OCR Interpretation


Warren sheaf. [volume] (Warren, Marshall County, Minn.) 1880-current, September 02, 1909, Image 2

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90059228/1909-09-02/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 2

'^yj.i^i
ABSENCE SAVES REST OF FAMILY
fledwood Warmr Beats Out the Brains
ef Own Daughter and House
keeper's ChildWent Sud
denly Insane.
Redwood Falls, Minn., Aug.
William Tibbitts, a fanner who lived
ear Delhi In this county, killed two
young girls, one his own daughter.
Then, after making an unsuccessful
attempt to burn his farmhouse and
cremate their bodies, he hurried to
his barn, and hanged himself.
The victims of the supposed maniac
were his 10-year-old daughter and Ce
oile Norton, about 18 years of age,
daughter of his housekeeper, Mrs.
Rose Norton. More lives might have
been sacrificed, but for the fact that
Mrs. Norton, who has been employed
by Tibbitts since the death of his
wife two months ago, was visiting at
her former home at St. Paul Park,
Minn. With her were the two young
est daughters of Tibbitts.
The hapless victims of the farmer
were slain with a heavy piece of iron,
either an iron stake or a long tooth
from some farm machine. No one so
far as known saw the killing. The
girls could have had no chance at
all for their lives. Everything indi
cates that their slayer struck them
from behind and crushed their skulls
at the first blow. Many blows from
the deadly weapon then followed, their
beads and upper portions of their bod
ies being out and bruised in a horrible
manner.
The girls were killed either in the
house or Just outside the door. Their
bodies were found under some hay in
the house. Tibbitts had taken hay
from the barn and covered the corpses,
then setting fire to it. His little boy
taw the smoke rushing from the build
ing and summoned the neighbors, who
arrived just in time to save the build
ing and preserve the bodies of the
lead girls from cremation.
It was when the neighbors were
bending their energies to extinguish
the flames that Tibbits ran to the barn
and completed the day's tragedies.
Tibbits was about 70 years of age
and was well thought of in tnis com
munity. The sheriff and county at
torney have started a thorough in
vestigation.
State Funeral for Eccles.
Winnipeg, Man., Aug. 31.Arrange-
ments have been completed for a state
funeral for George A. Eccles, the wire
less operator, who gave his life to
save the three hundred passengers of
the steamer Ohio, which sank in the
North Pacific Thursday night.
Drouth Grows Worse.
Reading, Pa., Aug. 31.Drouth con
dltions are worse in the Schuylkill
valley than at any previous time in
the last fifty years. Only one and a
half inches of rain has fallen in this
vicinity since July 1.
WHEAT NOT HURT BY COLD.
Reassuring Reports From the Coldest
Spots in Western Canada.
Winnipeg, Man., Aug. 31.A cold
wave swept over the Canadian north
west and damage to the uncut wheat
was looked for. However, the wires
from the districts mostly liable to
frost ticked off the intelligence "No
damage." Yorkton registered 32 above
and Pipestone, 38 above. These were
the two coldest places. Bdmontcu
bad 50 above.
if i Bates low.
'v--/. ceiient location.
81^ugly
NORTH STAR COLLEGE
WARREN, MINN.
Fall Term Begins October 1st.
ACADEMY: Equal to High School but the course
completed in three-fourths the time.
BUSINESS. SHORTHAND and TYPEWRITING:
Courses complete, thoro, practical, up-to-date.
PREPARATORY Common school branches com
pleted. Especially for new comers who want to
learn English.
MUSIC: Piano, Organ, Pipe Organ, Voice Culture,
Class Singing, M.^^-.^.,^.**:.-
AGRICULTURE: Practical Agricultural stulie^anl
4 experiments. -mWW:IMS^^M
DOMESTIC ECONOMY: Dresmaking, Sewing,
Needle-work, Cooking, Household Economics.
Found Insane and Ordered to Asylum.
If She Should
Recover.
Barnum, Minn., Aug. 81.Mrs. Fred
Young, aged 22, wife of a farmer re
siding about five miles southeast of
here, while her husband was on his
way to town with a load of cre?: a*"'
milk, threw her three ohildr^. *p#d
one, three and five years, into a depp
well, set fire to the barn, destroying
it, and also set fire to the house.
Failing in her effort to burn the
building, she took a dose of paris
green and then easTiPfl her throat
several times with i knife, making
wounds, but failing to sever the
Jugular vein.
Mrs. Young was taken to the sher
iff's residence at Carlton and a special
meeting of the insanity board was
held at once. The woman was found
to be insane and ordered committed
to the state insane asylum, In case
she recovers. In the meantime, she
was ordered taken to a hospital at
Cloquet. Her condition is serious.
The physicians, however, believe that
she may recover.
Mrs. Young has been in poor health
for the past two years and it is said
she had threatened several times to
kill her children and herself. Her
father committed suicide several
years ago.
NO DESIGNS ON THE U. S.
Canadian Pacific Road Will Not Build
to Puget Sound.
Seattle, Wash., Aug. 31.D. Mc
Nicholl, vice-president of the Canadian
Pacific railway, says his company has
no intention of building a line to
Puget sound as long as the present
tariff agreement with the Northern
Pacific proves profitable.
Mr. McNichol said it is the policv
it his road to develop Canadian terri
tory and not to invade the United
States. He said that while the Cana
iian Pacific secured entrance into Chi
sago over the Wisconsin Central, the
latter is an independent road. He al
so said he knew nothing of the myste
rious north coast road now building
west from Spokane, and that as far as
he knows, it has no connection with
his company.
.CUMMINS NOT COMING.
Iowa Senator Wires That He Can Not
Accept Invitation.
St. Paul, Aug. 31.Senator Cum
mins of Iowa will not be the chief
speaker at the proposed demonstra
tion to be held in St. Paul in honor
of the Minnesota congressmen who
voted against the tariff bill.
Although it has not been decided
whether the ratification meeting will
be held or not, Senator Cummins was
wired in regard to an PceppHnce of
an invitation from Hugh Halbert of
St. Paul.
It was given out that the senator
would accept the invitation, but later
Tarns Blxby received a telegram to
the effect that Senator Cummins could
not accept the invitation under any
circumstances, as an engagement in
Southern Iowa on the day following
the proposed date in St. Paul would
prevent it.
New P. R. Secretary.
San Juan, P. R., Aug. 31.George
Cabot Ward, auditor of Porto Rico,
has been appointed secretary of Porto
Rico to succeed William F. Willough
by, who has been elected.president of
the executive council.
Jap Visitors Coming.'
Seattle, Aug. 31.The Great North
ern steamer Minnesota, carrying Bar
on Shibusawa and the other Japanese
commissioners to the United States,
was reported by wireless 800 miles at
Boarding club for students,, ^Ex-
Catalog and information free.
W1| W
i
GLENN CURTISS WINS INTERNA-
TIONAL CUP OF AVIATION.
AT RHEIMS.
BEATS BOTH BLERI0TAND LATHAM
Flies 12.42 Miles In 15 Minutes, SO 3-5
Seconds, Record'Time.Mrs. Roose
velt and Ambassador White
Among the Spectators.
Bethany Aviation Field, Rheims,
Aug. 30.The International cup of
aviation, known also as .the James
Gordon Bennett trophy, was won by
Glenn H. Curtiss, the American avia
tor, in the fastest aerial journel of 20
kilometers (12.42 miles) ever accomp
lished by man. His time, 15 minutes
50 3-5 seconds, was made only 5 3-5
seconds faster than that made by Ble
riot over the same course. The other
two pilots who represented Prance,
Latham and Lefevre, finished respec
tively in 17 minutes 32 seconds, and
20 minutes 47 3-5 seconds.
Cockburn, an Englishman, ran into
a haystack as he was maneuvering for
the start, and did not cross the line.
Several other machines, which were
expected to start, were not ready with
in the time limit.
The race lay between Bleriot and
Curtiss, with Latham as a possible
outsider. Lefevre on previous per
formances apparently had no chance.
Fortune favored the American, An
accident two days ago to Bleriot's fast
machine was a serious handicap, since
he had no opportunity to try out the
repaired machine..
Curtiss stole a march on his rivals
by getting away early. Finding condi
tions favorable at 10 o'clock in the
morning he decided to take no
chances in the fickle weather, and
after a trial trip, in which he made
the circuit of the course in 7 minutes,
55 1-5 seconds, lowering the world's
record 9 seconds, he started imme
diately on his attempt to win the cup.
Still Startles Frenchmen.
He handled his machine, which flew
along at a speed never before wit
nessed, in masterly style, especially at
the turns which he took on the down
grade. The first round, measuring
6.21 miles, was made in 7 minutes 57
2-5 seconds, somewhat slower than the
trial time, but the second round was
covered two seconds faster, 7 minutes
53 1-5 seconds, another world's rec-*
ord.
This remarkable showing on the
part of the American created conster
nation in the Bleriot camp. The
French favorite, whose machine was
equipped with a four-bladed propeller,
made a trial, but could do no better
than 7 minutes 58 1-5 seconds, for
the round. Then upon the advice of
Santos-Dumont, he substituted a two
bladed propeller, but this proved slow
er still, and the French beg&a to
doubt the ability of their champion.
Eleriot replaced the original propel
ler and tinkered with his machine for
several hours. In the meantime Le
fevre in a Wright biplane, but with
out hope of winning, flew over the
course, but his time was five minutes
slower than that of Curtiss.
The excitement grew steadily as 5
o'clock, which the public understood
was the time limit for starting In this
event, approached, 'Bleriot's and
Latham's machines were run out and
everybody stood watch in hand.
At 5 o'clock the crowds concluded
that the two French champions had
defaulted and a murmur of protest
arose, but a minute later it was offi
cially announced that the wording of
the rule had been misunderstood and
that the rule allowed a ^start to 'e
made any time before half past live
o'clock.
A few minutes later Bleriot and
Latham crossed the line in quick suc
cession. Bleriot went by the tri
bunes at a terrific pace and for a
moment the Americans feared Curtiss
would be beaten. He finished the
round in almost the Identical time of
Curtiss* fasc lap, covering the ten
kilometers in 7 minutes 53 3-5 sec
onds, but his speed seemed appre
ciably to decrease on the last round,
and before he reached the final turn
the stop watches showed that he had
lost. The French crowds were great
ly disappointed at the failure of their
countryman, but largely owing to the
popularity of the Wrights in France
and the general French recognition of
the wonderful stimulus Americans
have given to the science of aviation,
no foreign, victory could have been
so popular as that of an American.
The judges immediately ran up the
American flag on the signal pole on
the timekeepers' stand in front of the
tribunes and the bands played the
"Star Spangled Banner." There was
great rejoicing among .the American
spectators. ,,w-.
Mrs. Roosevelt Present.
Ambassador Henry White, accom
panied by Mrs. Theodore Roosevelt,
Miss Ethel Roosevelt, Quentin and
Archie, had arrived in time to witness
the flights by Bleriot and Latham
from a special box placed at the dis
posal of the party.
Curtiss Wins Again.
A twilight vision of Paulham's
graceful monoplane, like a great
white bird soaring above the plain,
so high that it seemed to rise above
the yellow harvest moon just peeping
above'' the distant bills, and the fleet
ing "Golden,Flier," aa tke Curtiss
WARREN SHEAF, WARREN, MINN., THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER, 2, 19091
DOCTORS
consamptipn
Nature *lon cured,
do it, it
-tiPFREE
can be]
te won'tI
SCO IT'S EMULSION
but its.
miut be xontimied
tgPFREE
turn
mer i well as winter.
Tak* It In* littlecold milkori
Gctaanllbottki ABDnmWil
Sewing Machine
runs lighter than any
other.
6*TREE
lasts longer than any
other.
tSPFREE
ismore beautiful than
any other.
-tiPFREG
has less vibration
than any other.
-tiPFREE
is easier to operate
than any other.
-tiPFREE
makes a more perfect
stitch than any other.
is the test of all com
bined in one.
FREE SEWING MACHINE GO.
CHICAGO ILLINOIS
LOCAL AGENTS WANTED EVERY
WHERE.
TORNELL'S RESTAURANT.
Warren, Minn.
Meals and lunches served at all
hours.
Farmers and transients, call at my
place and enjoy a good, wann meal
while in the city.
A good place to have your Sunday
dinners.
..-'^W
tMt e* fc*^
it
ipv-ti
The
IS II
Hi
Can (tirnisBL yotilLwith the
7iJj.fi if v'Jwi
Visiting CardsI
Announcements and
Initial ptattonery.
ROYAL TYPEWRITER BUILDING
THRESHING
SEASON
Is the most important time of the year.
When rain delays the work day after day the
farmers get worried. We are trying to help
both the threshers and the farmers by keeping
machines on hand. We have a few second
hand rigs ready to go into the field.
One 18 horse power Pitts engine
One 18 horse power Advance engine.
One 16 horse power Pitts engine.
One 14 horse power Pitts engine.
One 36 inch cylinder Niagara Separator.
One 4 0 inch cylinder Advande Separator.
One complete, new International, 2 0 horse power
Gasoline outfit, $1800.00.
We can rig you up in two hours time with
i'JS steam rig for $1000 to $1500.1 3
Full Lrhne
R'&^-i*^
ROYAL
Standard Typewriter
i:iVi?$-!fTp
i
LUNDGREN, WITTENSTEN
:#atist
M^:miti^0m
$65.06
THE ACKNOWLEDGED STANDARD OF TO-DAY.
Will turn out more neat, perfectly aligned work, with
less effort and with less wear on its working parte
than any other typewriter made.
YOU CAN PAY MORE BUT YOU CANNOT BUY MORE.
Royal Typewriter Co*
412 Second Ave 80., Minneapolis, Minn.
&9M
fn
t-':/.',Hi ?r .j^...V?9.--,- I...-
*$$$$%''-
^m
NEW YORK
*ft

xml | txt