these called for an amount
about double what the board
originally intended to expend on
the improvement.
The plans and specifications
for the four-room addition, with
basement, the whole to be con
structed of brick and stone, were
'drawn by Bert D. Keck, the
Crookston architect. He esti
mated that the cost of the build
ing complete would be $4,500, or
$5,000 at most. When the bids
were opened at the meeting of
the board, it was found the cost,
if either was accepted, would be
in the neighborhood of 9,000,
and the school commissioners
gasped for breath and started
figuring. Three or four meet
ings were held to consider the
question, with the result that
yesterday it was decided to re
ject all bids. At first was
thought that by leaving off cer
tain improvernehts for the pres
ent the cost would be consider
ably lowered, but it was found
that even by doing this there
would be a saving of only five or
six hundred dollars. There was
a little talk of leaving off the
basement, but the latter is con
sidered absolutely indispensable
andthethoughtofleaving.it out
of the calculations was immedi
ately dismissed. The full base
ment can be used either as a
gymnasium or as space for two
additional school rooms.
The contractors say they have
plenty of jobs on hand now, that
labor is scarce and high and that
no cheaper price for building the
addition can be made. Mr. Keck
said that he could make slight
changes in the specifications
which would lower the cost of
building, and he was instructed
to do this.
I. MEYER BACK
Had a Pleasant Time On His
Business Trip to New
York City.
I. Meyer, of I. Meyer & Co.,
the clothiers, returned last night
from a purchasing trip to New
York city. Speaking of his trip,
Mr. Meyer said:
"I enjoyed the trip immensely.
Although I went east on busi
ness, I took time for a little
pleasure. On my return trip I
stopped off for a few days at the
Pabst Whitefish Bay summer re
sort near Milwaukee, and had a
very pleasant time while here.
The east appears to be in a pros
perou cimdition. Everyone seems
busy and satisfied with the pres
ent era of prosperity."
John Flatley and family re
turned to Bemidji last night from
visiting relative* at Verndale.
W HOLE S A E
A N
RETAIL
Julius Moersch, of St. Paul,
state factory inspector, is in
town today. This is his first
visit to Bemidji and he is well
pleased with the city.
"I like the busy appearance of
your town," he said today, "and
must say that it gives great
promise of developing into a
large and prosperous city. Your
beautiful little lake is a gold
mine in itself."
A want ad in the Daily Pioneer
is a winner. Try one.
COUNCIL MEETING.
BEMIDJI, MINNESOTA, TUESDAY. AUGUST ])Ql903. TEN CENTS PER WEEK.
Aug. 10, 1H03.
Council met at 8 p. m.
All members present.
Minutes of last meeting read
and approved.
On motion of Graham, sec
onded by Hazen, that the follow
ing audited bills be allowed. Car
ried
The. i\I. C. Lilly Co., mdse $. 21 98
E. H. Winter & Co., use
of hay rake 5 00
Jerrard Plumbing Co.,
repairs 5 40
Ed Kaiser, printing, July 12 50
Band, one day G. A. K.
encampment 50 00
E. J. Achenbach,lumber 8 00
G.G. Fuller, band teacher 10 00
W. Cachairs, labor,
Pogue 6 00
C. S. Trodler, sawing
wood 4 00
Standard Oil Co., six
bills 102 O
Bemidji Fire Depart
ment, from May 28th
to Aug. 10th, 1903.... 98 00
Justices Reynolds and Achen
bach presented their reports for
week ending Aug. 9th, 1903. On
motion of Bowser, seconded by
Bailey, the same be placed on
file. Carried.
The following resolution was
introduced by Councilman Hazen
and seconded by Councilman
Bailey:
Resolved, that the president of
the village council of ttie village
of Bemidji be and he is hereby
voted the sum of five hundred
dollars, to be expended in pro
moting the business welfare of
the village in inducing new
manufacturing enterprises and
to aid in securing the location of
a United Stated land office here.
On the call of ayes and nayes,
the following councilmen voted
aye, Graham, Hazen, Bailey
nayes, none.
Petition of Captain J. L. Reyn
olds presented, asking for use of
city hall one night each week for
military company drill. On
motion of Bowser seconded by
Bailey the same be granted.
Carried.
Petitions of Warfield Electric
^^w^w^w^ws^^^^^^v^^ww^^ww^^^^^^^^^*
^^^^^^^v^^^*^^^^^*s^^^^v^^vww^^^*
LIKES BEMIDJI STABLES READY
Julius Moerch, State Factory Horses are to be put in Train-
Inspector, is in Town \M at the new Fair
Todav,
FRED C. SMYTH, President TH0S. P. SMYTH, See.-Treas. 1). C. SMYTH, Manager
BEMIDJI MERCANTILE CO
Opposite the Old Court House
Groceries, Flour, Hay and Grain
Phon
2 1 5
(J rounds.
There is now stable room for
ten horses at the fair grounds
and a number of racers will be
put in training within.a tew days.
Some of the horses are to be
brought from Crookston. Work
of grading the half-mile track
has been started, and while it is
not yet in a lit condition for a
spirited contest it is alright for
training. The track is to be
fenced in and a judge's stand
will be ^erected opposite the
stand.
Co. and Chester Snow presented
and placed on file.
Council adjourned to meet
jThurs'tay evening! Aug. 13, [-903,
at p. m.
J. A. LtJDINGTON,
President.
II. W. BAILEY, Recorder.
IT. A. Broinleigh of Washing
ton. D. C, is registered at, the
Markham.
Miss Anna Anderson and Win.
Nelson, both of Nyniore, were
married at that place last even
ing.
The Christian Endeavor society
will give a social in tin' lecture
room at the Presbyterian church
Friday evening. All are cordially
invited to attend.
FATAL NEIGHBORHOOD FEUD.
Father and Son Are Dead and Their
6layer Is Injured.
Guthrie, Okie.., Aug. 12. As a re
sult of a neighborhood feud William
Cooper and hie sou, James Cooper, are
dead, and Sam Barrett severely
wounded. The parties were farmers
living near Oleta, Woodward county,
and bad blood has existed for over a
year. The partieb met at a public
well and in the altercation young
Cooper shot Barrett in the face with
a load of shot. Barrett then seized a
shotgun and killed both the Coopers.
Barrett is in jail at Woodward.
VENDETTI IN COAL MINE.
Pistols, Shotguns and Bowie Knives
Are Used.
Clarksburg, W. Va., Aug. 12.At the
O'Neill coal mines at Wllsonburg yes
terday a rendettl, Italian miners, at
tacked American mine employes. Pis
tole, shotguns and bowie knives were
used. Thirty or forty shots were fired
and Lewis Cortes, one of the Italians,
was killed. Lewi Chappano was'
wounded in the leg and side and may'
die. Another Italian received a charge
of shot. A detail of officers are on the!
scene. B. C. Rowan, Bdward Rodey
and John Freeman were arrested.
FACTORY BLOWS UP.
Three Workmen Killed and a Dozen
Others Are Injured.
Portsmouth, Ohio, Aug. 12.Humph-
reys & Hogan's canning factory near
here blew up at noon yesterday, kill
ing three workmen and injuring a
dozen others. The factory was lighted
yesterday for the lint time this sea
son and the building was blown to
atoms.
I (i S
(i 0 0 1) 0
E A
.VVVVVWWVNANrVVVVVSA/VVVSAA/VNA/VN*^
DAMAGE BY STORM
HURRICANE OF GREAT VIOLENCE
SWEEPS ISLANDS OF THE
ANTILLES.
Hl!NI)Rfi)S OF ItOUStS WRfCKED
TOWNS ON ISLAND OF MARTIN-
IQUE SUFFER GREAT
DAMAGE.
SPECIAL WARNINGS SENT OUT
PEOPLE ON ATLANTIC COAST
NOTIFIED TO PREPARE FOR
DISASTER.
Washington, Aug. 12. A hurricane
Is approaching the United States from
the southeast, and the weather bureau
has Bent out warnings to people along
the Atlantic roast to prepare for what
may be a disaster. Shipping also has
been warned to remain in port.
Island Towns Suffer.
Fort-do-France, Martinique, Aug. 12.
Sunday night the Iwlan of Martin
ique was swept by a hurricane of great
violence, fts duration was ten hours
and it was particularly severe during
two hours at For_t-de-France, where it
caused much destruction. Hundreds
of houses were unroofed and several
sailing vessels were badly damaged.
No fatalities, however, have oeen re
ported. The streets are incumbered
with debris from the tiled roofs and
the roads are impassable on account
of fallen trees, which were literally
torn up by the roots. Several towns
OH the island suffered considerably,
principally Trlnito, St. Marie. Carbet,
St.. Joseph and Francois. The storm
moved in a northwesterly direction.
Banana Properties Ruined,
Kingston, Jamaica, Aug. 12. The
tall of a hurricane moving over the
Antilles struck the eastern end of the
island of Jamaica, doing great damage
to banana properties. The full ex
tent of the injury is still unknown.
It Strikes Porto Rico.
San Juan, P. R., Aug. 12.The peo
ple of the island are alarmed over the
high southeast winds which are blow
ing. Hurricane signals have been set
by the order of the weather bureau.
Barbados reports that a hurricane per
vades northwest.
CONTROVERSY IS ENDED.
No Saloons Will Be Allowed MM
Bremerton Navy Yard.
Olympla, Wash., Aug. II.The con
troversy between the navy depart
ment and the town of Bremerton over
the question of saloons in the neigh
borhood of Bremerton yard, was set
tled finally yesterday by a decision of
the state supreme court, which refused
a Bremerton saloonkeeper permission
to run his saloon pending aa appeal
from an adverse decision of the lower
court. The Bremerton town council,
at the suggestion of the navy depart
ment, recently repealed all saloon li
censes. The saloonkeepers question
the council's authority to do so.
Uses Search Light.
Winona, Aug. '2Charles J. May
bury will use a .ft with a hole in
the center, thr- which a powerful
electric light be inserted, so that
the river bottoi^ may be seen, in
his search for the body of his young
son, who was drowned at this place a
week ago. All ordinary means nave
been exhausted in the search for tho
boy and now the entire river bottom
in front of the city is to be explored.
for the body.

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