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St. Paul daily globe. [volume] (Saint Paul, Minn.) 1884-1896, February 12, 1884, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90059522/1884-02-12/ed-1/seq-4/

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THE WORTHINGTON LAND OFFICE.
Xeply cf the Register and Receiver to the
Charges of a "Globe" Correspondent.
United States Laxd Office, >
Wokthixgtox, Minn., Feb. 7, 1884. J
To the Editor of the Globe.
Dear Sir: —In your paper of the 4th inst.,
there is an article headed, "Another Steal,"
which is without signature or dates, and is
not only false, but malcious. The writer ap
pears to make general charges against the
conduct of this office, but is careful to so
word his article that no action can be sus
tained against him. We wish once for all to
make a clear statement of the whole matter,
and ask you to give it the same publicity that
you did the article mentioned.
In November, 1878, the Southern Minne
sota Railway Extension company, selected a
list of lands between ranges 28 and 33 in Mar
tin county, under the acts of July 4, and 13,
1866. Some of the lands selected, having
been covered by homestead entries at
the time the grant to the railroad
company was said to have attached, the reg
ister declined to certify that the railroad com
pany was entitled to them; but on November
27, 1878, sent the list to the general land of
fice for decision there. No answer being re
ceived to this, the railroad company in Feb
ruary, 1880, made a new selection, leaving
out the lauds which the office declined to
certify. On April 27, 18S0, the secretary of
the interior approved this second list, and
certified the lauds to the state for the benefit
of the railroad company.
During the year 1880 some parties applied
to enter some of the lands which had not
been certified; but, as they had been selected
by the railroad company in November, 1878,
and no decision had been rendered, the ap
plications were not allowed. On November
20, 1880, this office sent a list of the lands in
controversy to the general land office, and
asked for instructions regarding applications
to enter. On May 7, 1881, the general
land office sent instructions to receive al[
applications for these lands, and forward
them to him for decision. The duty of this
office was there plain. All applications must
be received, and transmitted to the general
land office. The first three applications sent
up under these instructions, were received
from Fairmont, and sent up singly in Jan
uary, 1S84. During July and August, 1881,
We received twenty-seven applications for
entries upon these lands, nearly all of which
were secured by mail, a very few applying in
person at the office; and in no case were we
made aware that other parties claimed the
land. We simply knew what our records
showed —that the lands applied for, were cov
by homestead entries on the 29th of Novem
ber, I860, when the grant to the railroad
company was said to have attached, and that
the entries were subsequently canceled, and
the laud selected by the railroad company
In November, 1878, and that that selection
had never been approved. We did not en
courage any applicant. On the contrary, we
told them that nudcr the decision of Secre
tary Sehurz, made April 5, 1879, in the ease
of Kniskern vs. Hastings & Dakota Railroad
company, (see Capp's land laws page 1S58)~,
the railroad company would eventually get
the laud.
On September 13, 1881, we, in accordance
with instructions of May 7, 1881, forwarded
to the commissioners of the general land
office, live applications for pre-emptions,
twenty applications for timber claim entries,
and two applications for homesteads, and
afterwards transmitted applications as they
were received. October 2, 1881, the com
missioners returned all of the applications,
and directed us to notify the railway com
pany of each application, and allow them
thirty days to file their objections in each
case. This was done as fast as possible in
connection with the regular business of the
offices, and on April 24, 1882, we
returned all applications to the general land
office, together with the objections of the
railroad eompauy. The whole matter then
rested for nearly a year.
On February 12, 1883, the secretary of the
interior made a decision in the case of Julia
Graham vs. Hastings &. Dakota Railroad
company, which reversed the decision of
Secretary Sehurz in the Kniskern case. On
March 10, 1883, the commissioner of the
general land office directed this office to al
low the entries for which he hell the appli
cations (naming each one specifically) sub
ject to the rights of the railroad company,
aud the rights of actual settlers. We had no
choice in the matter, but put on the entries
as directed. Here is where your correspon
dent says *'the fine lace work came in;" that
we allowed certain entries for which we had
held the applications six months or more.
At the time we received the letter dated
March 10, 1883, there was not
one of these applications in
our offiice, nor had there been one since
April 24, 1882. The applications were not
returned to us, but we were directed to allow
certain entries named, and those entries
must correspond with the applications held
by the commissioner. Subsequently, some
parties made applications for entries upon
some of the lands mentioned in the letter
of March 10, which were rejected, as we
could not allow two entries upon the same
tracts.
The parties appealed from cur decision re
jecting their applications, and their appeals
were transmitted by us to the general land
office, and in doing so, we called the atten
tion of the commissioner to the fact that the
appellants claimed to have valuable im
provement-! upon the lauds which should bo
protected, and requested that a hearing, or
investigation be ordered to establish the
rights of the parties. In two cases thus ap
pealed the commissioner has canceled entries
made under the decision of March 10, 1883
and allowed the entries of the appellant. In
the other cases, the court on Nov. 24, 1883,
dismissed the appeals for the reason that the
railroad company had appealed from his de
cision of March 10, 1883, to the secretary of
the interior, and that he could not consider
these cases, while the legality of his decision
of March 10, 18S3, was still pending.
Should the Secretary reverse the decision
of the commission, and award the lands to
the railroad company, then all of these en
tries would be cancelled. Should he sustain
the decision of March 10, 1883, then the set
tlers will be allowed a hearing and the rights
of the parties established; as the entries were
all made subject, First, To the rights of
the railroad companies: second, to the rights
of actual settlers.
The entries made upon these lands are as
follows:
Homesteads, thirty-two; timber culture, 29;
Pre-emptions twelve. Total, seventy-three
entries. All of these entries are being con
tested by the railroad company, while less
than ten are in conflict between settlers and
claimants (not twenty-five as stated by your
correspondent). We venture to say that in
no part of the state could 10,000 acres of rail
road land be thrown open for entrv and
there be a less number of contests than is
shown here.
Din the outline above, we have, we think
shown that in tne whole matter of these en
tries, we acted entirely under instructions
from the general laud office. The charge
that we instigated any parties to make ap
plications, we deny. We received them in
the same manner that other business is re
ceived, and treated all alike. No preference
was shown to anyone. At the time they were
filed, we did not attach any importance to any
of them, as under the Kniskern
decision then in force, but
very few of them could be
allowed, and this decision was not reversed
until a year andahalf after these applications
were filed.
That some of the timber culture applica
tions were made by business men, not
farmers, and residents of Martin county is
probably correct. But as the timber culture
«w does uvt retrain a i-cciitnce. it is not an
unusual circumstance for business men to
make such entries. We presume that by
careful inquiry, even in St. Paul, that von
could^flnd business men and clerks who are
holding timber claims. The charge that the
register refused to receive applications from
settlers, while at the same time he was re
ceiving them from other parties, is wholly
false. Ad applications received after May
7th, 1881, were transmitted to
the general laud office un
less a prior application had
been received fcr the same tract in which
case parties were advised to appeal and make
a full statement of their case, and in every
instance where this was done we forwarded
all of the papers and urged that that the ac
tual settler should be protected.
The whole correspondence between this of
fice and the general land offiee relative to
these applications and entries, is a matter of
record, and can be examined at any time,
and by any person.
Would it not be more mauly for your cor
respondent to make a full investigation be
fore rushing into print, and hides behind an
anonymous article.The charges against Com
missioner McFarland we do not consider
worthy of notice. He has not decided ad
versely to the settler. He simpiy decided
that he could not consider a case while the
whole matter was pending before the secre
tary of the interior on appeal, from a decis
ion rendered by him. It probably did not
require a great amount of pressure or influ
ence for him to arrive at that conclusion.
Very respectfully.
Moxs Grixageu, Register.
C. H. Smith, Receiver.
ZACH TAYLOR.
How Wk Made up His Cabinet When He
Was Chosen President — His Personal
Appearance — His First Meet
ing with Hen. Cass.
[Ben Perley Poore in Boston Budget.]
Gen. Taylor, when elected president of the
United States, was fortunate in having as a
companion, counselor and friend, Col. Wm.
Wallace Bliss, who had served as his chief of
stall in the Mexican campaign, and who be
came the husband of his favorite daughter,
Miss Bettyi Col. Bliss was the son of Capt.
Bliss, of the regular army, and after having
been reared in the state of New York he was
graduated at West Point, where he served
afterward for some years as acting professor
of mathematics. He thus acquired a peda
gogical manner and studious habits, but he
was sagacious and energetic, unacquainted
with the crooked paths of politics, and un
willing to submit to arrogant southern dicta
tion.
On his way to Washington from his Louis
iana plantation, Gen. Taylor visited Frank
fort and personally Invited Mr. John J. Crit
tenden, then governor of Kentucky, to
become his secretary of state. Gov. Critten
den, embarrassed "by the return of Henry
Clay to the senate, declined, and G-;n. Taylor
then telegraphed to Mr. John M. Clayton, of
Delaware, tendering him the position, which
that gentleman promptly accepted. The
southern whigs had selected Mr. William C.
Rives, the man who, as Mr. Webster said,
"could ride with all his personal friends in
an omnibus," but the president-elect did noT
fancy his impracticable conservatism.
Mr. Abbott Lawrence, who had contributed
largely to the expenditures during the presi
dential campaign, solicited the appointment
of secretary of the treasury, and was offered
the navy department, which he declined.
Mr. Thomas Butler King, of Georgia, had
desired this place, but Mr. Robert Tombs,
supported by Representative Stephens and
Senator Dawson, succeeded in having Mr.
George W. Crawford, of that state, appointed
secretary of war.
Mr. William M. Meredith, of Pennsylvania,
was rather forced upon General Taylor as
secretary of the treasury, by Mr. Clayton and
other whigs; not only on account of his ac
knowledged talents, but to exclude objec
tionable Pennsylvanians, among them Mr.
Josiah Randall, the man who, more than any
other, had contributed to the nomination
and election of the general. A contest be
tween Messrs. Corwin and Vinton, of Ohio,
for a seat in the cabinet, was settled by the
appointment of Mr. Thomas Ewing, of that
state, as secretary of the interior, and Mr.
Jacob Collamer, of Vermont, who had been
an unsuccessful competitor with Mr. Upham
for a seat in the senate, aud had been rec
ommended by the legislature as attorney
general was made postmaster general. |
Gen. Taylor had intended to appoint Mr.
William Ballard Pre3ton, of Virginia, as at
torney general, although several whig con
gressmen had expressed their disaporobation
of the selection. Finally, Senator A.cher, of
Virginia, called and asked if there was any
foundation to the report that his friend Pres
ton was to be made attorney general. "Yes,"
answered Gen. Taylor, "I have determined
to appoint him." "Are you aware, general,"
said the senator, "that the attorney general
must represent the government in the su
preme court'" "Of course!" responded the
general. "But do you know that he must
there meet Daniel Webster, Reverdy John
sou, and other leading lawyers?" "Certain
ly. What of that?" *'Nothing, general, ex
cept that they will make a fool of your at
torney general."
The Virginia senator then took his leave,
and the next morning the paper contained
the announcement that the president had
decided to appoint his friend, Mr. Preston,
secretary of the navy, and Reverdy Johnson
attorney general. Ridicule had secured the
desired result.
President Polk called upon Gen. Taylor
soon after his arrival at Washington, and in
vited him and Mr. Fillmore to dine at the
White house, an invitation which was ec
ccpted. Gen. Cass also called to pay his re
spects to his successful competitor, and as he
entered the room Gen. Taylor advanced,
grasped his hand, and shook it cordially.
Gen. Cass, who had not at first recognized
the president elec 1, exclaimed: "You had
the a tvantagc of mc!" "That's true," said
Gen. Taylor, "but you know the battle is
not always to the strong." "That's a fact,"
replied Gen. Cass, and then the two had a
very friendly chat. Just before Gen. Cass
left the room, a gentleman introduced him
self to him, remarking: "I was on the stump
as a Democrat, and in every state in which I
spoke you had a majority." "My good
friend," said Gen. Cass, "I am very much
obliged to you, but I wish you had stumped
in two or three states more."
Gen. Taylor was inaugurated on Monday,
March 5. He was escorted from Willard's
hotel by an imposing procession, headed by
twelve volunteer companies. The president
elect rode in an open carriage, drawn by four
gray horses, and he was joined at the Irving
house by President Polk, who sat at his right
hand. One hundred young gentlemen, resi
dents of the District of Columbia, formed a
body guard, and kept the crowd from press
ing around the president's carriage. Then
came the "Rough and Ready" clubs of Wash
ington, Georgotown, Alexandria, and Balti
more, with banners, badges, and music,
while the students of the Jesuits' college
brought up the rear.
The personal appearance of Gen. Taylor,'
as he read his inaugural address from a plat
form erected in front of the eastern portico
of the capitol, was not imposing. His figure
was somewhat portly and his legs were short;
his thin, gray hair was unbrushed; his
whiskers were of the military cut then pre
scribed; his features were weather bronzed
and care furrowed, and he read almost in
audibly. It was evident, however, that he
was a popular favorite, and, when he had
concluded, the vociferous cheering of the
assembled thousands was echoed by the firing
•f cannon and the. music of the bands.
Mysterious Murder in Rome.
[Rome Cor. Loudon Xews.]
Mgr. de Cesare, general of the Olivetans
of Monte Vergine, near Naples, was mur
dered here last night under circumstances
equally horrible and mysterious. He had re
turned yesterday morning from Naples to his
usual winter quarters in a house in the Via
della Purificazione, accompanied by a man
servant whom he greatly trusted. Last night
the other tenants were disturbed by stifled
cries and sounds proceeding from the mon
signor's apartment. These, however, were
soon hushed, and only a servant girl had tha
ouriosity to go down and inquire what had
happened. The man servant answered her
call with his hand bandaged and his body
smeared juith blood. The girl, terrified at the
sight, wanted to 6end for the police, but
the man servant begged her to desist, telling
her that monsignor had been surprised by
the husband of a woman he had brought into
the house, that tlu-re had liaen a row. but
THE ST. PAUL DAILY (iLOBE,|TUESDAT MOftMJSlG, FEBRUARY 12.1884.
that now the three, together with two broth
ers-in-law of the husband, were supping to
gether amicably. Nothing more was heard
that night, but next morning the girl on go
ing down stairs found the door of Mgr. de
Cesare's apartment open, and proceeding to
the man servant's room found him in bed.
He rose and went to look after his master,
saying that the guests of last night were to
have left for Naples in the morning. Mon
signor was then found lying in his bedroom
in a pool of blood, his throat and chest horri
bly gashed, and his shirt torn to shreds. In
the room adjoining the chests and cupboards
had been forced and emptied. In the dining
room were the remains of a supper. The
police were sent for immediately and the
man servant was arrested. The deceased
was 72.
WENDELL PHILLIPS' ORATORY.
His First Speech of Powerful and Elegant
Periods—A Reputation Made in a
Night.
[New York Herald.]
In the year 1837 Rev. E. P. Lovejoy, the
editor of a small journal at Alton, 111., on the
Mississppi river, opposite the Missouri shore,
a man who had advocated the abolition of
slavery, was attacked by a pro-slavery crowd,
and, while defending his printing press, was
fatally shot. Many advocates of free speech
in Boston, headed by Rev. Henry William
Channing, asked for the use of Faneuil hall
for a public meeting at which to express their
disapprobation of the occurrence at Alton.
Dr. Channing addressed a letter to the citi
zens calling the meeting, but, the request
being refused, a number of influential gentle
men met at the old court room, where there
was a mixed crowd. After Dr. Channing
had denounced the "murder of Lovejoy,"
Mr. James T. Austin, the attorney general,
spoke, comparing slaves to a menagrie of
wild beasts, and the Alton murderers to an
"orderly mob," which threw the tea over
board in Boston harbor in 1774, declared
Lovejoy a presumptuous fool, and pronounced
Dr. Channing, as a clergyman, to be mar
velously out of place.
It seemed as if the broadcloth aristocracy
of the Democratic party in Boston had won a
great victory by taking possession of an antir
slavery meeting, which, being refused a
place in Feneuil hall, had found a more
private room and had the decency to offer
freedom of speech. The clamor of the mer
chants was loud. Mr. Phillips sat quitely
among them. He was then 27 years old, an
age which to some men is an era. He was a
stranger. His name was not known, but he
went upon the stage and offered to speak.
The excited crowd would not hear him. Sud
denly and old, well-known merchant rose
and said to the crowd that this was a young
man who belonged to the family of Phillipses.
The name was a charm. Old, historical,
honored, and provincial, it gave to the young
man the compliment of quiet attention. He
at once began in a modest way to criticise
the attorney general and the crowd that had
applauded him. The crowd at once interrupted
bun, but he waited and presisted in a speech
of marvelous force, and pronounced, too, in
the most powerful and elegant periods of our
language.
"Sir," said he, "when I heard the gentle
man lay down principles which place the
murderers of Alton side by side with Otis
and Hancock, with Quincy and Adams, I
thought these pictured lips [pointing to the
portraits in the hall] would have broken into
voice to rebuke the recreant American—the
slanderer of the dead. Sir, for the senti
ments he has uttered on soil consecrated by
the prayers of puritans and blood of patriots,
the earth should have yawned and swallowed
him up."
The crowd menaced him, but he would not
desist, and he declared that he would not
take back his words. He sat down amid
great applause, carrying the resolutions which
had been offered against the murderers of
Lovejoy. Wendell Phillips' reputation was
made. He left that hall the first orator in
America. From that day he was everywhere
sought to be heard. It was Horace Greeley
who said that Wendell Phillips made men
think it was easy to be an orator. Perhaps an
easier speaker never broke into speech. His
gestures were quiet and not emphatic. He
was alwas sad and sincere. His face Was
without expression, unless it was that of
scorn. He cared little for opposition. His
oratory seemed to gather strength and fine
ness from hisses. Applause ouy made him
retiring and patient, for he sat little value on
it. Yet even Edmund Kean knew no more
than he did how to take advantage of the
mood which applause in an audience accom
panied. There was a fashion of his, long to
be remembered, of taking up an audience
In the enthusiasm of its applausa,
and by adding something to Ids preceding
expression compel it to indorse a prin
ciple which it would not have in
dorsed in soberer moments. Yet his
influence was always calm. He was not a
man who would wish-to excite enthusiasm.
Nor did he always undertake to convince
men by logical expositions. He told radical,
intellectual.thruths in a grave, elegant, and
exquisitely keen way. He never stormed —
never expostulated. He appealed to the jus
tice that resides in men's intelligence. He
was called a demagogue, but he was called
suce only by men whom his chaste and
severe intellectuality could not reach. Never
did he appeal to prejudice. Once when he
was criticising the supreme court under Chief
Justice Chase there was an outburst of
hisses. He simply replied: "Go and ex
amine 'em then"—and caused. There was
nothing witty in the repartee, but the calm
positiveness of the man cause the audience
to be puzzled for a moment in trying to "ex
amine 'em," and it burst into cheers.
•5fc To most young students who believed that
oartory was impassionate and loudely grand
Mr. Phillips was disappointing. To be sure,
they could usually appreciate the mild and
careless sarcasm, but they thought it only
heralded the coming storm. But when he
sat down at the end of an hour and a half
they thought he had spoken only five min
utes. He left his suggestions with the audi
ence and "set itthinking." John Bright, in
the hight of his fame, said that Wendell
Phillips was "the most powerful orator who
speaks the English language." "Wended
Phillips," said a western colonel, who
had never heard him," is a—an uproar
ious devil." "No, replied a south
ern statesman, "he is an infernal machine
set to music." For style of language he
studied in the suggestive school of modern
Boston. Somehow he [>nd Emerson and
Hawthorne were always interchanging figures
of speech. "The bright consummate flower"
is in Phillips' book, in one of Emerson's and
in one of Hawthorne's. In a way Phillips
patronized the style of rhetoric which is now
adays in the pages of Bagehot and Arnold
and Morley, sharpening the turgid style of
the English reviews. He never left any
dark corners for hanging cobwebs on. He
studied Bacon's essays and De Toqueville's
democracy and whatever, from the pens of
new writers gave fresh views on government
and social life. He was a reader also of
Charles Reade, because Reade was always
freshening things. He was not slow to ap
propriate any suggeston that came to him
from other sources. Whatever pierced into
his intellect he gave out again, as good as he
got it, in a style terse and suggestive, leaving
much to the reader, inspiring an idea of jus
tice rather than presenting an argument. He
very much resembled Frederick William
Robertson, of Brighton. Their studies were
alike. Robertson had the same love for
books of biography, and, strangely enough,
was devoted to theories for training animals.
So, too, like Phillips, he studied chemistry as
other men read novels —for pleasure.
To be Paid.
New Yoke, Feb. 11.—Receiver Green, of
the North River Construction company,
stated to-day, that the chancellor of New Jer
sey had authorized him to pay the men for
merly in the employ of that company, and
the payments will begin to-morrow.
Sold to Another Company.
Quebec, Feb. 11.—The North American
Rubber works has received orders from the
directors at Montreal to close the business in
Quebec the first of May, and transfer the
same to the Canadian Rubber company, of
Montreal.
The Voting Strength.
Scraxtox, Pa., Feb. 11.—An attempt has
been made to inflate the registry lists of the
next election with dead and departed voters
to the number of 700.
Ice Races.
Poughkeepsie, N. Y., Feb. 11.—In the
second ice yacht race for Dr. Barron's cup
l Jack Frost won the cun for the second time.
OFFICIAL.
Proceeds of tteJM of Pnblicforte j
Regular Meeting.
St. Paul, January 28, 1884.
Board met at 2 p. m.
Present—Messrs. Barrett, Hoyt, Koch,
Peters and Mr. President.
Absent—Mr. Terry.
Minutes of the 21st, 24th and 25th insts.
read and approved.
T. Bingham presented a written protest
against the assessment of his property for the
sewer on Walnut street. Considered and
placed on file.
A communication was received from Wm.
R. Marshall, Vice President of the Minnesota
& Northwestern Railroad company, request
ing the Board to designate that portion of
the Sixth ward levee to be used as the right
of way of said railroad company, in accord
ance with requirements of ordinance No.
364. Referred to the City Attorney for re
port as to the authority of the Board in this
matter.
A communication was received from A. R.
Capehart, protesting against the paving of
Fifth street. Considered and placed on
file.
Albert Armstrong and a large number of
property owners appeared before the Board
with a written protest against the proposed
paving of Fifth street west of St. Peter street,
and after hearing all persons present inter
ested in said matter, said protest was placed
on file.
At this stage of the proc-fcdings of the
Board Mr. Koch was excused irom further at
tendance at this meeting.
Patrick Doherty made an application for li
cense to tap and connect with city sewers
for the year 1884, which was granted and
bond approved.
In the matter of the application of Kenny
& Hudner for license to tap and connect
with city sewers for the year 1884 the same
was granted and bond approved.
In the matter of the application of Henry
Bonn for plumber's license, it was ordered
that the same be granted when the proper
bond has been furnished.
O. C. Pasel and other property owners on
Fifth street, between Maple and Maria aven
ues presented a written release for all claims
for damages arising from the grading of said
streets between said points.
Complaint having been made that the con
tractor for the sewer on Jeilerson avenue is
not carrying on the work so as to insure the
completion of said sewer within the specified
time, the engineer was instructed to notify
said contractor to increase his force at once,
otherwise the contract will be taken away
from him and the work completed by the
city.
The Engineer having reported that the
frontage of lots 1 and 2, block 2. Neurer's
addition is 45.4 feet on Como avenue. It
was ordered that no abatement be made in
the assessment against said property, for the
planting and protection of shade and orna
mental treos on both sides of Como avenue.
The Engineer having submited report as
to the location of the sidewalk in front of lot
0, block 177, Robertson's addition to West
St. Paul, it was ordered that no abatement
be made in the assessment against said prop
erty for the construction of said walk. Yeas,
5; nays, 1, (Mr. Peters.)
The Engineer having reported in the
matter of the petition of F. W. II.
Gelderman asking the allowance of the
amount charged against him for engineering
and inspection on his final estimate for
grading Ellen street, it was ordered that the
same be returned to the Council endorsing
the report of the Engineer.
The Engineer having reported in the mat
ter of the petition of Mrs. Delia Rogers for
a reconsideration of the assessment against
lot 3, block 4, Patterson's addition to
St. Paul, for sewer on St. Paul and Somerset
streets, it was ordered that said petition be
returned to the Council, with the report that
the Board cannot recommend any abatement
of said assessment.
The Engineer having reported in the mat
ter of the petition of John D. Moran, asking
the allowance of the $27.00 charged against
him for inspection on his final estimate for
grading Beech street, it was ordered that
said petition be returned to the Council, en
dorsing the report of the Engineer.
The Engineer having reported that the
drainage for the Ryan hotel can be accom
plished by way of Sixth aud Wakouta streets
into the Fourth street sewer at less cost than
either the Robert or Jackson street system,
but that the adoption of this plan will require
a modification of the existing contract on
Sixth street, it was ordered that said report,
together with the one in the matter of recon
struction of the Robert and Sixth streets
sewers, be referred to the City Attorney and
Engineer.
The Engineer having submitted plan and
. estimate of cost in the matter of the order of
Council to Board for formal report on the
construction of slope walls on Rice street,
from Bianca street to the northerly city lim
its to support street, the same was laid over
to February 4th, 1884.
The Engineer having submitted plan of
land to be taken, the following report was
ordered sent to the Council, to wit:
To the Common Council of the City of St.
Paul:
The Board of Public Works have had un
der consideration the resolution or order of
the Common Council, approved October 4,
18S3, relative to the opening of an alley
through block 53, Rice ife Irvine's addition to
St. Paul, from Third street to Chestnut street,
and having investigated the proposed im
provement, respectfully report that said im
provement is necessary and proper, thirty
feet wide, that the estimated expense thereof
is $8,500; that real estate to be assessed
therefor can be found benefited to the extent
of the damages, costs and expenses neces
sory to be incurred thereby, that said im
provement is not asked for by
a petition of a majority of
the owners of property to be assessed there
for, but we herewith send a plan or profile of
of said improvement, and an order.for your
adoption, if you desire us to make the im
provement. Yeas, 4; nays, 0.
In the matter of the order of Council to
Board for formal report on grading Fifth
street, the following report was ordered sent
to the Council, to-wit:
To the Common Council of the City of St.
Paul:
The Board of Public Works have had un
der consideration the resolution or order of
the Common Council approved December 23,
1883, relative to the grading Fifth street,
from Maria avonue to Maple avenue, and
having investigated the proposed improve
ment, respectfully report that said improve
ment is necessary and droper, that the es
timated expense thereof is $4,700, one-half
of which need not be paid into the City
Treasury before the contract is let; that real
estate to be assessed therefor can be found
benefited to the extent of the costs and ex
penses necessary to be incurred thereby,
that said improvement is not asked for by a
petition of a majority of the owners of prop
erty to be assessed therefor, but wc herewith
send a plan or profile of said improvement,
and an order for your adoption, if you desire
us to make the improvement. Yeas, 4,
nays 0.
In the matter of the order of Council to
Board for formal report on paving Fifth
street, from St. Peter street to Broadway—
which was laid over to this day—it was or
dered that the same be referred to the Engin
eer for plan and estimate of cost.
The Clerk was directed to give the first
assessment notice for the construction, re
laying and repairing of sidewalks under con
tract of Peter Bcrkey, (Estimate No. 9), for
the term beginning April 1, 1883, and end
ing November 1, 1883.
In the matter of the order of Council to
Board for formal report on grading Dakota
avenue to a partial grade 66 feet wide from
the end of the Wabashaw street bridge to
Goffe street, and Goffe street full grade,
from Dakota avenue to Dearborn street,
which was laid over to this day, it was or
dered that .the same be laid over until Feb
ruary 4th, 1884.
In the matter of modified plans and speci
fications for the grading of Fillmore avenue,
(formerly McCarthy street), to a partial grade
and full width, from State street to the pro
posed levee, it was ordered that the same be
laid over to February 4th, 1884.
In the matter of the order of Council to
Board for formal report on grading Aurora
avenue, from Rice street to Western avenue,
it was ordered that the same be laid over to
await the decision of the court in regard to
the matter of appeal of Mr. Murphy vs. The
City.
In the matter of the or
der of Council to Board for
formal report on opening and extending
Waverly street through block 5, Bass' outlots
between Westminster street aud Lafayette
avanue. il was ordered that th& game be ra-
I ferred to the Engineer to consult owner as to
land to be taken.
Pursuant to due notice and the adjourn
ments thereunder the matter of making and
completing the assessment for grading Rice
street from Bianca street north "to north line
of city, on the property on the line of said
Rice street, between College avenne and the
north line of the city came up, and after hear
ing all persons present interested, the same
was adjourned until Feb. 4, 1S84, at 3
p. m. Yeas 3; nays 1 (Mr. Barrett).
Pursuant to due notice and the adjourn
ments thereunder the matter of making and
completing the assessment for the opening
and extension of Mississippi street, from
Minnehaha street to Acker street, came up,
and the same was upon motion adjourned
until Feb. 4, 1SS4, at 2 p. m.
Pursuant to due notice the matter of mak
ing and completing the assessment for the
construction of a sewer on Walnut street,
from a point forty-three feet north of north
line of Oak street to Pleasant avenue
came up, and after hearing all persons pres
ent interested the same was duly completed
and the Clerk was directed to give the con
firmation notice.
Pursuant to due notice the matter of mak
ing and completing the assessment for the
construction of a sewer on Douglas street,
from Ramsey street to Seventh street, came
up, and the same was duly completed, and
the Clerk was directed to give the confirma
tion notice.
Pursuant to due notice the matter of the
confirmation of the re-assessment for paving
Wabashaw street from Third street to College
avenue, came up, and the same was duly
confirmed.
The following estimates and bills were ex
amined and allowed, to wit:
Estimate No. 11, and final, Phalen Creek
culvert, Michael O'Brien contractor, amount
due, $5,092.57.
Bill of D. L. Curtice, of $17.50, map of
St. Paul mounted, for use in the office of
Board of Public Works, January 24, 1884.
Bill of C. D. Hopkins of $4.00, cleaning
office of Board of Public Works, January 28,
1884.
Adjourned.
John Farkixgtox,-President.
R. L. Gohmak, Clerk Board of Public Works-
Special Meeting.
St. Paul, February 1, 1884.
Board met at 9 a. m., pursuant to call.
Present—Messrs. Koch, Peters, Terry and
Mr. President.
Absent—Messrs. Barrett and Hoyt.
The following pay rolls were examined and
allowed, to-wit:
Pay roll of Engineer department, 25 em
ployes for month of January, 1S84, $1,715.27.
Payroll of office of Board of Public Works,
3 employes for month of January, 1834,
$200.
Pay roll of men cleaning and repairing
streets, 21 employes for month of January,
1884, $586.91.
Pay roll of men cleaning and repairing
sewers. 8 employes for month of Jauuarv,
1884, $328.92.
Pay roll of Inspectors, 6 employes for
month of January, 18S4, $414.
Adjourned.
Jonx Fakkixgton, President.
R. L. Gousian, Clerk of Board of Public
Works.
Goldsmith's London Chambers.
[London Times.]
The benchers of the Middle temple are
about to rebuild the chambers known as Gar
den court, and yesterday the sale of the ma
terials of the old building took place, prepar
atory to their demolition in order to clear the
site for the intended new structures. The
buildings, which will now in a few days be
swept away, are associated with many inter
esting historical memories, not the least of
which is that it was in chambers in Garden
court that Goldsmith wrote, "The Traveler,"
being, it is stated, the first work to which he
put his name. It is recorded that in 1763,
eight years after Garden court, was built,
Goldsmith removed from Wine Office court,
Fleet street, and took a humble set of rooms
in the attic floor of the then library staircase
in Garden court, sharing them with the but
ler of the society, and it was
here that he completed "The
Traveler," which was first published
in December, 1764. Some time afterward
Goldsmith took a better set of chambers on
the floor below, where he composed several
of his poems, in addition to which it is said
that he resumed practice as a physician, go
ing about in a scarlet cloak and with the
cane which, with his desk and chair, is pre
served in the Forster collection. He con
tinued to reside in Garden court until 1768,
when he purchased chambers in Brick court
out of the profits derived from his first play,
"The Good-Natured Man," and here he re
sided until his death on the 4th of April,
1774. Itjis a note-worthy concidence that
both blocks of chambers in which Goldsmith
resided during the last eleven years of his
life should be disappearing almost at the
same moment. The rebuilding of one side of
Brick court has just been completed, and the
reconstruction of Garden court is immedi
ately about to follow. Their dilapidated ap
pearance shows that the benchers have exer
cised a wise discretion in resolving upon
their demolition. For some time past they
have been shored up by huge balks of tim
ber. .
PERSONAL CHIT-CHAT.
Lucius H. Murch of Belfast, Maine, passes
as the most patient man next to Job.
Three times a day for twenty-five years has
Mr. Murch recorded in his diaries the state
of the weather.
Mrs. Louisa H. Albert of Cedar Rapids,
Iowa, has entered into partnership with her
husband in the practice of law. The sign
reads: "Albert & Albert. Attorneys at
Law."
Miss Martha Jellison, who died recently
in Ellsworth, Me., aged 93 years, had taught
school in that city for sixty years.
Colonel, David H. Strother, "Porte Cray
on," is coming home from the City of M exi
co in the spring.
The widow of General Custer is spending
the winter in Detroit, the guest of her late
husband's sister, Mrs. Calhoun.
The last story attributed to Tom Ochiltree
is one which makes him the prospective son
in-law of Bonanza Mackay.
John Boyle O'Reilly has the manuscript
of Wendell Phillips's famous address on O'-
Connell, the only effort of the kind the dis
tinguished orator wrote out in full.
Col. A. W. Sheldon, who died in Chicago
a few days ago, received five wounds during
the war, one of which finally caused his
death. He was sent to Arizona last April as
judge of the territorial courts.
Mr. Henry Bergh, whose sympathies are
touched when a man hits a reluctant mule
with a black-snake whip, is the gentleman
who is urging the bill in the New YorkwVs
sembly providing for the public whipping of
men who abuse their wives.
Prince Napoleon Victor, son of Prince Na
poleon, will shortly visit the Empress Eugen
ie, who is now in England, the guest of
Princess Beatrice. Early in the summer he
will make an extended tour in the United
States.
John M. Forbes, who owns the large is
land of Naushon, near Nantucket, takes his
friends deer-hunting when he wants to
amuse them. It is not considered dear
hunting, as none of his friends have been
able to kill one of the animals yet.
Mr. Cable, the lecturer, who has been
quite ill at the house of "Mark Twain," in
Hartford, is improving. A telegram from
Mr. Clemens says tlrei Mr. Cable has about
discarded medicines and is now taking food.
He expects to be on his feet sosn.
The Washington Gazette says: "Col.
Thomas Worthington, an officer who was dis
abled in the late war after much distinguish
ed service, is an inmate of Providence Hos
pital, very ill, with slight chance of restora
tion to health. Col. Worthington has suffer
ed greatly in reputation and money through
the malign Sherman influence that has thus
far prevented him from receiving justice
from the government in both instances, the
latter being a just claim that should have
been long ago settled."
"Mi" is Chinese for "American." As
"spelling reformers" the Chinese are away
ahead of this country. None of our spelling
reformers, who spell facts "fax," would
think of spelling America with only two lct
teii.-^-Norrij:f .«.vii Herald.
CITY NOTICE.
—————
Notice for Judgment.
Ottick or th* City The.vsibek, I
St. Pacl, Minn., Feb. 11, 1884. j
I will make application to the District Court in
and for the county of Ramsey and state of Min
nesota, at the special term held Saturday, March
1, 1884, at the Court House, in St. Paul, Minne
sota, for judgment against the several lots and
real estate embraced in a warrant in my hands
for the collection of unpaid assessments, with in
terest and costs thereon for the hereinafter
named special assessments.
All in the City of St. Panl, Connty of Ramsey,
and state of Minnesota, when and where all per
sons interested may attend and be heard.
The owners and description of lots and real es
tate are as follows:
Assessment for partial grading
of Pleasant Avenue, from Bam
sey Street to South City Limits.
Whitacre, Brisbine & Mnllen's Subdivision of
Lots 1 and 2, Leech's Addition 9f Out
lots.
Supposed owner and Am't of
description. Lot. Assm't
R Whitacre, (Except Pleasant ave
nne) ii 510 40
Pat Lev, (Except Pleasant avenue). 12 28 70
S D Lord, (N of Pleasant avenue)... 13 4 10
Same, (X of Pleasant avenue) 14 8 20
R Whitacre, (S of Pleasant avenue). 13 8 20
Same, (S of Pleasant avenue) 14 4 10
M L Johns, (Except Pleasant avenue)15 16 40
Same, (Except Pleasant avenue) 16 20 50
Julia New, (Except Pleasant avenue)17 M 60
Michael Morn, (N of Pleasant ave
nue) 31 1 10
Same, (S of Pleasant avenue) 31 8 20
P Doherty, (Except Pleasant avenue)27 28 70
Same, (Except Pleasant avenue)...26 8 20
Wm Markoe, (Except Pleasant ave
nue) 71 24 60
Same, (Except Pleasant avenuo) 72 16 40
Terrace Park Addition.
Supposed owner and Am't of
description. Lot. Block. Assm't.
John Wagner 2 12 $36 90
Same 3 12 49 20
Jane B Hunter 4 12 49 20
Same 5 12 49 20
Same e 12 49 20
J Monasch 8 12 49 20
Wm Carter 12 12 49 20
S A McFarland •. 14 12 49 20
Same 15 12 41 00
John W White 15 8 49 20
E O Johnstone 13 8 49 20
Same 12 8 49 20
Wai F Lindeman 9 8 49 20
L K Stone 3 3 49 20
RS Osgood 1 11 0150
Same 2 11 49 20
John Strap 3 11 49 -MJ
Thus B Marrett 7 11 49 x'O
J P Wright 9 11 49 20
Same 10 11 49 20
J E Martin 11 11 49 20
Same 12 11 41 00
Caroline Karger, ft W K of 1&2 9 65 60
J Andersou, N' 50 ft of E 4 4 9 12 30
Fred Starey, N r M of E H-. 7 9 16 40
Wm F LLideman 9 9 65 60
Wright's Aiiditlou.
Supposed owner and Am't of
description. Lot. Block. Assm't.
John Graff 1 2 $1U 40
Frank Horcys 2 2 80 60
James Boshek 3 2 28 TO
Thos J Armstrong, (E 60 ft
of) 4 3 28 70
Thos Horack, (W 20 ft of). 4 2 D: 30
Same, (E 13 ft of) 5 2 S !i0
John Graff, (except E 13 ft) 5 2 41 00
game o 2 41 oo
.*ame 7 " 45 10
8 2 49 20
: ame 9 2 49 20
-ame 10 2 49 20
:ame 11 2 49 20
.-ame 12 2 49 20
Highland Fark Addition.
Suppos ;d owner and Am't of
description. Lot. Block. Assm't.
A K Burnum, et al 1 8 $45 M
r-ame 1 7 41 00
(ame 2 7 88 BO
J-ame 3 7 32 80
Same 4 7 32 80
.-•ame 5 7 32 80
t*ame 6 7 32 80
Same 7 7 32 80
Same 8 7 32 80
Same 9 7 32 80
Same 10 7 32 80
Sume 11 7 32 80
Sume 1 1 172 -*0
Same 2 1 W0 30
Same 15 62 30
Same 3 5 3'.* b'>
Sume 4 5 32 80
Same 5 5 82 80
Same 6 5 82 80
Sume 7 5 32 80
Same 8 5 22 80
Same 9 5 32 80
Same 10 5 32 80
Same 11 5 32 80
Same 12 5 32 80
Same 13 5 32 80
Same 14 5 32 80
Sumo 15 5 32 80
Sume 16 5 49 20
Same 3 3 147 60
Same 4 3 104 00
Same 4 164 00
C. W. Grijjgs, et al. Undivided % of tho
following: Commencing on S line of SE
ii of section 2, town 28, range 23,
080 74-100 ft W of SE corner thereof;
thence W along said Sline400 ft: thence
N 1,242 hi ft; tbence E 400 ft;i thence S
1,242% ft to beginning. (Except Pleas
ant avenue) $13 53
Stinson, Brown & Ramsey's Addition.
Supposed owner and Am't of
description. Block. Assm't.
J Stinson, (N of Pleasant avenue)
E V, of 6 $32 80
Same, (S of Pleasant avenue and
except S 80 f t) E y 2 ot 6 262 40
A. V. Brown's Subdivision of West half ot Block
6, Stiiisuii, Brown & Ramsey's Addition.
Supposed owner and Am't of
discription. Lot. Assm't
Johanna Reis (except Pleasant
avenue 15 15 82 80
N M Weide (except Pleasant av
enue) 18 8 20
W F LiDdeman (north of Pleas
ant avenue) 7 S 20
N M. Weide (except Pleasant av
enue) 17 8 20
E M Fairchild(except Pleasant av
avenne) 8 12 30
E M Fairchild (except Pleasant
avenue) * 32 80
Stinson, Brown & Ramsey's Addition.
Supposed owner and Am't of
discription. Block Assm't
A Ramsey and C E Whiting (north
of Pleasant avenue and except
south 80 feet) 8 _€2 40
A Ramsey and E C Whlting(south
of Pleasant avenue, and except
south 80 feet) 7 98 40
J Stinson (north of Pleasant av
enue) e Y% of 8 213 20
Same (south of Pleasant avenue)E
Yi of 8 2120
A. V. Brown's Subdivision of West Half of Block
8, Stinson, Brown & Ramsey's Addition.
Supposed owner and Am't of
description Lot Ass'mt
J Mainzer(except Pleasant avenue)18 8 20
Stinson, Brown and Ramsey's Addition.
Supposed owner and Am't of
description. Block. Ass'mt
P P Wintermute (except 8 90 feet
and Pleasant avenue 38 102 50
Subdivision of Ayd's farm, being N 100 Acres of
H W H ol Section 11, Town 28, Range 23.
Supposed owner and Am't of
description. Lot. Ass'mt.
P J Schmidz (N of Pleasant ave
nue) 3 $203 35
Same (S of Pleasant avenue) 3 65 60
Michel & Robertson's Addition.
Supposed owner and Am't of
description. Lot. Block. Assm't.
BMichel 11 1 $32 80
Same 12 1 32 80
AlbGebele 1 2 32 80
BMichel 2 2 32 80
Same 8 2 32 80
Same 2 82 80
Same 5 2 82 80
Same 8 2 32 80
Same 7 2 32 80
Same 8 2 82 80
Same 10 8
Same » 11 8 -102 50
Same 12 8 |
Same .- 13 8 '
Same 14 8 -102 50
Same 15 3 I
B. Michel & W. R. Marshall .1 « 53 30
Same S 4 53 30
Same 3 4 53 80
Same 4 4 53 30
Same 8 4 53 30
B.Michel 1 7 53 30
Same.... 3 7 53 30.
K<u»« ~~.. 8 » .. *«. 80
Same 4 7 83 9
Same 8 7 53 9
Same 15 13 »
Same 16 13 f w *
John Bargmacn 17 13 ( -^
Same 18 18 j ■ *
Michael £der(ex.Pleasn't av) 1 14 [
Same 2 14 j •* *
F. Michel (ex. Pleasant av.)24 14 I
Same 23 14 f '3 •
H. M. Rice, E 8 rods of W 32 rods of N" 32
rods of NWJi ofSWJi of sec 11, town
28, range 23, (except Pleasant avenue
and Randolph street) $408 8
H M Rice, S 68 rods of H 100 rods of W
32 rods of W H of section 11, town 28,
range 23, (Except Pleasant avenuo).. .$328 01
B McGehn, et al.. Part E'ly of Pleasant
avenue, of 3 4, of N H of SW 54 of SW
?4 of section 11, town 23, range 23 300 O
Same, Part W'ly of Pleasant avenue, of
SW V t of N % of SW 54 of SW •*•* of
section 11, town 28, range 23 300 0
R B Rankins, et al.. Part E'ly of Pleasant
avenue, of N H of S Vi of SW >4 of SW
J4 of section 11, town 23, range 23 »200 0
Same, Part W'ly of Pleasant avenue of X
ft of S !i of SW !4 of SW 34 of section
11, town 23, range 23 300 0
All in the city of St. Paul, connty of Ramsey
state of Minnesota, GEO. W. REIS,
43-46 City Treasure!
CITY NOTICE,
Notice for Judgment
Office op the Citt TREAsrani, »
St. Paul, Minn., Feb. 11, 1834. j
I will make application to the District Court L
and for the county of Bamsey and state of Mia
nesota, at a special term held Saturday, March 1
1884, at the Court House in St. Paul, Minnesota
for judgments against the several lots ant
real estate embraced in a warrant In my handl
for the collection of unpaid assessments, witi
interest and costs thercou for the huruinatte
named special assessments.
AH in the City of St. Paul, county of Ramse;
and State of Minnesota, when and whore all per
sons interested may attend and be heard.
The owners and description of real estate ur
as follows:
Assessment for grading alley n
block 30, Bice & Irvine's Addi.
tion, between Elm and Sher
man streets.
Bice & Irvine's Addition.
Supposed owner aud Ain't, a
description. Lot. Block. Aiim't
M .1 Uogcrs.'exccpt SE 8 ft)
SW Vt 2 30 $15 0
Same, (except SB 8 ft) 3 30 30 0
G C Uardner, (except SB
8 ft) 4 30 30 0*
Alex Ramsey, (except SE
8 ft) 6 30 19 0
A It Wood i W U Ulenny,
(except SE 8 ft) 11 30 30 0
Same, (except SE 8 ft) 12 30 i.'0 0
All in the City ot St. Paul, county of Ramsey
State of Minnesota.
43-40. GEORGE REIS, City Treasurer.
OITY NOTICE,
NOTICE FOR JUDGMENT
Office of tue City Ttbasureb, I
St. Paul, Minn., Feb 11, 1884. j
I will make application to the District Com
in and for the county of Ramsey and State o
Minnesota, at the special term held SaturduJ
March 1, 1884, at the Court House, in St. Pau!
Minnesota, for judgments against the several lol
and real estate embraced in a warrant in my band
for the collection of unpaid assessments, with ia
terest and costs thereon for the hereinafter nuina
Bpeciul assessments.
All in the City of St. Paul, county of Ramsei
and State of Minnesota, when and where all pel
sous interested rnuy attend and be heard.
The owners and description of lots and rei
estate are as follows:
Assessment for Grading Vie?
street, from Randolph, street tt
Seventh street.
Clarke's Addition.
Supposed owner and Am't o
description. Lot. Block. Assm'o
DC Robert 40 0 1
Same 39 6 >$237 0
Same 38 tt J
EMVanDuzen 1 7 j
Same 2 7 J»$237 0
Same 3 7 )
Thomas Petera 40 7 20 0
Same 89 7 79 0
Same 38 7 79 0
J W Cllne tt 5 237 0
All in the City of St. Paul, county of Ramsej
State of Mlssesota.
43-40 CEORGE REIS, City Treasurer.
CITY NOTICE
Notice for Judgment
_
Office op tiil City Tkkasubcr, \
ST. Paul, Minn., Feb. 11, 1884. f
I will make application to tbe District Court, 1
and for the county of Itumscy aud State o
Minnesota, at tbe Bpeciul term held Suturday
March 1, 1884, at tbe Court House, in St. Paul
Minnesota, for judgments against tbe several lot
and real estate embraced in a warrant in my band
for tbe collection of unpaid assessments, w id
interest and costs thereon for tbo hereinafte
special assessments.
All in the City of St. Paul, county of Ramsey
and State of Minnesota, when and where all pel
sons interested may attend and be heard.
Tbe owners and description of real estate ar
as follows:
Asiessment for Grading Cedai
street from Twelfth street U
Bluff street.
Baziile's Addition.
Supposed owner and Am't o
description. Lot. Block. Agtm't
John Wagner 1 2 $180 (J
S R DeGraw, S '/, uf 2 2 90 U
Mary F DeGraw, N K of... 2 2 90 U
Colored Baptist Church.... 3 2 baj 119 U
S R Simonton, (S of Thir
teenth street) "B" 80 0i
Same, (N of Thirteenth
street) *-B" 80 0
£ M Van Duzzee, S 50 ft of
N935-6ftof "D" 151 5t
Litchfield's Subdivision of block 1, Medlll'a Ad
dittos.
Supposed owner and Am't a
description. Lot. Assm't
Samuel Wisnom 20 $120 9
U L Lamprey. That piece of land bound
ed N'ly by Blulf street, E'ly by a line
drawn at right angles with Bluff street
S'ly from tbe point where a line 10 ft
W'ly of and parallel with tbe £ line of
lot 9, block 3, Lambert & Co's addition
to St. Paul, if produced S'ly wonld in
tersect said Bluff street, S'ly by a line
150 ft N'ly of and parallel with Four
teenth street in Medlll's addition to St.
Paul, W'ly by Cedar street $490 0|
All in the City of St. Paul, County ot Rams***
State of Minnesota.
4340 GEORGE REIS, City Treasurer.
STATE OF MINNESOTA, COUNTY OF BAMSEZ
In District Court, Second District.
In tbe matter of tbe Assignment of 9. C. Slmonai
to Edward H. Habl«horst:
And now upon reading and filing tbe petition ol
Edward H. Hablgborst, the assignee of J. C. Slmo
net, to Beta time and place to bear the appllcatlol
(or the settlemtnt ef this assignment and for hli
final discharge herein as socb assignee. It is orderes .
that said application for settlement of his acooom
for his final discbarge from all liability and respon
sibllity as sach assignee of said J. O. blmonet bo
heard before this court at a special term thereof U
be held at the court house, In the city of St. Paul
In said eounty, on Saturday, the 23d day of Febru*
ry, A. L>. 1884, at ten o'clock in the forenoon ol
said day, or aa soon thereafter as counsel can b*
heard, and that notice of said application be served
on all the creditors of the said J. C. Slinonet, wb«
have proved their claims herein, and on the «aW
J. C. Simonet, by depositing in the postofflc* at St
Paul, in said county, at least twenty daye Defer*
the return day of thia order, a copy of this ordei
duly enveloped and fully postpaid and duly en
dorsed and directed to said J. O. Simonet, and U
eaoh of the creditors of the said J. C. Simonet
who have proved their claims as aforesaid at theii
respective places of residence.
And that notice be also given herein by publish
ing this order in the St. Paul Daily Qlobi, foi
three consecutive weeks, at least once a week b»
fore the return day of this order, the last publica
tion thereof to be at least three days before the re
turn day thereof.
January 23d, 1S84.
OBLANDO SIMOND3,
District Jotjf*
£. B, BotCOJOK, Attorney for Assignee,
*** <4B')Ullll'U*>
8

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