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The daily pioneer. [volume] (Bemidji, Beltrami Co., Minn.) 1903-1904, November 24, 1903, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90059049/1903-11-24/ed-1/seq-1/

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TO HEAR TESTIMONY
SENATE SUB-COMMITTEE GOING
TO CUBA IN CONNECTION
WITH WOOD CASE.
PERSONNEL NOT YET AGREED UPON
EVIDENCE CONCERNING CONDUCT
OF FORMER GOVERNOR
GENERAL DESIRED.
Washington, Nov. 24.The senate
committee on military affairs will des
ignate a sub-committee to go Cuba
to take testimony regarding ..ie con
duct of General Wood. The personnel
of the committee has not yet been
agreed upon nor the number of mem
bers. It is asserted that so much has
already been said about the conduct
of General Wood in Cuba that it will
be necessary to examine witnesses in
that island who cannot come to the
United States.
The committee held a brief session
during the day to continue the investi
gation of charges against General
Wood in opposition to his confirma
tion to be major general. Captain W.
J. Barden of the artillery corps, U. S.
A., who was engineer officer in charge
of street improvements at Havana dur
ing General Wood's administration as
governor general of Cuba, was the
only witness heard.
Captain Barden's testimony had no
important bearing on the charges
against General Wood. He was sum
moned at the request of Senator For
aker and is understood to oe one of
the officers General Wood is said to
have asked to nave called in to refute
certain charges which Rathbone had
indicated he would bring before the
committee.
Favorable action was taken on the
request of Major Rathbone for the
issue of subpoenaes for army officers
and permission was given him to pre
pare a list with statements as to what
he expected to prove by each. Major
Runcie will be the first witness when
the committee, meets Friday. He is
a
Men's Furnishing Goods.
Hen's Fine Neckwear in all the popular styles
now er route irom Havana xo tne
United States.
INTRODUCED BY CARMACK.
Resolution to Investigate Postoffice
Department.
Washington, Nov. 24.The session
of the senate began with the presenta
tion of a resolution by Mr. Allison
(la.), providing for the appointment of
Rev. G. J. Prettyman of this city as
chaplain of the senate for the present
session. The resolution was agreed to.
Mr. Carmack (Tenn.) offered a reso
lution authorizing the committee on
conduct of the executive departments
to investigate the postoffice depart
ment. It went over without discus
sion.
Mr. Cullom. (111.) presented the re
port of the committee on foreign re
lations on the bill to carry into effect
the Cuban reciprocity treaty. The
bill went to the calendar.
Mr. Hale (Me.) then moved to re
consider the vote by which the New
lands resolutions for the annexation
of Cuba was referred to the committee
on relations with Cuba. He made the
motion on the basis of a speech in op
position to the policy proposed by the
resolution, saying that this country
had already declared its policy with
reference to Cuba by enacting the
Teller resolution into law. By that
vote we had, he said, bidden godspeed
to Cuba in setting up a government
for itself, and for himself had been
agreeably surprised by the progress
made by Cuba in the right direction.
Messrs. Newlands and Piatt (Conn.)
discussed the resolution at some
length and the debate euded at 2:10
without any definite action being
taken.
ANTHRACI TE COAL FOUND.
Important Discovery in Stearns Coun
ty, Minnesota.
St. Cloud, Minn., Nov. 24.News
has reached here of a hard coal find in
Stearns county, which is said to be
of more importance than any other of
the. rerent discoveries which have
been made in Northern Minnesota.
Victor Stern, a well digger who was
employed in sinking a well on the
farm of Michael Schreifels, six miles
south of Cold Spring, Minn., encoun
tered a vein of coal twenty-eight feet
below the surface. Drillholes, which
were put through to test it, disclosed
that the vein was four feet thick.
Samples of the coal were taken to
Cold Spring and put to tests, demon
strating that it was an anthracite of
an excellent quality..
ftj-)J^j-LrtjYjj'ij'Lj\jVj^Jj\^ i*****'** M*MM^A^^A^**M^*MiM
BEMIDJI. MINNESOTA.
25, 50 and 75 cents each
We are showing a very large line of these Shirts the price is
from 45 cents to $3 each
Men's Underwear.
ZZ^^^^^^^^^Tiers.:%^ %^01Extr*"yyAnw\5Wnsd
1
Men's Flannel Shirts. Ladies' Outing FlannetlGowns Night Gownscents,
.0ner
!o
To
0
O :nt!emen's White Wool Ribfced Underwear 55 a suit *1 1 I1L \jl 1 I
I^vn
i'iTn*rrm*riTi*i"r***'T 'i~m-mmmmnm
THE DAILY PIONE
RIOTING IN CONNECTION WITH
CHICAGO STREET CAR TIEUP
BECOMES SERIOUS.
POLICE STONED BY ENRAGED MOBS
OFFICERS COMPELLED TO USE
REVOLVERS AND CLUBS
IN SELF-DEFENSE.
Chicago, Nov. .24.While prepare
tlons were being completed for the
opening of the State Street cable line,
not heretofore operated during the
Btrike of employes of the Chicago City
railway, rioters were engaged in try
ing to put out of commission the four
lines which the. company has been op
erating on a limited scale. Trolley
wires were cut in a half dozen places
on Halstead street and the cars on
that line were delayed over an hour
while repairs were being made under
police protection. An effort was made
also to blockade Archer avenue,
where it was apparently believed cars
would be run. Quantities of rocks
were found to have been hauled in
wagons and dumped on the tracks.
In policing the four branches opened
last week as well as the State Street
line patrolmen were stationed only at
street intersections except where
trouble was thought most likely to
occur.
Five trains were put in operation on
the State Street cable. While this
move was being made the board of
directors of the railway company were
busy formulating a reply to the latest
proposition of the strikers.
A serious riot occurred at Forty
first and State streets when the train
arrived at that point. Many shots
were fired by the police and one man
is believed to have been hit by a bul-
A good, warm Suit or
Overcoat can be. bought
at our store for less money
than they eost us laid
down. We'll admit that
this statement seems un-
reasonable, for Clothing,
like other articles of Mer-
chandise, is bought to serl
at a profit, and we do not
telieve in advertising to
sell goods at cost but the
facts are we-boueh-t a verv
much larger stock than
usual, and the season has
been unfavorable, hence
the sacrifice.
OFF OX ANY
vercoat
in the Store
Ladies' Wool Sweaters.
Ladies' Sweaters made in the Latest Styles from Fine Selected
Yarn at... ...$2.50, $3 and up to $6 each
Ladies' Outing Flannel Nigh worth 65
One lot Ladies' Outing Flannel Night Owns worth $1,
for A 79 cents each
0 WE SHOW TH LARGEST LINE OF
3,.5oeach LADIES' SUITS,ECOATS AND FURS
VOLUME 1. NUMBER 184. BEMIDJI, MINNESOTA, W AY, NOVEMBER 24, 1903. TEN CENTS PER WEEK.
SCORES INJURED
AND STRIKERS RIOT
49 cents each
let, wnue several were KnocKed down
by the officers.
Forced to Charge Rioters.
The'cars encountered obstacles all
along the line. After removing spikes
from the cable slots at Fifty-seventh
and Fifty-first streets the train was
blocked at Forty-first by iron rails
placed across the tracks. The crews
began to remove the obstructions
when, from behind fences, came a vol.
ley of stones. The police charged the
rioters with revolvers drawn. A run
ning fight followed in which the police
fired upon the mob.
By this time a crowd had collected
about the cars and another charge by
the police was made upon them before
the obstruction could be removed.
At Twenty-ninth street another mob
blocked the cars and threw rocks.
The police charged, beating many
persons severely with their clubs.
More trouble was encountered by
the State Street cable trains on the
return trip near Forty-third street.
While the trains were down town
the mob systematically choked the
cable slot with stones and scrap iron
and blockaded the tracks with heavy
steel rails. Hundreds of men, women
and boys thon awaited the return ol
the police with rocks ready to heave
at the trains. Men and women were
reported to have been knocked down
Iii their own doorways. Scores of riot
ers and bystanders wore wounded by
the clubs of the police.
AFFECTS 32.000 OPEnATIVES.
Cut in Wages in Effect in New Eng
land Cotton Mills.
Boston. Nov. 24The first of tho
numerous reductions in wages an
nounced in the cotton mills of South
ern New England and at half a do~en
points outlJde of that territory went
into effect in all but one Fall River
corporation Monday and at a number
of outside mills.
Although about 32,coo operatives
had their pay cut down no general
strike occurred in any mill. The cut
averages to per cent and places the
pay schedules on a basis with those
paid previous to the advance of March,
1(J02.
The reduction affected seventy-eight
mills in Fail River, operating nearly
25,000 hands, and about a score of cor
porations elsewhere in New England,
employing about 7,000 operatives.
The Fall River iron works, operating
four print, cloth mills, will cut down
wages next Monday and on that day
also nearly all Rhode Island and Con
necticut manufacturers will accept the
lower schedule. A cut in New Bed
ford will go into effect in two weeks.
MANY MOROS KILLED
THR EE HUNDRED SLAIN IN BAT-
TLE WITH AMERICANS.
Fight Rages for Five Days and tho
Filipino Forces Are Literally
Destroyed.
Manila, Nov. 24.Three hundred
Moros are known to have been !:ili-i
and many others were carried of?
dear] or wounded ar a rsntrli Of live
days' severe fighting on Jolo between
the American troops under General
Leonard Wood and the insurgents.
Major TI. L. Scott of the Fourteenth
cavalry and five Americans were
wounded.
General Wood landed near Siel lake,
In Jolo, Nov. 12. The Mores were
soon located and fighting began im
mediately and continue"! until Nov. I".
The fighting took place in a country
covered with swamps and rocks. The
Moros were driven across the country
from Siet lake to the town which
Panglama Hassen, the Moro leader,
had made his headquarters, and where
it was reported the Moros were 2,000
strong.
The rebel position was attacked in
the flank by the American troops, who
occupied the town, 2nd it is said fifty
were killed. K: ssen, with a small
party, surrender:1. Most of the Moros
went into the swam?3, out of which
they were driver on the 16th. On
Nov. 17 the American forces renewed
the attack on the remaining Moros,
of whom forty more were killed.
The rebel forces have been literally
destroyed by these operations of Gen
eral Wood, who says the Indications
are that there will be no extension .if
the uprising, which was handled with
out difficulty.
BURLINGTON BACKING IT.
Alaskan Railroad a Link in Interna
tional Line.
Portland, Ore., Nov. 24.F. C. Helm
of New York, leading spirit in the
Valdez, Copper River and Yukon rail
way' project, and J. D. McGilllvoray. a
well known Alaskan mining engineer.
have arrived In Portland on their way
from Valdez to the East.
The road which Mr. Holm's com
pany proposes to build will run from
Valdez to Eagle City and will have a
mileage of 413 miles. It is capitalized
for $10,000,000. It is hinted that the
Burlington is backing the scheme with
a view to making it a link in the con
tinuous railroad from New York, to
Paris, which Is now being considered i
seriously. It is said the Burlingtdn
Will build through to the coast. cojvj
neet with a railroad up the panhandle
of Alaska to the Valdez Sopper River
and Yukon line, whence a connection
vill be built to moot the Transsiberian
as soon as the Russian road is con
structed through to the Boring strait*, i
RELEASED ON $5,000 BAIL.
Ex-Mayor of Grand Rapids, Mich., Ap
pears in Court,
Grand Rapids, Mich., Nov. 21.Ex-
Mayor George R. Perry, charged with
having received a bribe of $3,333 from
Lant K. Salsbury while the Garman
Cameron water deal was in progress,
waived examination in police court
and was bound over to the superior
court for trial. He furnished bail to
the amount of $5,000.
Ex-Alderman Adrian Schriver has
pleaded guilty to the charge of hav
ing received $326 as a bribe from Lant
K. Salsbury for his assistance in push
ing the water deal. Schriver was ar
raigned in the superior court and, after
pleading guilty, was remanded for
sentence. It is expected that sentence
will be deferred, as Schriver will be a
witness for tho state in the other
prosecutions. Ho has already told the
prosecution secretly what he knows of
the deal.
In addition to the confessions of
Aldermen Schriver and Guys
oral other aldermen have confessed to
their share in the deal and are ex
pected to become state's witnesses.
Their names are not yet known, how
ever.
Bctirlvcf
sentence. I!
Diary's cohfes
have received $
says he was giv
that Salsbury
1125,000 when
to
.v.
sengers and Crew.
Seattle Wash., Nov'. 24.A speeffl
to the Post intelligencer from Ju lean
Alaska, announces that Bent, a 1 t:
a
senger on i he steamer
has arrived 1 hero, rei 0
I
i
hat hi
while ai
It
is to
hurv dops
n
10 have rei ei\ ed
deal was put
tin
through and that he was to have been
given 51O5.0.00 in bonds of the water
company that was to have been
formed.
MADE A RICH HAUL.
Minneapolis Burglar Secures ?5,CC0
WcTtfi of Gems.
Minneapolis, Nov. 2-J The local po
lice are looking for a burglar who]
entered the residence of Mrs. Louisi.
W. McNatr, 1301-Hkinden avenue, and
seemed 35.000 worth of jewelry.
The burglar was in the house nearly
an hour. He awakened .Mrs. McNftii
and made her tell where her diamonds
wore.
BOYCOTT ON COLON.
Steamers Touching There Cannot En
ter Cartagena.
Colon. Nov. 21.A decree was is
sue.I at Cartagena Nov. 16 setting
forth that no steamers shall be al
lowed to clear for Cartagena for Colon,
or enter Cartagena coining from Colon.
All the foreign consuls and steamship
agents at Cartagena have protested
without effect against the decree.
AM HOPE ABANDONED
PRACTICALLY CERTAIN STEAMER
DESTROYED BY SIL LS
AMERICAN LEGATION AT SAN DO-
MINCO V/RZCKED DURING
SCtViGARDMCNT.
INSURGENTS REFUSE PEACE PROPOSAL
COMMISSION CF FOREIGN MINIS-
TERS SENT TO MEET THE
REBEL LEADERS.
Ran Domingo, Nov. 2t.President
Wos Gil, in his efforts to brim: about
a peaceful arrangement with the in
surgent forces which are besieging
this city, has commissioned United
States Minister Powell, the Belgian
minister, the minister jjjf llaytl and
the Spanish minister to visit tho camp.
Consequently an armistice was agreed
upon and the peace commission con
sulted with the insurgent leaders. The
latter, however, refused to entertain
the peace proposals and manded
the surrender of the city.
The United States minister's resi
dence was destroyed during the pre
vious bombardment.
The inhal itauts of this city are MI
a state of panic.
The Italian thift! class cruiser I,i-
guria and the Dutch armored cruiser
De K'tyter have arrived here.
The sanitary condition of San no
minee is Kuod. but the inter are suf
fering from want of food. The prices
of provisions are very high.
CONFIRMED BY COGHLAN.
Report That General Reyes Has Left
for Washington.
WtrehlngTon! Nov. 24.'Rear Ad
miral Coghlan, commander of the
Caribbean squadron, cables the ri-fivy
department from Colon thai General
Reyes. he special commissioner of
the Bogota gqvernmen-t, tenders his
sincere thanks to President Roosevelt
and Secretary of tho Navy Moo1,
ciallsts foi m.
Son
the 1
I .ior, win
thai a mass i
passeng: ra or crew. It Is belfev
thai everybody on board perished. The
wreckage found, Bent says, consists
of pieces of lifeboats, life pre ervers'
and a large portion of her bull. Benl
states thai a terrific storm prevailed
for a week prior to Nov. 16, on which
date tic boarded the Excelsior at
Yak ut at.
The number of persons aboard the
Discovery, passengers and crew, is
estimated at thirty. The vessel lefl
Nome early in October and sailed from
Yakutat Oct 9. This was the last
seen of her.
The passenger list of the Discovery
Is in possession of the steamer's agent
at Nome and cannot be obtained.
INDICTM'LN". S TOR KUNUKtus. TWO PERSONS KILLED.
Louisiana Grand Jury Gives Evidence Explosion of Nitroglycerin Near Em-
of a Big Investigation. porium, Pa.
New Orleans, Nov. 24 The North- Emporium, Pa., Nov. 2 1-Two per-
ent federaj district grand jury has in- 1 sons were killed and ono seriously in-
dicted 227# persons for peonage and jured by the explosion u" a. large quan-
land frauds'. I lily of nitroglycerin ac the Keystone
The indictments for peonage are 1 nitroglycerin works, about a mile from
said to include some of the most here. Those killed ivere John Morse
prominent planters in the northern and II. Cruikshank. George Niekerson
Jut of the state. {had one of his lover limbs terribly
crush'-i. Hundreds of panes of glass
Funeral of Ex-Governor Drake. Wer
urokt
for
his gracious treatment at Colon by
our na\ ,l 1- rces.
Admiral Coghlan confirms the press
dispatches that General Key-s has de
parted for Washington, via Port Pi
nion, Cost.O Uin for a Conference
with Dr. Amador, a member of the
Panama commission, and others In the
United States. Before bis departure
he Informed Admiral Coghlan thai the
Panama government had cabled
Amador to await his (Reyes) arrival
Admiral Coghlan further states that
General Reyea ex-poets to open amica
ble negotiations with the special com
missioners from Panama now in
Washing! oh.
LABOR POLITICAL PARTY.
I Movement to Be National in Scone
rju
DISCOVERY IS LOST. New York, Nov. 24. The Central
Labor union of this city has begun a
movement to form a purely labor po~
Vessel Was Bound From Nome for litical party. A committee composed
of Democrats Republicans and So-
Seattle and Ca-tricd Thirty Pas-
Nc
Yor
to draw up a plat-
i
Centerville, la., Nov. 24 The fu- I
neral of ex-Governor F. M. Drake was Grievances About All Adjusted.
held here during the day. The serv- Pittsburg, Nov. 24.The grievances
Ices were conducted from tho Central of the street car men against the Pitts-
Church of Christ under the auspices i burg Railways company have abouL
of the S Johns commandery, Knights 1 all been adjusted. Rezln Orr, national
Templar. The "body lay in state for treasurer, who came here from head-
three hours in the church, which was 1 quarters at Detroit to take charge of
inadequate to accommodate the crowd. 1 affairs, says the company is disposed
The interment took place beside the to -hew *he men fair treatment and all
body of Mrs. Drake at Oakwood ceine- I thoughts of striking have been aban-
tery. dotted.
tbor men of
a Jiif cue
that as
mula 1
oon as a local
dans 1
laboi convention v. ill doubtless be
called- probably within a few weeks
and sj 1 to "MLC the o\o-
mori rmtio! al In scope
of wreckage from the Nome tonnife'r I vfKiKL frY-iVrPATHlZferiS SHOT.
Discovery has been washed ashore a!
the mouth of Seal river, thirty miles Nonunion Leather-workers at Chicago
belov/ Vahutat.
Bent's information makes it prac- Ch
ttcally certain that the Discovery Is I men
lost and leaves little bo i- for either' plant
Fire Into Crowd.
i. tl
Le pri
two
path!
Bhool
they
1 wo nonunion
!ed for Wo.4 at the
.-Ml "lean Hi' and
irnpany, fvhere a :-,trlke Is in
-'1 and seriously wounded
rs"ol a~crowd of strike sym
The iiu a who did the
ape I. Ii is claimed that
being attache! by the
Two men, Joseph Polachesky and
I Anton Zimmoosky, are suspected by
the police of having done the shooting.
I They formerly belonged to the union
and left it to seek work in the tan
I nery. They were turned away by the
foreman and as they left the place
were set upon by a crowd of rioters.
The men opened Are and two at their
I assailants fell to the ground. The rest
i broke and ran while the nonunion men
made their escape.
village.

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