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The daily pioneer. [volume] (Bemidji, Beltrami Co., Minn.) 1903-1904, November 30, 1903, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90059049/1903-11-30/ed-1/seq-1/

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SOME OBJECTION MADE
PRESIDENT t)ESIRES FIFTY PER
CENT REDUCTION ON PHIL-
IPPINE IMPORTS.
CONFERS WITH MEMBERS OF CONGRESS
REPRESENTATIVES FROM SUGAR
AND TOBACCO STATES OP-
POSE THE IDEA.
Washington, Nov. 30.For some
time past th president has been dis
cussing informfcly with members of
congress the proposition to reduce the
duties on Philippine products coming
into this country to 5%er cent of the
Dingley law rates.
Considerable opposition has devel
oped to the suggestion and what the
result of the endeavor to secure a re
duction of the duties will be cannot
now be foretold.
The opposition arises principally
from congressmen representing sugar
and tobacco states. They maintain
that if only 50 per cent of the Dingley
rates are levied on sugar and tobacco
the industries represented by those
products in this country will be im
paired seriously.
WOULD RESUME RELATIONS.
Servian King Sends Letter, to Presi
dent Roosevelt.
Berlin, Nov.. 30.Miletchevitch, the
Servian minister here, has requested
United States Ambassador Tower to
forward to Washington an autograph
letter from King Peter to President
Boosevelt informing him of his acces
sion to the throne. Mr. Tower accept
ed the letter and cabled the fact to
Washington.
The step taken by King Peter is
doubtless designed to bring about a
resumption of diplomatic relations be
tween Servia and the United States,
which lapsed after the assassination
Of King Alexander and Queen Draga.
John R. Jackson, the United States
minister to Greece, Roumania and Ser-
via. was marring a tour or me Bamans
at the time of the tragedy at Belgrade
and he avoided going to that city on
instructions from Washington. Indi
rect inquiries have been made to Mr.
Jackson by the authorities at Bel
grade as to whether he did not intend
to visit King Peter's court, to which
he replied that he would not do so un
til directed from Washington, which,
until Ambassador Tower forwarded
bis dispatch, had not been officially
informed that such a person as King
Peter existed.
IN THE MERGER CASE.
Attorney General Knox Will Make
Leading Argument.
Washington, Nov. -,.30. Attorney
General P. C. Knojr\will make the
leading argument for the government
in the case against the Northern Se
curities company in the supreme court
when the hearing occurs next month.
David K. Watson of Pittsburg, spe
cial counsel for the government, is
still connected with the case. He
made the principal argument when the
case was tried before the United
States circuit Vourt of appeals. Since
that time Mr. Watson has added to his
laurels by his great argument in the
Alaskan boundary case, which was
won by the United States.
Assistant Attorney General M. D.
Purdy. formerly United States district
attorney for Minnesota, will also take
part in the presentation of the govern
ment's case.
The chief argument for the merger
people will be made by James G.
Johnston of Philadelphia.
OWING TO ILL HEALTH.
Emperor William Withdraws Cup for
Yacht Race.
Berlin, Nov. 30.Emperor William
has withdrawn his offer of a cup for a
transatlantic yacht race in 1904, on
account of his health, and has substi
tuted for it the offer of a cup to be
raced for in 1905.
The emperor, through his represen
tative, cabled his decision to the Amer
ican yachtsmen during the day with
his reasons for the postponement.
These are that the prolonged period of
the emperor's recovery and the conse
quent accumulation of all business has
prevented him from receiving his
yachting advisers to arrange the de
tails of a transatlantic race until it
was too late for the designers and
builders to have new yachts ready for
a contest in the spring of 1904.
A Help to Make
A Merry Christmas
We Have Always Advocated Giving
Usefu ChristmasPresents
This year we will give everyone
A chance to buy useful Christmas Presents
for their male friends by
Extending Ou Clothing
Sale Another Mont
IHIHH9flHH9BBB3fl
During December any Mian's, Boy's or
Child's Suit or Overcoat in the store at
itoipi
WO BIG TIMBER DiALS.
Lumber Firm Pays $315,000 for Min
nesota Pine.
Duluth. Nov. 30.Two big timber
sales aggregating $315,000 have been
recorded in the office of the register
I of deeds of this county. The pur
chaser in each case is the lumber
firm of Alger. Smith & Co.
The descriptions of the property on
I which the timber is located are the
i same in each deed and two-thirds are
transferred by W. P. Wheelin and
wife of Neeedah, Wis., for $200,000,
while the remaining third is sold by
I George A. Potter for $115,000. A por
tion of the timber is located in St.
1 Louis county and the remainder in
i Lake county. The purchaser is al
lowed twenty-five years in which to
cut the timber.
REASON FOR CLOSING DOWN.
Shipbuilding Industry Ruined by Re
cent Revelations.
New York, Nov. 30.-"The fact that
the credit of the shipbuilding industry
has been completely destroyed by re
cent revelations regarding the promo
i tion of the United States Shipbuilding
company" is given as one of the prin
i cipal reasons for the closing of the
Townsend-Downy shipyards at Shoot
ers island in a statement issued by
I Wallace Downy, president of the
Townsend-Downy Shipbuilding com
pany.
CONSIDERED SATISFACTORY.
Turkey's Reply to Austro-Russian Re
form Scheme.
St. Petersburg, Nov. 30.Turkey's
reply to the Austro-Russian reform
scheme for Macedonia was received
with satisfaction at the foreign office,
where it is considered that the porte's
acceptance of the principles involved
assures the operation of the reforms
since it is not believed the sultan will
be able to delay a settlement of the
minor details. The press comment is
skeptical, however, on the latter point.
Many Men Out of Employment.
Everett, Pa.. Nov. 30.The dull mar
ket for pig iron has caused the Everett
furnace to be shut down indefinitely.
The force of workers will be reduced
at the company's mines and coke
works at Kearney. Many men have
been thrown out of employment.
e^iilar Price
VOLUME I. NUMBER 18* BEMIDJ.I, MINNESOTA, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 1903. TEN CENTS P-iS-S WEEK
\&
ENTIRELY FREE OF COS!
COLOMBIA OFFERS CANAL CON
CESSIONS WITHOUT PAY-
MENT OF A CENT.
ttNERAL REYES AT WASHINGTON
ONLY ASKS FOR A FREE HAND
IN PUTTING DOWN REBEL-
LIOUS ISTHMIANS.
Washington, Nov. GO.That the re
public of Colombia will grant to the
United States ab the canal conces
Bions provided foi in the Hay-Herran
treaty, but absolutely free of cost, is
the proposition which General Reyes,
envoy of Colombia to the United States
on a special mission, brings for the
consideration of the officials at Wash
ington.
General Reyes arrived hero shortly
alter it a. m. He was met at the sta
tion by a son of Dr. Herran, the Colom-
I GENERAL REYES.
Wan charge, and went at once to bis
hotel.
General Reyes talked with a repre
sentative of the Associated Press
about his mission. He said:
"You will readily, admit the pro
priety of my refkek'-.hag from discuss
ing my mission, which is of a confiden
tial character, hut of the offer which
Colombia is ready to make I desire to
say that my energies and those of my
followers will be devoted to tho grant
ing of the canal concessions- to the
United States without the payment of
a cent. Even at this Colombia will he
the gamer."
"Are you authorized by President
Marroquin to make this offer to the
Washington officials?"
"That would be divulging my in
structions before I have executed
them. 1 cannot say more about this
now," he replied.
Popular Demand for Canal.
"You can further say," continued
the general, "that all Colombia is afire
with zeal for the building of the canal
by the United States and the unfor
tunate political troubles which were
the sole cause of the treaty's death
before the Colombian congress have
entirely disappeared. We want the.
canal and I have tome to Washington
to see what the people of the United
States are prepared to accept. I come
with instructions from the president of
Colombia direct. My mission in no
way interferes with the prerogatives
of Dr. Herran, the Colombian charge,
for whom my government and myself
personally have the greatest respect.
I shall be in daily conference with
him and we shall work in entire har
mony. Dr. Herran will go to the
state department with me and pro
sent me to Secretary Hay."
"What is the feeling in Colombia
about the Panama revolution?"
"Feeling is running high and there
Is indignation over the events on the
Isthmus, We can and will put down
the rebellion ii no! interfered with
from the outside, Fo tense is the feel
ing and so national the spirit of de
termination to bring the isthmus back
into the republic thai President Mar
roquin will have no trouble in rais
ing an army twice the size necessary
to put down the disturbance. Such an
army ''an march overland to the isth
mus, the opinion of ill advised persons
to the contrary notwithstanding."
Only Asks a Free Hand.
"Whal can the United States do now
that a treaty has been signed by Sec
retary Hay and M. Bunau-Varilla?"
"That treaty has not been ratified.
The "Colombian government does not
isk the United States to aid it in put
ring d( wn the revolution on the isth
mus. All we ask is to be allowed to
conduct our own affairs free from out
Bide interference. The Colombian
government can put down the revolu
tion without violating a letter of the
treaty of 1840. I refer to the treaty
that we always have respected and ad
hexed to and not to the treaty as in
terpreter] in these later days. If the
United States maintains a neutral po
sition the revolution will be put
Jr'V.
li."
'''hen his attention was called to
the reports from Panamaian and ether
source- that he had com,, to Wasjiing-
1 1
ion to '0*i i ict i loony to ooreat
t.' [icntion ol the treaty Be said
ppati ally:
i authorize the Associated PrgSS to
sa\ for me at the outset of my visit
i that my movements here shall be
Btrictly in accordance N\ith the prow
r&fs with which am clothed. I shall
ileal with the officials of the Washing
I ton government direct, to whom 1 hoar
'letters of' credence from the Bogota
government. I am not here as a pri-
character."
APPEAL IS DENIED.
Court Approves Receivership for Ship
building Trust.
Philadelphia, Nov. GO.--The appeal
of the United States Shipbuilding
company against the decision of Judgi i
Kirkpatrlck appointing .lames Smith
Jr.. receiver Cor the corporation ha&:
been decided against the company
The opinion rendered by Circuit Court I
Judges Acheson, Pallas and Gray was
filed by the former. Judge Kiikp.it
riek's action Is austal'hed end the or
der fo the receive:ship made p"
manent or unci the further order of]
the court. The op*iniou, in part, ftfl
lows:
"Upon the whole we are of the opin
ion that the bill presented a case ol
which the circuit court, sitting In
equity, had jurisdiction ami that
appointment of a receiver was v.
the authority of tJiO court We
think there was evidence to
th*1
findings of the lower i u.t
justify the order appointing a iv
Whether a receiver should be,
ed was a matter largely svitl.in-!.
discretion of the court, in view ti
the special circumstances tho ca
Upon a careful examination we can
not say that the order appointing a
receiver and granting an injunction
was improvidently made."
LORD ROBERTS WILL RESIGN,
Health Compels Him to Winter
Warmer Climate.
PROTEST IS WITHDRAWN.
Indians Decide Not to Object to Sale
of Timber at Cass Lake.
Washington, Nov. 30. On advice re
ceive] from some of the Indians on
the home reservation William Lorsh
and Chief Nagabud, who have been in
Washington some time protesting
against the sab of pine at Cass Lake,
have about decided to withdraw their
present contention in the hope that
before the next sale there will be an
amendment to rule eight, which will
permit the burning of the debris from
the tops- of the trees in the spring.
It is understood that they have re
ceived some assurances to this effect.
BISHOP MESSMER CHOSEN.
Pope Ratifies Hi6 Nomination as Arch
bishop of Milwaukee.
Rome Nov. GO.The prefect of the
propaganda, Cardinal Gotti, has sub
mitted to the pope the name of Bishop
Messmer of Green Hay, wis., as the
choice of the propaganda for arch
bishop of Milwaukee in succession to
the law ArfiTbishop Katzer and the
pontiff ratified the nomination.
'pfvtioi^^ CRIMINAL RECORDS VERY BAD
in
London, Nov. 30.Although no pul
lie announcement of the fact has yet
been made it is understood that Lord I
Roberts is about to resign as
com-j1
mander-ln-chief. He has been much,
more ill than generally known, is still
abed and the condition of his health i
requires him to spend the winter In a
Southern climate.
The appointment of the royal com-i
mission to advise the government con
'COrning the creation of a board for the!
administrative business of the war.
oflleo and tho consequent changes in-j
volved is generally regarded as fore-1
shadowing the abolition of the post of
commander-in-chief, or at least mak-j
SEVERAL LIVES LOST.
Boardinghouse at Tower, Minn., De
stroyed by Fire.
Tower, Minn., Nov. GO.In the de- i
brls of a boardinghouse which was de
atroved by lire here is thought to be
the remains of two strangers, as all
others are accounted for. The build-'
ing was a frame structure and if the!
men were cremated there will be noth-1
ing left of them but the cinders
Thomas Green, pilot of the Vermil-1
lion lake steamer Odd Fellow, was
cremated, and Frank Thomas, a team
ster, was so severely burned that he
may die. The suspicion Is entertained
that the boardinghouse, which was
owned and operated by T. A. Thomas,
was destroyed by an Incendiary to
cover the crime of murder.
ENGINEER SAVES TWO LIVES.
I Throws Bellrope to Boys Who Had
Broken Through Ice.
Madison, Wis., Nov. GO. William
Miller and John Seollold, two Madison
-boys, were saved from drowning in
i Lake Monona by an engineer on a pas
senger train ori the Milwaukee road.
The engineer saw the boys strug
gling in the water as the train was
running He reversed the lever,
released the bellrope and threw it to
Miller. Both were dragged to the
shore.
Miller had fallen drough the Ice
while skating and Scolield bad jumped
In af'ei him in an heroic efforl to save
his om pan ion.
s^! SPEEBY TRIAL PLANNED
ing the position largely ornamental
and Lord Roberts is understood to eon-j perate battle with the police In which
sider that his present 111 health offers one man was killed and two policemen
an opportune excuse for his retire- wounded, appears evident from the
ment, thus leaving the field clear for
any changes which may be reeom-:
mended for the king's approval by the,
commission.
GRAND JURY ALREADY CONSID-
ERING CASES OF CHICAGO
DESPERADOES.
YOUTHS ADMIT PARTICIPATING
IN MANY RECENT MURDERS
IN WINDY CITY.
Cb.ie.iri Nov. 30,.While Harvey
Vandein, Peter Neidemelpr and Emii
II
at silently in tl
the Harrison street police station dur
ing flic i!ny the story of their crimes
was being presented to the gi it jury.
Following the return of indictments
it is planned to have the young
neradoes brought to an 'dmme
trial. As Gustav Marx, who was ar
rested several days ago after he had
murdered Detective Qulnn, and Neidc
meier and Vandein have already made
complete confessions of the car barn
murders, it is thought the prisoners
will pb ad guilty. In which case a
Bpoodj verdict will be reached.
Vandein's mother called on him at
the police station during the day. The
meeting was affecting.
When taken to the Chicago polite
headquarters after their capture in In
diana the boys made a full confession
of their share In the murders that
have been committed In the neighbor
hood of this city and confirmed the
confession of Gustav Marx, who. after
murdering Patrolman Quinn last Sat
urday, told of his part in the Chicago
I car barn murders Aug. 30 and inipli
cated Peter Neidomeier, Harvey Van
dein ami Emil Roeski.
All three of the men are wounded,
Roeski tho most .iously. having
I been shot in the thigh.
The boys admit being concerned in
I robberies In which eight men were
killed and five wounded.
ROESKI THE VICTIM.
Chicago Desperadoes Proposed Killing
Their Pal.
Chicago. Nov. GO. That another
murder was planned by the car bain
murderers, Vandein, Roeski and Nelde
meler, who were captured after a des-
confession of one of the trio, Roeski,
noTNH other than himself b^ing selected
as the possible victim.
In his confession to the police Roes
ki, who was captured In a station at
Aetna. Ind., while waiting for a train
to Chicago and after his companions
had already been taken Into custody,
says he was the drudge of the other
men He felt that he was not at any
tiin1\ln the confidence of his compan
ions and during the last few weeks
has believed that Neidomeier or Van
dein were ready to get rid of him, as
he expressed It.
"I never got much." he said. "They
used to buy me something to eat and
give men a few nickels once in a
while. They afterwards got 'sore' on
me because they thought I might give
them away. Marx told me that Neide
meler and Vandein were going to 'do
me up.'"'
Marx is the man who confessed his
part in the -car barn robbery after
murdering a policeman following the
robbery of a saloon and Implicated his
three companions who were captured.
OBERLIN CARTER RELEASED.
Ex-Captain of Engineers Now a Free
Man.
Leavenworth, Kan., Nov. GO.A
few minutes before I a. in. Oborlin M.
Carter, ex-capt'Ati of engineers, walked
out of the portals of the federal prison
at Fori Leavenworth a free man. At
the gates he was met by his uncle, L.
I). Carter, and immediately driven In
a hack to the Union depot in this city.
This last movement was a ruse to
throw the newspaper men, whom he
wished above all things to avoid, off
the track At the Union station he
was met by a representative of the
Associated Press and.'while awaiting
his train. Conversed freely on a large
niim'-r of subjects but always skill
fully avoided the introduction of any
thing in regard to his conviction or
I his plans for the future.
HAU LAKljfc. DtPOSlTS.
Private Bank at Casper, Wyo.,
Its Doors.
Omaha. Nov. G11.---A Bpeclal
World-Herald from Casper, W'v
the ir'alizcd at
po (its, Pai
spe ailatiou
the
H.
Closes
to the
says
Denecke private bank, cap
IO0 but carrying large
luring the day, over
stock loans being
ause. The N.
establishment
statement of hi
Iri ttol mercanti
down won tin bank an
Webel
17J100,
the
lost
mercantile establishment
Bullet Intended for Burglar.
Chicago, Nov. GO.Killed in the
Street by a bullet intended for fleeing
but I ap] ears to have been the fate
of year-old George Reynolds,
son of Captain Peter Reynolds of the
St Louis police department. Young
Revuoi was found in an unconscious
coi tion in Van Buren street near
ivM
ii and died as he was being
taken to a hospital.

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