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Red Lake news. [volume] (Red Lake, Minn.) 1912-1921, January 01, 1919, Image 2

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90059061/1919-01-01/ed-1/seq-2/

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RED LAKE NEWS
A newspaper devoted to the interests of
the Red Lake Chippewa Indians.
MONTHLY SEPT. 1, TO JULY 15.
Subscription 75c a year
Entered as second class matter Septem
ber 1, 1912, at the postoffice at Red Lake,
Minn., under the act of March 3, 1879.
Address all communications to
RED LAKE NEWS
Red Lake, Minn.
We read of the sensational gifts of various per
sons to the Red Cross. We hear of one Indian
woman in a Red Cross drive gathering who held
up her hand in answer to the call for subscriptions
indicating by her fingers that she would give five,
and of her indignation when she learned that her
name had been placed upon the subscription list for
95.00 when she meant $500. We are not criticizing
the spirit of the donor but in our capacity of re
porting current topics, the Red Lake Indian Reser
vation people have* been 100 per cent loyal in every
effort on the part of our government to win the
war. They have gone over the top in every Liberty
Loan and Red Cross drive and in some instances
especially the second, third and fourth bond sales,
they went 100 per cent over their allotment. We
raised $600 one time at a Red Cross auction, selling
cakes and pies and sewing, mostly the work of
Indian women. In all the patriotic meetings held
at the Agency several long haired Indians occupy
seats of honor and the addresses had to be inter
preted. There is an America First Society at Red
Lake and all the officers are Indians. Various
Indian farmers' clubs, unsolicited, have made col
lections at their meetings and turned them over
to the Red Cross secretary. The Little Rock
Farmers Club was the first to set the example and
it was followed by the various clubs throughout the
reservation. The Indians of the Cross Lake district
have contributed liberally. The contributions come
unsolicited and indicate the trend of the Indians'
thought in supporting the government. The fact
that these donations have been for the Red Cross
is an evidence of a change of heart, if we are still
inclined to accept the idea that the original Amer
icans are savages with no sense of right, justice
or mercy. The membership of the Red Lake Red
Cross Auxiliary to the Bemidji chapter is largely
Indian and they have devoted a great deal of time
to knitting and sewing. They have turned out
approximately the following. 105 sweaters, 60
pairs of socks, 3 helmets, 12 pairs wristlets, 6
surgeons' gowns, 12 convalescent robes. Not only
have the Red Lake Chippewas supported the gov
ernment by donations, but they have joined the
army of American white citizens food conserva
tion. They were governed and abided by the same
rules and regulations and without one murmur of
dissatisfaction. During our last Indian fair we had
all kinds of bread substitutes on exhibition made by
Indian women. The crop seasons of 1917 and 1918
showed a material increase in war garden acreage.
We had a failure of crops here in 1917, but never
theless this past year showed increased acreage
planted and increased production over other years
For the first time in history a carload of wheat
was shipped from the reservation this fall. A com
mendable number of our young men joined the
army and they are coming back now with prefixes
differing from that of private. Our people are
not seeking any special distinction but when it is
understood that the Red Lake Indian boys were
exempt from draft under the law there can be no
charge of disloyalty. Every Indian that went from
Red Lake was a volunteer in every sense.
THE PROHIBITION AMENDMENT
SHOULD BE RATIFIED
In the interest of our homes.
In the interest of capital and labor.
In the interest of clean politics and a strong
nation.
ANNOUNCEMENTS PERTAINING
TO SERVICE AND REGULATION
(Continued from Page 1)
ously marked on the outside thereof but no such
birds shall be transported from any state, territory
or district to or through another state, territory
or district, or to or through a province of the Do
minion of Canada contrary to the laws of the state,
territory or district, or province of the Dominion
of Canada in which they were taken or from which
they are transported nor shall any such birds be
transported into any state, territory or district from
another state, territory or district, or from any
state territory or district into any province of the
Dominion of Canada at a time when such state,
territory or district, or province of the Dominion
of Canada prohibits the possession or transporta
tion thereof.,
Regulation 8.Permit* to Propagate and Sell
Migratory Waterfowl.
Paragraph 2 of Regulation 8 is amended so as
to read as follows:
2. A person authorized by a permit issued by
the secretary may possess, Tuy sell and transport
migratory waterfowl and their increase and eggs
in any manner and at any time for propagating
purposes and migratory waterfowl, except the
birds taken under paragraph 1 of this regulation,
so possessed may be killed by him at any time, in
any manner, except that they may be killed by
shooting only during the open season for waterfowl
in the state where taken, and the unplucked car
casses and the plucked carcasses, with heads and
feet attached thereto, of the birds so killed may be
sold and transported by him in any manner and
at any time to any person for actual consumption,
or to the keeper of a hotel, restuarant, or boarding
house, retail dealer in meat or game, or a club,
for sale or service to their patrons, who may possess
such carcasses for actual consumption without a
permit, but after midnight of March 31, 1919, no
migratory waterfowl killed by shooting shall be
bought or sold unless each bird before attaining
the age of four weeks shall have had removed from
the web of one foot a portion thereof in the form
of a "V" large enough to make a permanent well
defined mark which shall be sufficient to identify
them as birds raised in domestication under a
permit.
Regulation 9.Permits to Collect Migratory
Birds for Scientific Purposes.
Regulation 9 is amended so as to read as follows:
A person may take in any manner and at any
time,, migratory birds and their nests and eggs for
scientific purposes when authorized by a permit
issued by the secretary, which permit shall be car
ried on his person when he is collecting specimens
thereunder and shall be exhibited to any person
requesting to see the same.
Application for a permit must be addressed to
the secretary of agriculture, Washington, D. C, and
must contain the following, information: Name
and address of applicant and name of state, terri
tory or district in which specimens are proposed
to be taken and the purpose for which they are
intended. Each application shall be accompanied
by certificates from two well-known ornithologists
that the applicant is a fit person to be entrusted
with a permit.
The permit will authorize the holder thereof to
possess, buy, sell and transport in any manner and
at any time migratory birds, parts thereof, and
their nests and eggs for scientific purposes. Public
museums, zoological parks and societies, and trans
port in any manner and at any time migratory birds
and parts thereof, and their nests and eggs for
scientific purposes without a permit, but no speci
mens shall be taken without a permit. The plumage
and skins of migratory game birds legally taken
may be possessed and transported by a person with
out a permit.
A taxidermist when authorized by a permit issued
by the secretary may possess, buy, sell and trans
port in any manner and at any time migratory birds
and parts thereof legally taken.
Permits shall be valid only during the calendar
year of issue, shall not be transferable, and shall
be revocable in the discretion of the secretary. A
By the President:
ROBERT LANSING, Secretary of State.
X$\
PEYOTE
The introduction of peyote into
this reservation and its use within
the reservation is forbidden by law
under penalty of imprisonment for
not less than 30 days. A reward of
$5.00 will be paid to the party or
parties furnishing information lead'
ing to the conviction of any violator
of the above law.
L. P. ECKSTRUM
Plumbing, Steam and
Hot Water Heating
Phones 555 and 309
320 Beltrami Ave., Bemidji, Minn.
person holding a permit shall report to the secretary
on or before January 10 following its expiration
the number of skins, nests or eggs of each species
collected, bought, sold or transported.
Every package in which migratory birds or their
nests or eggs are transported shall have clearly
and conspicuously marked on the outside thereof
the name and address of the sender, the number of
the permit in every case when a permit is required,
the name and address of the consignee, a statement
that it contains specimens of birds, their nests or
eggs for scientific purposes, and, whenever such a
package is transported or offered for transportation
from the Dominion of Canada into the United
States or from the United States into the Dominion
of Canada, an accurate statement of the contents.
Regulation 11.Sale of Migratory Game Bird*
Lawfully Held in Cold Storage July 31, 1918.
An additional regulation to be known as Regu
lation 11 shall read as follows:
A person authorized by a permit issued by the
secretary may possess and may sell and transport
until midnight of March 31, 1919, the carcasses
of migratory game birds lawfully killed and by
him lawfully held in cold storage on July 31, 1918,
to any person for actual consumption, or to the
keeper of a hotel, restaurant, or boarding house,
letail dealer in meat or game, or a club, for sale
or service to their patrons, who may possess such
carcasses for actual consumption without a permit
until midnight of April 5, 1919.
Regulation 12.State Laws for the Protection
of Migratory Birds.
An additional regulation to be known as Regula
tion 12 shall read as follows:
Nothing in these regulations shall be construed
to permit the taking, possession, sale, purchase, or
transportation of migratory birds, their nests and
eggs contrary to the laws and regulations of any
state, territory or district made for the purpose of
giving further protection of migratory birds, their
nests and eggs when such laws and regulations are
not inconsistent with the convention between the
United States and Great Britain for the protection
of migratory birds concluded August 16, 1916, or
the migratory bird treaty act and do not extend
the open seasons for such birds beyond the dates
prescribed by these regulations.
Now, therefore, I Woodrow Wilson, President
of the United States of America, do hereby approve
and proclaim the foregoing amendatory and addi
tional regulations.
__ In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand
and caused the seal of the United States of America
to be affixed.
Done in the District of Columbia, this twenty
fifth day of October, in the year of our Lord one
thousand nine hundred and eighteen and of the
Independence of the United States of America the
one hundred and forty-third.
(Seal) WOODROW WILSON.
J**
A- i
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DEFE CT IV

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