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Red Lake news. [volume] (Red Lake, Minn.) 1912-1921, March 01, 1915, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90059061/1915-03-01/ed-1/seq-2/

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RE LAKE NEWS
A newspaper devoted to the interests of
the Red Lake Chippewa Indians.
Semi-monthly, Sept. 1st to July 15.
Subscription.. 75c a year
Entered as second class matter September
1,1912, at the postoft'ice at lied. Lake, Minn.,
under the act of March 3, 1879.
Address all communications to
RED LAKE NEWS,
Red Lake, Minn.
THE TEXT.
What is a failure? It's only a spur
To a man who receives it right,
And it makes the spirit within him stir
To go in once more and ligbt.
If you never have failed it's an even guess
You never have won a high success.
What is a miss? its a practice shot
Which we often must make to enter
The list of those who can hit the spot
Of the bull's-eye in the center.
If you never have sent your bullet wide,
You never have put a mark inside.
What is a knock-down? A count of ten
Which a man may take for a rest.
It will give him a .chance to come up again
And to do his particular best.
If you've never beeu bumped in a rattling gv
You never have come to the scratch, I know.
Edintouf Yinwe Ccokc.
UOCHEIIOLI) HELPS.
Kettles may be kept thoroughly cleaned
'toriliDp, pot-ato- pipings1
thrift:
In peeling onions place them in a bowl
of water and peel them so that the water
covers the onion, to prevent the eyes from
smarting.
To prevent the tinware from getting rusty,
rub well with lard and put in oven and heat
thoroughly. It can then be used in water
continually and it will remain bright and
free from rust indefinitely.
In washing tumblers that have contained
milk wasli first in cold water then in hot
water. The heat drives the milk in and
gives a dowdy appearance to the glass if
.cold water is not used first.
To scale thh easily dip them first in boil
ing water.
To keep milk from curdling add a pinch
of so'la to the milk.
Plate salt under baking tins in oven 1o
prevent contents from scorching on the bot
tom.
A littir flour sprinkled over the top of a
eake will aid in preventing the icing from
running off.
If you set a dish of water in the oven
Avhen the cake is baking, you will find that
there will be no scorching.
To prevent the odor of boiling ham or
cabbage throw a few bits of charcoal into
the pot in which they are cooking.
ixnrA vrrrzKSHurr DA AT I i/r-
7?ov
fxsrrn TE.
The forty-five Indian students at Hamp
ton Institute, representing seventeen dif
ferent tribes, held a most fitting and appro
priate celebration on the twenty-eighth an
niversary of the passage of the Dawes Hill.
The program included introductory remarks
by Fred Bender, a Chippewa a girls chorus
an 'address by Melvin T. Wildy, Xegro
representative a clarinet sob) by Davis
Oreen, an Onondaga a paper.
dian homes.
a
ieiu-es of a Hampton graduate in the Indian
schools, by Miss Elizabeth Bender, a Chip
pewa indian scenes from the Southwest,
(a) songs, (b) dances and the principal
address of the evening by Dr. J. J. (Jravatt,
of Richmond, Virginia.
The scenes from the Southwest, consist
ing of the Cheyenne farwell song, Pima
death song, Apache patriotic song, peace
song, the circle dance, sociable dance, hand
games, and the war dance, were given in a
beautiful forest setting representing an In
dian cam] The audience greatly appreciat
ed having shown and explained to them
these ceremonial songs and dances which
are fast becoming but racial traditions as
the younger Indians advance in civilization
and Christianity.
Dr. (Jravatt, the speaker of the evening,
wrs rector of the historic St. John's church,
Hampton, in 1878, when the first Indians
were admitted to Hampton Institute. He be
came very much interested in their religious
life and was quite closely associated with
them. He also made several trips West for
the Government to bring back new students.
Dr. Gravatt related many significant and
amusing incidents of those early days and
drew a vivid comparison of conditions
among the Indians in the school at that
time and the present.
Miss Bender, who has been teaching for
four years on the Flackfeet and Fort Belk
nap Reservations, and is now taking a post
graduate course at Hampton Institute, in a
pleasing modest manner told of her interest
ing experiences in the Indian schools. Miss
Bender also made a strong and earnest plea
to the Indian students to fit themselves to
co-operate with the doctors and Government
officials in fighting the terrible diseases of
tuberculosis and trachoma, which find an
.-ftXt*llewfc4H!ee4iHg
place h\ many-of the In-
TraHioma," she said, "is a disease that
without medical attention gradually im
pairs the sight until total blindness results.
The Government specialists found about
three years ago that 50,000 out of the ttOO,
000 Indian population had trachoma. Think
of it! Xearlv :\0 per cent of all Indian
children in danger of complete blindness!
We talk about demanding our rights, but
unless we are willing to assume responsibi
lities we cannot presume to make such a
demand. 1 feel so strongly these problems
that confront our people, but they are prob
lems we can all help to remedy, whether
our vocation in lift1
is that of a teacher, car-
penter, nurse, or blacksmith. The mission
ary field for service and for cousecrated
workers is broad. What a wonderful op
portunity for some of our young men to be
come doctors, fitted to cope with trachoma
and tuberculosis. Without medical aid
thousands of men and women will not be
self-supporting and they will be deprived
of their usefulness."
Fninn \a EWE xv. i TER.
It is something new for the Tndian to
fight the liquor traffic. Yet that is just
what the Xorthwest Federation of Indian
Tribes is doing. Heretofore it has beer
one sort of white man that has sold whiskey
to the red-skin and another sort that has
tried to keep him from it, with the aborigine
a mere lay figure. But the federation in
session in Taconia, has asked the Federal
Government for an appropriation of $150,-
001) for the express purpose of suppressing
the sale of liquor to Indians.
Demon Rum has received some body
blows recently, with Russia prohibiting the
sale of vodka and France frowning upon
absinthe and contemplating foregoing all
liquor. In Alabama a law has gone into
effect which forbids even an advertisement
of whiskey.
But those who speak for the moderate
use of alcoholic beverages, as well as the
temperance forces, will wish the Northwest
ern rribsmen well in their fight against al
cohol. It has been the blackest mark
against the palefacea refinement of cruel
ty which put to shame the crudities of to
mahawk and scalping knife.
All who have a spark of feeling for a
dying race will applaud the spirit which
prompted the Federation's action at the
same time feeling a vicarious shame that
we have so poorly fulfilled our duty to our
wards that it was necessary.Washington
(D. C.) Times, February 25, 1015.
WM SPEARS
BAKERY AND CONFECTIONERY
ClfiARS AND TOBACCO
CLUB ROOM IN CONNECTION
Come Around for a Good Time and
Get Your Money's Worth
A D. STEPHENS
President
THE
First National
Bank
Capital $25,000.00 Surplus $5,000.00
Bagley, Minnesota
UNITED STATES DEPOSITORY FOR
Individual Funds of RED LAKE Indians
5 PER CENT. INTEREST TAID ON TIME
CERTIFICATES OF DEPOSIT
WE SOLICIT YOUR BUSINESS
..Beaulieu Trading Store...
CHAS. F. BEAULIEU, Prop.
Red Lake, Minn,
THE POSTOFFICE STORE
Staple and Fancy Groceries, Dry Goods. Shoes, Etc.
We Are Membei of the Red Lake Tribe of Indians
and Solicit a Share of Yonr Business
mrsmeaaiasimmaimimimumaumimKSS JMa^m^um
ANTOINE BLUE
REDBY. MINN.
Fruit, Confectionery, Cigars.
Tobacco and Soft Drinks
CLUB ROOM
A. KAISER
Cashier
$

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