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The daily pioneer. [volume] (Bemidji, Beltrami Co., Minn.) 1903-1904, November 12, 1903, Image 1

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CITY STILL BESIEGED
REVOLUTIONISTS CONTINUE THE
BOMBARDMENT OF THE SAN
DOMINION CAPITAL.
SOME LOSS OF LIFE IS REPORTED
NUMBER OF GOVERNMENT SOL-
DIERS AND SEVERAL NON-
COMBATANTS DEAD.
to the city
San Domingo, Republic of
Domingo, Tuesday, Nov. 10.The city preceding day.
Is closely beSieged by the revolution-) vessels are here
ists and commerce paralyzed.
\j Firing in and aror.nd San Domingo
continues. Many shells are falling in-1
Gazelle are here.
Previous to beginning the bombard
ment of San Domingo the revolution
ists notified the diplomatic corps and
the consular officers that they had
previously served notice on the Do
minican government that the forces
fof the revolution intended to adopt all
means, including a bombardment, in
their efforts to capture the city.
The situation here is becoming very
critical and the presence of more war
ships at San Domingo is urgently re
quired.
The guard for the German consul
ate, which was landed from the cruis
ers of Germany now in port, is in
constant4 communication with the lat
ter by muans of a signal station which
has been erected over the consulate.
GOVERNMENT LOSS HEAVY.
Several Non-Combatants Also Killed
at Sari Domingo.
New York, Nov. 12.A dispatch
from Santo Domingo, dated Nov. 9,
says the attack on the city by the rev
olutionists, which began last Friday,
was still in force Monday.
During all of Saturday night, the
disDatch continues, the insurgents at-
tacked the outposts with small arms
and also delivered a rather heavy
shell fire. The government, however,
succeeded in repelling the attack, al
though with considerable loss. The
losses of the revolutionists were
slight. Some foreign non-combatants
were killed.
During an attack on Sunday after
noon an insurgent shell passed within
a few feet of Mr. Powell, the Ameri
can minister, at the legation.
A sortie was made by 140 govern
ment troops, but they were ambushed
and compelled to retire within the
walls, leaving their dead and wound
ed on the field.
Early Sunday night there was an
other heavy attack, but the rebels
were again repulsed. The losses are
unknown.
Several shells exploded in the city
this morning.
The German cruiser Gazelle arrived
Monday and landed marines. The
Santo German cruiser Panther arrived the
No other foreign war
AFFECTE
New York, Nov. 12.At the office of
J. P. Morgan & Co. it is said that Mr.
Morgan has no intention whatever of I
retiring from active business and that
reports that he has such intention
are entirely incorrect.
GIVEN INCREASE IN WAGES.
General Advance Granted to Utah
Coal Miners.
Salt Lake, Utah, Nov. 12.The coal
miners of this state have been grant
ed an increase of 10 per cent in their
wages. Specials from the different
camps show that the advance has
been general, the rate of pay being
rai?ed from 2.50 to $2.75 a day.
AAMAt^^J^Al^AJVllVl'^^'' y^yyyyyyyyyi^yUUywys*^^^**/.A^*^^****^^^**^**^*^********
Any day this month and buy one of our Suits
and Overcoats. The price went down this
morning. W had too large a stock to think
of selling at a profit. Didn't want to carry
any over, so just cut off all the profit and a
little of the cost.
The price will be
3-4
of our regular price, and will apply to any
Man's, Boy's or Child's Suit or Overcoat in
the store. W have enough to fit out every
man and boy in Bemidji but those served
first get the selection. Better not delay.
Q\ML-
.^in^g-irnrrrrrrrrrrnrrrr-------- rrrrrrrrrrrr
VOLUME 1. NUMBER 174. BEMIDJI, MINNESOTA. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1903.
AMERICAN STOCKS.
Rumor in London That
The political situation is un- London, Nov. 12.The report from
changed. I New York to the effect that J. Pier-
The German warships Panther and! pent Morgan proposed to retire from
P. Morgan
Would Retire.
business was given prominence in the
newspapers here and the weakness of
Americans on the Stock Exchange
was attributed thereto, though the op
erators were somewhat skeptical as
to the truth of the rumor.
"The king of trusts," "the Morgan
izer of the world," "the financial
Titan," are a few of the titles be
stowed on Mr. Morgan by the papers
which comment on the report.
Mr. Morgan's London house* de
clares the report .of his intended re
tirement to be "quite untrue."
^S 4
Bemidji, Minn.
Baltimore, Nov. 12.In a wild fren
zy of revenge seventy members of the
graduating class of the Western high I
school have set upon Miss Lillie Ben
gert, their classmate, whom they ac
cused of being a "talebearer." They
scratched her face until the blood ran,
pulled her hair out, tore her hat to
s'pees. kicked her books into the pr.i-
DISORDER AT BOGOTA
ANTI-GOVERNMENT UPRISING OC
CURS IN THE CAPITAL CITY
OF COLOMBIA.
THE DAILY PIONEER.
200 GIRLS POUND
A CLASSMATE
In a Frenzy of Revenge Girl Students
Seriously Assault On of
Their Number.
MILITARY POWER S SUPPRES S RUTINS! & SBSuSf
AMERICAN LEGATION UNDER THE
PROTECTION OF TROOPS OF COLOMBIA SHUT OUT.
ler ana men triea to tear oir net* dom
ing.
Miss Dengert finally broke away and
ran. pursued by nearly 200 girls. She
finally dashed into a grocery and the
clerks barred the doors until the po
lice scattered the crowd. The rioters
were fifteen to eighteen years old
and the scene of the trouble was the
most fashionable .quarter of the city.
mg the president and calling for a
change of government.
Hundreds gathered at the palace
and the orator, a prominent national
general, called for the resignation of
the president. The gathering was dis
persed by the troops, several people
being wounded but there was no fatal
ities. The city was under martial law
and well guarded by soldiers. The
legation of the United States was un
der the protection of the government
THE REPUBLIC. Future Canal Negotiations Will Ee
With Panama.
Washington, Nov. 12.It is stated
hero on authority that it is too late
for Colombia to make any effort to
resurrect the canal treaty with the
Washington, Nov. 12.The state
department has received a cablegram
from United States Minister Beaupre, United States and beyond preventing
at Bogota, dated Nov. 9, in which the I a hostile clash between Colombia and
minister states that large crowds the new republic of Panama the? pro-
were parading the streets on the 8th Posed visU of General Reyes to Pan
inst. crying "Down with Marroquin.
There .was a mass meeting denounc
w^ff^w^^*WF
fS3*SS
of Lorenzo Marroquin (believed here
to be a senator and son of the presi
I dent) has been attacked with stones.
ama will be without result. The
same authority points out that the
United States government, having rec
ognized Panama as an independent
state, cannot now proceed to nego
tiate with Colombia on any terms for
canal rights in a state over which
Colombia exercises no political con
trol so any future canal negotiations
will be between the United States
government and the government of
Panama.
Mr. Tower, our ambassador at Her
lin, has cabled the state department
that, bo has been requested by Baron
iRichthofeu, the German foreign secre
tary, to inform the Washington gov
ernment that the report that Germany
intended to become involved in lb
isthmian situation is entirely without
foundation and that nothing is known
in Berlin of the intention of Colombia
to appeal to Emperor William for as
sistance as was alleged in a recent in
terview by the Colombian consul gen
eral al New York. "Mr. Tower adds
that he was further assured^by th"
foreign secretary in a most earnest
and sincere Hanner that the ([nestion
of Germany's interfering in Panama
simply did not exist.
DISCUSS PANAMA AFFAIRS.
Minister Porter Sees Head Of French
Foreign Office.
Paris, Nov. 12.Ambassador Por
ter caller at the foreign office dur
ing the day and had a long and agree
able conversation with Foreign Min
ister Delcasse concerning the events
at Panama. The discussion showed
that a most harmonious accord of
Views existed between the two govern
ments. The ambassador took occa
sion to thank M. Delcasse for the
friendly and sympathetic attitude of
France.
The numerous informal conferences
held between M. Delcasse and General
Porter have contributed largely to
ward insuring the French attitude of
leaving the United States untram
meled in connection with isthmian af
fairs.
WILL GRANT TIME EXTENSION.
Panama Canal Company to Permit
New Treaty Negotiations.
Paris, Nov. 12.W. N. Cromwell,
American counsel for the Panama
Canal company, sailed during the day
for New York. During his stay there
Mr. Cromwell held extended comer- I
ences with the company and he goes
home prepared to represent the com
pany during the negotiations for a
new canal treaty. The company's of
ficials have announced their willing
ness to grant an extension of time
for the American purchase of the con
cession, sufficient to permit the nego
tiation and ratification of a new
treaty.
It is understood that Mr. Cromwell
Is authorized to give assurances on
toe subject of the extension.
TROUBLE EXPECTED THERE.
United States Gunboat Concord Goes
to Buena Ventura.
Panama, Nov. 12.The United
States gunboat Concord, whieh left
here Tuesday affernooon, is said to be
bound for Buena Ventura. The United
States cruisers Boston and Marble
head remain here.
The last news received at Panama
from Buena Ventura was to the effect
that the Colombian authorities were
expecting an auacl on mat port from
the direction ot Panama thai they
were building entrenchments and
that the Colombian gunboat Bogota
was being stripped for action.
BY PAYING $6,000,000.
Philippine Government to Acquire
Friar's Lands.
Washington, Nov. 12.-Advices
reaching the war department from
Manila indicate that before he sails
for the United States on Dec. 22, Gov
ernor Taft will have succeeded in
settling one of the most vexatious
problems connected with the acquisi
tion of the Philippines, namely, the
adjustment of the claims of the friars
for their extensive property holdings
in the islands. Negotiations to th|s
end have been in progress at Manila
between Governor Taft and Mgr.
Guido, the papal delegate, ever since
the governor's return to the island
from Pome. The main obstacle to a
settlement appears to have been an
issue between the papal delegate and
the religious orders as to the propor
tion of the purchase money to be paid
by the insular government that was to
be turned over to Pome. The friars
naturally desired to receive the major
part of the allotment and when ftey
learned that Live niivh insisted upon
a certain sum they sought to make
good their own proportion by increas
ing the sum total of the price de
manded for the lands. This ran til
total up to about $14,000,000, a sum
entirely beyond any "figure which, t'pt*
insular government was willing ti
consider. Realizing thai with fii
ernor Taft's departure the ch I
a settlement would become more
mote f,he church authorities IK. ui1
pressure to bear upon the friars v'.'.'n
the result that, the insular government
expects to be able to acquire their
entire holdings in the Philippines for
a sum approximating $6,000,000.
BRYAN SAILS FOR EUROPE.
Again Declares He Is Not a Presi
dential Candidate.
New York, Nov. 12.-- Before he
sailed for EuiOpe on the Majestic Wil
liam J. Bryan was asked by an inter
viewer:
"Will the Democrats go to the polls
next year as a united party'?"
"I think all Democrats will be
united at the polls but not, of course,
those who are not Democrats. Those
who are not Democrats will not bo
with the Democrats."
"if all agreed upon you would you
accept the nomination?"
"I am not a candidate 1 have said
this before. 1 repeat it. I am not a
candidate for the oflice.
"On my return 1 shall simply re
sume my light for nomocracy and
what I shall do can be gauged b.v what
I have done in .the past. 1 hope to
keep up the fight for at least twenty
live more years. 1 will then be sixty
eight years of ago and in iho mean
time there will be six presidential
elections. Even then 1 may not be too
old to continue iho light."
Mr. Bryan would not discuss the
Panama situation at this time.
THOUSANDS RETURN TO WORK.
Properties of Amalgamated Copper
Company Resume.
Butte, Mont., Nov. 12.Work was
resumed during the day in ail the
properties of the Amalgamated Cop
per company in the state, fn Butte
8,500 men went back to work, in Ana
cbtida 2,000 men are again employed
in the Washoe smelter, and at Great
Falls the Boston and Montana smelter
has started up with a full force of
2,000 meu. The work of lowering
mules, horses and tools in the mines
was begun during the morning and
before twenty-four hours the three
shifts will by* working as before.
The Butty Miners' union has adopt
ed resolutions thanking Governor
Toole for his action in calling a spe
cial sessipii of the legislature. The
working people of Butte atfu the state
are jubilant and the depression that
has been felt in business circles for
the past twenty days is much relieved.
Amalgamated officials say that the
other properties of the Amalgamated
in Idaho and Wyoming will be started
up at once. Directly and Indirectly
nearly 21,000 men will return to
ffork.
AFFECTS THIRTY THOUSAND.
General Reduction In Wages at Fall
River Mills.
Fall River, Mass., Nov. 12.No-
tices were posted during the day in
the cotton mills of this city announc
ing a general reduction of 10 per cn
in wages to take effect Nov. 23. About
30,000 operatives are affected.
The cut Is attributed to the un
settled state of the color goods trade,
resulting from the high price of raw
material and to a pronounced hesita
tion to buy on the part of usual pur
chasers.
The action taken In Fall River is of
widespread importance since a step
of this nature in this city usually is
followed by mill owners in Southern
and Central Massachusetts, Rhode Isl
and and Eastern Connecticut, where
a total of about 50,000 men are em
ployed.
It is thought that no general strike
will he ordered here at this time by
the Textile Workers' union, who will
consider the sltuatiom
Solely to Kestore o-raer.
St. Petersburg, Nov. 12.A dispatch
from Port Arthur received here says
in reference to the statement on the
subject published in the foreign press:
"It is declared here that the 4o troops
ordered to Mukden were sent there
Bolely for the purpose of restoring or
der. No other measures have been
taken."
TEN CENTS PER WEEK.
OPPOSITION GIVES IN
REPUBLICANS WHO FOUGHT CU-
BAN RECIPROCITY TO VOTE
WITH THEIR PARTY.
SPEAKER OF HOUSE SO INFORMED'
BELIEVE IT IMPOLITIC TO SHOW
DIVIDED FRONT SO EARLY
IN THE SESSION.
Washington, Nov. 12.~ Speaker Can
non has been assured by one of the
mo-it prominent loaders the oppo
sition to Cuban reciprocity* in the last
congress that there would be little or
no opposition among Republicans to
the bill carrying into effect the Cuban
reciprocity treaty. He told the speak
er that the attempt to form an oppo
sition had failed and that the Repub
licans would not join the Democrats in
voting the .Morris differential amend
ment on the bill.
The speaker was assured that the
sentiment among the Republicans-was"
to. stand by the speaker that it would
be impolitic to have a division of the
party at the beginning of the ses
sion.
FATHERED BY HANSBROUGH.
Bill Introduced to Repeal Timber and
Stone Act.
Washington, Nov. 12.Senator
llansbrough has introduced in the
senate a bill- which, by Implication,
repeals the timber and stone act un
der which laud is now admired at
$2.r an acre regardless of Its real
value. The measure is intended to
cure defects in existing laws, put a
quietus upon speculation in public
timber lands and an end to the frauds
Which recently have grown Into a
national scandal. It was referred to
the committeo on public lands, of
which the author is chairman.
If Senator HanEDrough's measure
becomes a law all the timber land on
the public domain will be withdrawn
from entry and the government will
enter-upon the policy of disposing of
its timber at its market value. One
provision in the bill prohibits the etv
try oT these lands under the houie
st ad or old land laws.
SENATE BEGINS BUSINESS.
Number of Petitions Received and
Many Bills Introduced.
Waahnlg'on, Nov. 12.- The senate
begun business in earnest during the
day by receiving for the first time
in tie session a number of petitions
and also many bills. Homo of the pe
titions protested against Senator
Smoot of Utah remaining In the sen
ate.
Mr. Cnllingcr (N. II.) was the first
of the senators to secure recognition,
for the introduction of bills and the
llti-'t bill introduced by him provided
for the election of a statute to (ioii
eral John stnik. r~**~
The house convened at 12 o'clock.
After prayer by the chaplain and the
reading ol the journal Messrs. Reed,
Walla and Kyle were sworn in as
members of the house.
On motion of Mr. Payne the house,
at 12:05', adjourned.
DIES AT KANSAS CITY.
Hen. Oliver Simmons, Member of
Canadian Parliament.
Kansas City, Nov. 12.Hon. Oliver
Simmons of Petrol la, Ont., a member
of the Canadian parliament, died here
during the day at the home of his
brother-in-law, Dr. C. H. Carson, of
Hearl disease, aged sixty-nine years.
Mr. Simmons was stricken last April
In Canada and was brought here In
the hope that a change of climate
might benetll him.
Mr. Simmons was bom in Ohio and
up to 1866 lived at Plalnfield, 111.,
where for a time he was In the em
ploy of the United States mail ser
vice.
INTRODUCED BY CULLOM.
Resolution Calling for Documents in
Panama Rebellion.
Washington, Nov. 12.Senator Cul
lorn, chairman of the committee on
foreign relations, presented the fol
lowing concurrent resolution:
"That the president be requested
to communicate to the senate If not
in his judgment Incompatible with the
public interests all correspondence
and other official documents relating
to the recent revolution on the isth
mus of Panama."
At Senator Cullom's request the
resolution was referred to the com
mittee on foreign relations.
SENT TO AN-
vv -.i.u.t.
ASYLUM.
Crank Suspected of Design on Presi
dent's Life.
Minneapolis, Nov. 12.Peter O.
Elliott, suspected of having designs
on the life of President Roosevelt and
who was recently under arrest at
Washington, D. C, has been com
mitted to the state insane asylum at
Rochester by the Hennepin county
probate court.
Elliott denied having any intentions
of harming President Roosevelt,
claiming he merely sought to see him
out of curiosity.

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