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The great West. [volume] (St. Paul, Minn.) 1889-18??, August 01, 1890, Image 7

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A Forccone Conclusion.
Husband—What are you going to do,
Mary?
Wife—l am going to drive a nail into the
wall on which to hang this picture.
Husband—That is to say, you are going
to put your thumb up at auction.
Wife—At auction?
Husband— Yes; or in other words, your
thumb is to come under the hammer.—
Boston Courier.
Game Birds.
Jinks—Waiter, bring me a gun!
"Waiter —One gun for one. Powder and
•hot for two.—Munsey’s Weekly.
Not for Flies.
A patrolman whose beat is in the “Kain
tuck” district passed a house the other
day where a fly screen in the front win
dow did not fill the space by at least three
inches on the side, and calling to a woman
in the yard he asked:
“Madam, was that fly screen placed in
the window to keep out flies?”
“Flies?” she repeated, in a tone of con
tempt. “No, sah Dat screen is in dar to
keep out robbers, an’ de feller who
squeezes in has got to be powerful lean an’
thin.”—Detroit Free Press.
A Gratifying Indorsement.
“John, Charles, William!” cried the boys’
mother, “where are those peaches I left
here?”
“In our midst,” returned the boys, and
when the doctor called that night the
mother knew that her little darlings had
spoken truthfully as well as with a gram
matical accuracy that is not universal.—
New York Sun.
He Was Frightened.
“Ob, no, let’s not go!”, exclaimed the
little boy as his nurse proposed going on
board a yacht, and then the youngster
burst into tears.
“Why, Willie, what in the world is the
matter?”
“I just h-h-heard one m-m-raan tell an
other to set the s-s-spanker.”—Providence
Journal.
Ilis Utile Scheme,
Cholly—Fweddy, old boy, what’s this I
heah? Have you weally and twuly been
sued by a nalisty bahbah fob a shaving
bill?
Fweddy—Don’t you fwet, ole chappie. A
lot of beastly cads, you know, say I cawn’t
waise a beahd. Bah Jove, they’ve got to
take it back now! —Chicago Tribune.
Kindness to the Canary.
“The canary seems to be uneasy, ” said
the young man.
“Yes,” replied the young lady, “He al
ways acts that way if the room isn’t —er—
dark after 11 o’clock.”
Young Mr. Hankinson considerately
turned the light down and staid an hour
or two longer.—Chicago Times.
A Matter for Congratulation,
“Ah, Mr. Lammee, allow me to congrat
ulate you. Your son I understand is en
gaged, and to a very fine lady.”
“Fine! Magnificent! And he loves her
devotedly. She’s worth 5100,000, but Adolph
is that fond of her I believe he would have
taken her if she wasn’t worth more than
$90,000.” —Fliegcnde Blaetter.
Wanted It Natural.
A man, with a head as destitute of hair
as a watermelon, entered a druggist’s and
said he wanted a bottle of hair restorer.
“What kind of hair restorer do you pre
fer?”
“I’ll take a bottle of red hair restorer.
That was the color of my hair when I was
a boy.”—Judy.
A Delicate Suggestion,
“I think these kissing games are such
foolish things,” he said, petulantly, as they
left the children’s party and strolled out on
the lawn.
“Yes,” she answered, “kissing is always
very foolish when anyone is looking on.”—
New York Herald.
A Pleasant Composition,
Maid (to mistress, who is going abroad)
—Shall I put any music in the trunk for
your state room?
Mistress (thinking of mal de mer) —Yes,
put in that composition by Heave, “When
the Swallows Upward Fly.”—Cincinnati
Commercial.
A Mutter on Economy.
Travers How mucli are these fancy
vests?
-Gl2, sir.
Clorl:-
Travers—Then just let me have a dress
tie. I will skip the afternoon tea and take
in the evening reception.—Clothier and
Furnisher.
Not Necessarily.
“Glad to make your acquaintance, Mr.
Valentine. I suppose—ha! ha! —you were
born on St. Valentine’s day.”
“That doesn’t follow—any more than
that you were born on the Ist day of April,
sir.”—Chicago Tribune.
Only One Hitch.
Will—Did everything go off smoothly at
your marriage, Bill?
Bill—Yes, there was only one hitch.
Will—Ah, what was that?
Bill —The tying of the knot, of course.—
Yankee Blade.
Under False Colors.
Robinson—Did you see Travers yester
day? I met him on the street and he look
ed too shabby for any use.
Jagway—Yes. He told me he was going
to call on his doctor.—Clothier and Fur
nisher.
Physician—What in the name of good
ness are you doing in that bath tub? Why,
man, you’ll kill yourself.
“But didn’t you tell me to take the pills
in water?” —Fliegende Blaetter.
Bhe Holds the Pan* Strings.
Will—You have a treasure in your wife,
Bill.
Bill—l have more than that. I have a
treasurer.—Yankee Blade.
Literal.
'.v. *»» : - &T,
A FARMERS’ MANIFESTO.
A Financial Scheme Brought Befoit Con
gress — Extracts from the Preamble.
Mr. McClammy, of North Carolina, is
one of the half dozen farmer congress
men of this house. He is a zealous Alli
ance man. Recently he gave evidence of
that zeal by introducing and indorsing
the most remarkable financial scheme
yet brought before congress. This meas
ure provides “for the issuing of legal
tenders based on the lands of the United
States and the allotment of the same.’*
The proposition is that the government
shall issue legal tender notes to the
amount of S3O for each man, woman
and child in the country. The money
is to be turned over to the states in pro
portion to the'population, and the states
are to loan it at 1 per cent, upon real es
tate only. Counties and townships are
to have their shares, apportioned accord
ing to the number of inhabitants. The
interest derived from the 1 per cent, will
go to the school funds. No loan is to
exceed $2,500.
In presenting this bill Farmer Mc-
Clammy stated to the house that it was
“indorsed by every Fanners’ Alliance in
the country.” After declaring .that the
land is full security for this issue of legal
tenders the preamble proceeds:
“When this parental government of
ours considered its dignity insulted, and
called on its children to surrender to the
parent the dearest of all earthly posses
sions, liberty and life, with child like
obedience the people went at the parent’s
call; for the time being they gave up
their liberty, they endured privations,
suffered discomforts such as only the
soldier knows, and thousands of the peo
ple, from Bunker Hill to the last Indian
campaign, lost limb or life to save the
parent, the government. These patriotic
children yearned for wealth, for the com
forts and joys of home, but they loved
the government more than all these,
more than life; surely, then, whatever
we have, all that we are, we owe to the
people.
“Thousands of our people cannot find
employment; millions are working for a
bare pittance on field or farm, in factory
or mine; the mothers of the sons of the
republic are stitching, starving in our
city garrets; the sturdy farmer, who in
the past has been our boast, comes to
congress in person and petition telling
his sufferings, his lasses, how, work
ever so hard, yet he cannot save the
home where his children were born; our
sisters, wives and mothers by petition
appeal to you to aid them; they, too,
have economized at every turn; they
have for years known not of luxury; for
other years want has stared them in the
face, and we ask of you, our representa
tives. who is benefited by all this suffer
ing and want?
“We beg of you on your return .home
to visit, not your wealthy friends in the
cities, but instead go rather to the house
of the honest laborer, who has but little
food, and that the poorest, to give his
little ones: we beg of you to go among
the farmers, not among those who are
known as *lO per cents,’ who grind the
poor even worse than the shylocks; we
ask of you to go among those that toil in
factory, farm or mine, not those who
live on others' toil, and then say who is
benefited by all the want and misery
you will have seen. The shylock may
accumulate more property, but will lie
be benefited thereby?
“As individuals, by brooding over
wrongs, grow insane, so donations. Let
France during her revolution illustrate
the case. "Shylocks will not be benefited
if Anarchists are evolved by all this suf
fering and want.
“Armies have never and will never
hold in abeyance the red hand when the
people grow infuriated and insane. The
farmer, the laborer, our wives and
mothers appeal to you to aid us while yet
you may. We have in the past shown
our devotion to the government; we ask
that the government shall now show
the same devotion to us; that you shall
extend the same aid to us that we have
in the past extended to the government.
In 1774 and 1775 our then parent govern
ment heeded not our prayers, our peti
tions. Will you not profit by their mis
takes?
“We come to you with the best se
curity that God has given us, a security
that needs no custodian —our lands —and
ask you to give us a currency based on
these lands, and that the currency so
given shall be a legal tender for public
and private dues. We ask of you to is
sue us currency to supply our needs, and
we offer $35,000,000,000 real taxable se
curity. But as individual indorsers we
propose to secure the state school fund
by $5,000,000,000 real property. If this
country’ really belong* to the people
then we Jisk that the amount provided
for be divided pro rata to the states for
the people, for their use and benefit.
“Of late we, the people, have heard
much of the constitution. We ask you
who made it—did congress or the people?
Is the created superior to the creator?
But why this unusual love? On the one
hand in 1860 this love, this devotion did
not prevent very many from doing what
they thought was best for their people
but unheard of in the constitution.” —
Washington Letter.
Federate, Federate.
Readers will recall the proposed co
operation between the farmers’ and la
bor organizations in Illinois. The result
of the convention made up of delegates
from such organizations is set forth in
the following resolutions:
We, the representatives of the agri
cultural and labor organizations of the
state of Illinois, in conference met, ex
press ourselves in unmistakable terms
that our future success and welfare must
depend on concerted action, and that we
recommend to the different organizations
as their representatives that steps should
be token as speedily as possible to ac
complish a consolidation or confedera
tion of the same.—Grange Bulletin.
A Jefferson City special to The Kansas
City Times says: “It looks very much as
though the farmers of Missouri are about
to have their innings: they are playing a
big hand in politics, and from present in
dications there will be a great many
farmers in the next legislature.”
W. J. DYER & BRO.
The Oldest, Largest, and Most Reliable Music House in the Northwest.
148 and 150 East Third St.
ST. PAUL.
Instruments Sold on Easy Payments at Cash Prices.
509 and 511 Nicollet Ave.,
MINNEAPOLIS.
EVERY INSTRUMENT FULLY WARRANTED.
Bargains in Good Second-hand Pianos and Organs
Books, and all kinsd of
MUSICAL INSTRUMEITTS.
SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE ETC., FREE.
THE ALLIANCE ELEVATOR CO.
H. L. LOUCKS, President.
Business Agent uf Minnesota State Farmers' AWance.
RECEIVERS AND SHIPPERS OiT
WHEAT, OATS, CORN, BARLEY, FLAX-SEED AND HAY.
LIBERAL ADVANCES MADE ON CONSIGNMENTS.
This Company is organized on the co-operative plan by the farmers of
Dakota and Minnesota, for the purpose of handling our own wheat and
furnishing our unrivaled hard wheat in its purity to the mills, direct from
their own elevators.
CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED
18 & 'iq Chamber of Commerce, Minneapolis, Minn.
“The Book of the Epoch. A Wonderfully Fascinating Work.”
* C/ESAR’S
A STORY OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY.
BY EDMUND BOISGILBERT, M. D
ONE of the most startling; and original works ever written. The Author, a man of wealth and
high social position, aud who writes under a nom de plume, presents, in a startingly original
and wonderfully fascinating work of fiction, a profound study of sociological conditions, and
he follows these conditions out to what he believes will tie their inevitable result. The events
described in the story takes place in the year 1!>88. and is laid in New York City. The plot is diversi
fied and full of human interest. Some of the chapters are equaled onlv by Victor Hugo in terseness
and vividness of description. The effect of ihe book as a whole is such that the reader will scarcely
know in which character most to admire the gifted author—whether as a novelist skillfully weaving
a complicated plot into a harmonious story; as a poet deftly touching the chords of the great heart
of humanity; as a philosopher analyzing the errors and laying bare the evil tendencies of our age ;
as a prophet warning the race against the greed aud selfishness whieh are eating away the founda
tions of society ; as a preacher teaching the broad principals of divine charity and appealing to
those who have thepower and the good will to redeem the world.
“A wonderfully fascinating hook. * * * “To say the least, it lias the merits of Start-
Will hold the attention of tlie world as no other ling originality.”—Louisville Times.
book has held it for years.”—Chicago Saturday
Blade.
“I was unableto lay it down until I had finished vehemence and force of the necessity of guarding
reading it. It should be read by every farmer in our liberties against the encroachments of mon
the laud.”—H. L. I.OUCKS, President National opoly and plutocracy, and of disarming corrup-
Farmers’ Alliance. tion in government by every device that a vigi-
‘•That our people in this country needs orous- lit I ! t,^,2 '''’; v . c ?;“ v’ I’. 1 ’ . ~P, E ° KGE CARY
in S is unquestionably true, and yon have EGGELSTON in New York World,
brought forward a Gabriel’s trump.”—FßAN- ‘‘Powerful in Ihe extreme. The effect of an
CIS E. WILLARD. honest purpose is felt in every line.” —St. Paul
“Bellamy looks backward upon what is iinpos- * ioneer Press,
sible as well as improbable. “Caesar’s Column” “The story Is most interestingly devised and
looks forwards to what is not only possible, but strongiy told. It is not the work of a pessimist
probable.”—MlLTON GEORGE, Founder of the or an anarchist, but rather of a preacher who
Farmers’ Alliance. sees the dangers that all thoughtful men see in
_ , . _ _ , , . . , our time, and, appreciating the importance
“I have read ‘Cresars Column twice and am |q humanity of mantaining what is good in
convinced thnt it has been written in the nick of existing systems, utters his warning as a sacred
time. * * * I predict for the book an immense duty.”-Detroit Free Press,
sale and a world-wide discussion. —CORINNE S.
BROWN, Secretary Nationalist Club, Chicago. “The author of ‘Caesar’s Column’ tvhoever he
“Peculiarly timely at the present time, and be, is a writer of force and ability.”-Toledo
should have a wide reading among thinking peo- .. W)llleI find in it evidences of great literary
pie. B. O. FLOW LR, Editor of the Arena, Bos- ability abounding, as it does in great wealth of
ton - imagery and vividness of detail, candor compels
“Intense, stirring and eloquent. No such book me to write that much of thesubstance of the book
has ever appeared In the annals of literature, is somewhat improbable. Nevertheless, as an
Its story is here and there brightened by the example of high literary form the book deserves
sweetness of a pure love, but the general tone is unrestricted praise.—J. CARDINAL GIBBONS,
one which should make every honest heart shiver ..
for the future. The truth peers from every page. ‘ It;.^tain ly a very extraordinary produc-
No man will read this book without a new sense tlon. ARCHBISHOP POTIER of New York,
of duty and responsibility to his country.”—The “A much more powerful book than Mr. Bellamy
Great W’est. has produced.’’—Kausas City Times.
One Volume, post octavo, 367 pages, bound in extra vellum cloth, sl.lO.
Paper bound Edition, 50 cents-
By special arrangement with the publishers, this wonderful book, may be ordered direct through
us. It will be sent by mail to any address, securely wrapped, and postage prepaid, on receipt of
price. Address,
FISH & FRAIN, 758 WABASHA ST„ ST. PAUL.
HAVE YOU READ IT?
THE GREAT BOOK OF THE CENTURY!
“LOOKING backward;
BY EDWARD BELLAMY.
Paper lEcLxtjxoxx
The GREAT. WEST will send this wonderfully interesting
work to any one who will send 50 cents. We
Farmers and Everyone
CONTEMPLATING THE PURCHASE OF A
PIANO I ORGAN
SHOULD CORRESPOND WITH
* COLUMN *
“Tlie book points out tendencies which actually
exists and are in need of cure. It warns us with
will pay the postage.
Kemper’s Potato Bug
ZEj3zt3ex*xrx±rxaitiox*.
This machine will exterminate the bugs
as fast as you can walk between the rows. 11l
uses a mixture of water and Paris Green,
which is kept continually in motion in the
can. Two pails of water and its Paris Green
will sprinkle 1000 feet thoroughly. Each
machine #4.50. Send orders to
THEO. MICHEL & CO.,
Hardware Dealers and Manufacturers.
751 Wabasha St., - ST. PAUL, MINN
Sheet Music, Music
50 cents
HAIL, TORNADO AND CYCLONE INSURANCE.
THE
I 1 HHIHIilll!!!l^[
I • Alliance * Storm * Association. * 1
3Aii!!!lllliSEi , iiPilOEitlli)liin!i!ill{Jf!lil!lill!lllilll!U!il!i!llllIliniUllfl!lllfl!lilKil!![l)fl!HI«llllllHt!lil!liUIHIflllRHilhIIII!il)IBHIIiilfli!niitil!lilitUIIIWlilllG!llllltHl:i liHllllllillllllllllllllllllllilll
The Minnesota Alliance Storm Association, organized April 21st, 1890,
is now in the field ready to insure crops against loss or damage from Hail;
and detached farm buildings against loss or damage from Cyclones.
This Company is made up exclusively of members of the Alliance and
practical farmers.
Its officers are as follows:
President.— David P. Listek Lac qui Parle, Minn.
Vice President.— Harvey E. Cooke Crookston, “
Secretary.— Robert Eckford iDexter,
Treasurer.— H. P. Bjorge, (Treas. of the State Alliance)..Underwood,
Its Board of Managers is as follows:
David P. Lister
Harvey E. Cooke...
Robert Eckford....
H. P. Bjorge
Hamlin V. Poore...
A. L. Stromberg. ..
Ignatius Donnelly
John Lathrop
Henry Plowman.
Seth Bottomley.
Hans B. Imsdahl.
Lac qui Parle, Minn..
Crookston, “
Dexter, “
....Underwood, “
....Bird Island, “
...Forest Lake, “
Hastings, “•
Dawson, u
Luce, “•
Nashville ('enter, “•
Big Woods, “
- GENERAL DEPOSITORY-GERMANIA BANK' OF ST. PAUL. -
Among these gentlemen, out of eleven managers, six are members of the
Executive Committee of the State Farmers’ Alliance; the President of the
Association is Vice President of the State Farmers’ Alliance, and the Sec
retary was the former Superintendent of Insurance of the State Alliance.
AGENTS ARE WANTED IN EVERY COUNTY IN THE STETE.
Apply to the Secretary, Robert Eckford, No. 758 Wabasha St., St. Paul,
Minn.
We promise the farmers honest treatment, an economical administration
and prompt settlement of all losses. A full report of this Association will
be made to the State Alliance at each Annual Meeting.
David P. Lister,
President.
Robert Eckford,
Secretary.
DR. BRINLEY.
VANDERBURG BIjOCK, Hennepin Avenue,
corner Fourth Street,
MINNEAPOLIS, MINN.
Regularly graduated and legally qualified;
long engaged in Chronic, Nervous and Skin Bis
eases. A friendly talk costs nothing. If incon
venient to visit the city for treatment, medicines
sent by mail or express, free from observation.
Curable cases guaranteed. If doubt exists we
say so. Hours 10 to 12 a. in., 2to 4 and 7toß p.
m.: Sunday, 2to3p. m, If you cannot come,
state case by mail.
\ICTD\/0| IQ Organic Weakness,Failing
“■» * UU O Jieuiory, Lack of fifnergy]
• |. Physical Decay, arising
UELE3 I I I I from tniliscretion, excess
or exposures. producing some iiTTKT
Sejrßistrust. Defective Memory, l' > i r ij"}>| , "'"o7i' TK
Face, A of Ambition, Un
fit news to Dyspepsia. Stunted
Development. iTosiTTir' I povTer. 'fbiin's“'TT tKe‘Tftfno.c7
etc., are treatecT unparalleled snccess.
Privately, Speedily. ——.
BLOOD AND. SKIN a=
AFFECTING BODY. NOSE. THROAT, SKIN
AND BONE, BLOTCHES, ERUPTIONS, ACNE,
ECZEMA, OLD SORES, ULCERS, PAINFUL
SWELLINGS, from whatever cause, positively
and forever driven from the system by means of
safe, time-tested remedies. Stiff and swollen
joints and rheumatism, the result of blood poi
son, positively cured. .
KIDNEY AND URINARY
COMPAINTS.
quent or Bloody Urine, Unnatural Ois*
charges Promptly Cured, £
CATARRH, THROAT, LUNG DIS-
EASES,
Constitutional and Acquired Weakness of
both Sexes treated Successfully.
It is self evident that a physician paying par
ticular attention to a class of cases attains great
skill.
Every known application is resorted to and the
proven good remedies of all ages and countries
are used. No experiments are made.
SUPERFLUOUS HAIR PERMANENTLY
REMOVED.
FREE—Pamphlet and Chart of Questions sent
free to your address.
All consultations, either by mail or verbal, are
regarded as strictly confidential and are given
perfect privacy. DR. BRINLEY,
Minneapolis, Minn.
THE PRINCESS
STEAWBERET
Originated and grown by John C. Kramer,
La Crescent. Minn.
Has yielded 1,361 bushels per acre!
Write for circulars, as it is pronounced by
everyone acquainted with it the best, largest, and
healthiest berry in the state. Per doz. $2.00.
One hundred,slo.oo. One thousand,sßo.oo Add.
JOHN C. KRAMER. La Cresent, Minn.
TREES! TREES! TREES!
REES FOR EVERY BODY.
Good Ironclad, 2 year old Apple 1.0. 1, per 100,24 CO
Soft Jlapls 4to 01 1 ., per 100,24; Bl<> 8 f t., “ B.M
Box Elder 4tof.it., “ #4; GtoSft., " 8.00
White Ash 4to Oft., “ 24; 6to S ft., “ B.CO
Box Elder White Ash, 1 year seedling, • per 1,000, 1.25
Soft Maple, ------- “ 1.25
Box Elder White Ash, 2 years, - “ 2.50
Cathbert Rasbeiries, ----- “ 3.C0
Turner Red Rasberries, .... “ 3.0 C
. resent Seedling Strawberries, - - - “ S.OO
Mamouth Pieplant, ----- per 100, 3.00
All Sioux Falls grown. Am closing out to go to California.
£. M. WINSLOW. Sioux Falls, South Dakota
HEALTH IS WEALTH.
""" | Iwil
Db. E. C. West's Nerve and Brain Treatment.
a guaranteed speeiflc for Hysteria, Dizziness,
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ing to misery, decay and death, Premature Old
Afire, Barrenness, Loss of Power in either sex. In
voluntary Losses and Spermatorrhoea caused by
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dulgence. Each box contains one month’s treat
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$5.00, we will send thepurchaser 6nr written guar
antee to refund the money if the treatment does
not effect a cure. Guarantees issued only by
JOS. R. HOFFLIN, Druggist,
Cor, 3d St. & Ist Ave. S., Minneapolis,
FOR MEN ONLY!
HllnlilTiailfor LOOTwMIWO MANHOOD;
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CllMalLlllilof Errors or Kxaessss in Oldsr Young.
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Btrawthra WEAK, CNUICVKLOPKDOKOAKSa PARTS OF BOUT.
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For Advertising Rates apply
to J. L. Stack & Co., Nat. Gei*.
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A 1111 SpgfS
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p it»<• ip n OTR. 1 iAITT:oT)T?
According to trize of wire and mesh.
WIRE WORKS CO.,
• • MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA. • •
Ptf|f|TS Pronertv is rapidly advancing in
Vil t LHUU value. Lets in Mansfield addition
SIOO each, sold for sls down and Installments of $5
per month. No taxes and no interests. Sure to
double in a year. Send for maps and p utipulars as
to this bargain, for references or any information
about Oregon, addressHUGHES, BUOWX&CO., Portland, Or.
Dr. Warner’s celebrated
Coraline Health Corsets have
one peculiarity which pertains
only to corsets of their make.
‘ The bust retains its shape to
the end, and the corset im
parts to the wearer a well
proportioned and beautiful
figure. The corset is boned
with Coraline, a substance
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bone. Made in short, medium
and extra long waists.
There are many imitations, but you will
find “ Dr. Warner’s Coraline ” printed on
the inside of every genuine corset. They
are sold by your nearest dry goods dealer.
WARNER BROS. Mnfrs.,*
New York and Chicago.
! ft WELL
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P -DBMW j J

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